#2
this is why it doesn't sound how you want it to:

- You're still a beginner

- You're using what looks to be a cheap Squier

- You're likely running through a low end amp

- You're likely using a camera mic which has very shitty audio quality.

- Your guitar is out of tune

- You're not Smashing Pumpkins

- You're still a beginner

Hard life being a guitar player. Welcome to the lifelong journey of tone chasing however. It's a daunting and expensive journey, but we all do it unfortunately.


TLDR: You can't make yourself sound better in front of your friends.
Last edited by vayne92 at Mar 18, 2014,
#3
You have two different problems here, one is tone and one is actual playing. Don't worry about your tone so much, it will improve with your playing and with your gear, so ill talk about it, but please feel free to disregard everything I say and focus on the second part.

As far as tone goes, you don't have enough saturation, the recording isnt exactly hd, but it seems like you would be well served by picking up a new tube amp and a guitar with humbuckers. Turning down your tone knob and checking your eq would definitely help as well.

You seemed really tense when the solo started and just very uncomfortable and awkward. Stop trying to throw the guitar around and focus entirely on playing. The stagecraft will work alot better when you have the song down perfectly. Parts also seemed out of tune, though that could be either A. You're pressing too hard and goingn sharp, B. Your guitar is out of tune slightly (most likely) or C. your tensing up and bending unintentionally. The actual bends were better, but still a bit off.


Honestly, just focus on relaxing as much as possible, get really really comfortable playing rythm, then move to lead. Find someone better to jam with, online or in person. Once you're comfortable playing with someone else, you'll be alot more comfortable playing by yourself and in front of friends. Please dont take my words too harshly, I know I tend to come off as overly critical, as a beginner just focus on having fun and learning, dont get obsessed with tone, gear and all the crap that comes with it.
2013 Ibanez Jem 7vwh
Lakewood Sungha Jung Signature
Fender Custom Shop Stratocaster
LTD Deluxe MH-1000NT
MIA Fender Strat VG + MiJ Mustang
Martin D1 +Tayor 210e
Kremona Rondo TL Classical
Gretsch G5120
Last edited by battlespud at Mar 18, 2014,
#4
Thanks battlespud. I plan on getting humbuckers but the tube amp of mine is actually new, I just need to get a new speaker and I'm not running using a cheap squire vayne. It's not the most expensive guitar in the world but its a 96 mexi strat. Amp is peavey vk-112
Last edited by 457undead at Mar 18, 2014,
#6
Your guitar isn't tuned very well by the sounds of it. Also your bends aren't quite hitting their mark. It's just a little bit sloppy in general. Try playing along to the solo with the song slowed down a fair amount. Make sure you get it as close as you can.

Just give it time. More practice. Learn more song and stuff. It'll sound better over time
#7
Quote by Vanhalaf
It's your playing.


This.
Like others have said, I think you should work with the track: play together with the original solo slowed down until you hear bends,intonation and rhythm correct (you tend to cut off phrases and not hold the notes for their entirety). Then, when you get it down work with the backing track: record yourself again and see if it needs more work. With some work, you'll get it
#8
In addition to learning songs you like, remember to practice all the techniques that you need. From the video one can tell that your timing is a bit off, you don't use vibrato, and your string bending technique is lacking. Also in general your fretting hand seems a bit tensed out.

Being tense is normal for someone starting out. The key is to acknowledge this and always practice as tension free as possible. Practice slowly at first, with a metronome. When you get this down smoothly and without tension, speed up. Practicing like this will also improve your timing.

Look up lessons/articles on bending and vibrato, then practice those separately 5-10 min every day, and you'll be seeing improvement in no time. I don't feel like going into depth here because there's so much info on the web, but here's the basics on bending: Especially at first, don't use only your index finger to bend. It sounds bad, feels bad and it's really inefficient. It feels like lifting grocery bags with your pinky. Use multiple fingers, and get the strength from your wrist, not your fingers.

Regarding vibrato: If you look at any seasoned guitar player you will notice that whenever he/she plays a slightly longer note, there's vibrato. Lingering notes without vibrato sound awkward.

Hope that helps!
Last edited by AmIEvil? at Mar 18, 2014,
#10
I've personally never used slow-down software (definitely an option), but what I recommend is getting Guitar Pro 6 (if you don't have it yet). There's millions of downloadable tabs (ex. on this site) and 90% of them have drum/bass tracks. And you can slow it down as you like. Also really good for learning notation, rhythm and for composing.
#11
1) your guitar is out of tune in the higher register.

2) You need to practice bending to pitch. A great way of doing this is to fret the note you want to bend to ( such as fret 12 ) and then do the full step bend on 10th fret so that you can clearly hear if you hit the target note. Eventually it will be instinctive. The same works for half step bends. If you bend a note off pitch it kills the entire vibe of a whole solo and makes you automatically appear like an amateur - so practice that.

3) vibrato - this takes practice and it will take years before you get a vibrato that sounds natural. However, you need to practice this technique which each finger. Really concentrate on the articulation of each note - listen to the record and try to imitate it.
#12
save being "into it" for when you've got all the parts down. It appears you're letting your excitement get the best of you, and it interferes with your playing.

Take it one little piece at a time. It's a really short solo, you could focus on each individual note if you want to, and you'd probably benefit a great deal from doing so.
#13
Idk about vibrato, whenever I try to the high strings are to stiff to move like that
#14
What gauge strings are you using?
2013 Ibanez Jem 7vwh
Lakewood Sungha Jung Signature
Fender Custom Shop Stratocaster
LTD Deluxe MH-1000NT
MIA Fender Strat VG + MiJ Mustang
Martin D1 +Tayor 210e
Kremona Rondo TL Classical
Gretsch G5120
#15
I'm using the regular slinky 10 gauge strings, when I brake those I'm going to put hybrid slinkys on
#16
10's are a great gauge, I wouldn't recommend changing them. You just need to build up your vibrato and string bending practice.
#17
If you're struggling bending I'd change them. i've been playing for years and it's only recently that I don't find 10s difficult to bend. And even still, given the free choice, I prefer 9s. There's no advantage to making it hard on yourself, really, as long as light gauge strings are readily available. Plenty of pro players use light strings.

Aside from that, I agree with what everyone else is saying. I didn't think that was a bad attempt for a beginner, fwiw.

I think billy corgan uses a big muff? it's very saturated and sustaining, and might help (in addition to practising more). Or an OD pedal is a handy way to get more saturation too which might be more useful for more general playing.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
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#18
Id also recommend switching to 9s for now. I found them a lot easier while learning and honestly prefer them on strats in general.
2013 Ibanez Jem 7vwh
Lakewood Sungha Jung Signature
Fender Custom Shop Stratocaster
LTD Deluxe MH-1000NT
MIA Fender Strat VG + MiJ Mustang
Martin D1 +Tayor 210e
Kremona Rondo TL Classical
Gretsch G5120
#19
One thing that is not touched on here is 2 things:

1: always practise to a metronome slow to the desired speed.
2: Your lefthand needs to be able to the legato work in order to synch in with your right hand.

Make it a habit until it feels natural to you playing it.

That goes for every guitar bit you could ever think of. It is nothing but habits that you need to get down. Make sure they are great.
#20
I don't think i need to use my metronome, I can keep time perfectly fine without one.
#21
Quote by 457undead
I don't think i need to use my metronome, I can keep time perfectly fine without one.


This is one of the most suicidal things a guitar player can say and tbh ive said it alot so i know how detrimental ignoring a metronome is.

Practice slowly, remember even the most advanced players have their moments and say "i suck at this shit". Theres nothing to be embarrased about if your playing is weak, whats embarrassing is if you give up and dont practice.

No matter how much advice fellow users give you, no one knows your faults better than you. So focus on the video and try to point out your faults yourself because only then you will improve.
#22
Quote by 457undead
Thanks for the responses again, do you know of any good slow down mp3 programs?



I like avs audio editor trail version or if you have the track on your phone you can get asc on Android.
"Could everyone please stop sounding like everyone else that's trying to sound like meshuggah?"

-Emil Werstler

Quote by damian_91
Kurt Cobain, the best guitarist to ever live.

#23
Quote by 457undead
I don't think i need to use my metronome, I can keep time perfectly fine without one.


No. No you can't.

Frankly I don't care if you've been playing 50 years and practiced every day for 8 hours during that time; you cannot keep time perfectly fine.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#24
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
No. No you can't.

Frankly I don't care if you've been playing 50 years and practiced every day for 8 hours during that time; you cannot keep time perfectly fine.


+1
#25
Quote by 457undead
I don't think i need to use my metronome, I can keep time perfectly fine without one.


No, you can't. Use your damn metronome. It was good enough for Beethoven, it's good enough for you. The metronome is the steadiest possible tempo you can get.

Ask yourself why you don't want to use a metronome. Is it because it's difficult to stay in time with? because you're not sure what the rhythm is without the actual song playing?

Those are exactly the problems you use a metronome to solve.
Last edited by cdgraves at Mar 19, 2014,
#26
Quote by 457undead
I don't think i need to use my metronome, I can keep time perfectly fine without one.


So could an old drummer of mine allthough we never challenged him on that. We just got told by the audience his sense of being in time and then we the band were aware. He got asked to leave not soon after.

With a guitar you can play along without playing to a metronome but if your weakspots are not practised you will never improve right.

It takes certain skills to play leads and if you have not practised them against time you will never be in time and thereby never know where you are being able to play certain things. Some years later you will be aware of this fact.

You have to see the challenge that a timing device gives.

Playing guitar is nothing but the habits you develop and the firm habits of learning against time produces the most pleasant results you can ever get! And gets you to a higher level of playing faster.

For myself on a personal level I know my weakspots and I got 2 decades of playing on a serious level. I was never one to practise Speed Mechanics by Troy Stetina back then when I was 20 and I could play great sounding leads to the music I was playing anyway but the feeling of progress is not really there unless I challenge myself to do things I have never done before.

Therefore I am currently going through Far beyond the sun by Yngwie J Malmsteen which takes highly developed skills as accurate and in time it can get. As for my progress it is coming along pretty well and yes the benefits of the metronome does come into habits the more I use it. With SM and the Yngwie book my skills develop rather good at the moment.

It depends on your guitar goals of course as you can take it to any level you want. Being in time and in tune is always crucial not just fellow musicians but also for the audience.

Borrow a metronome if you havent got one and try your solo here for a week or two to see what the difference would be. The benefit is you will feel different about it.
Last edited by anders.jorgense at Mar 19, 2014,
#27
To the TS - you've received some super valuable info from the folks above. If you take this to heart at this early stage, it is going to pay huge dividends over the years as you progress.
My 0.02:
1) If you had to pick a tiny handful of universal skills that really define if you are a good musician or just run of the mill, solid timing would be on it. It's that important.
2) There's keeping time, and there's REALLY keeping time. For example, try these two challenges:
a) Set your metronome to 40 bpm and play a simple 16th notes lick. Try to get the notes on the beat to land right on the beat, and the notes in between perfectly evenly spaced.
b) Record yourself playing a rhythm with a 16th note base line. Play back and double yourself. Do your 16th notes still sound tight or do they get mushy?

Basically, both of these supposedly simple things can give some quite experienced guitarists a rude awakening! In other words, it's not just keeping time, but keeping time with a really high level of precision.

There is another thing that you will hit more and more as you progress - more challenging subdivisions of the beat or more rapid changes between them. Being able to handle these without getting thrown off depends in a large part on how solid your foundation is - how much you've drilled it with simpler stuff to the metronome.

In other words, practice with the metronome as often as possible. There are some scenarios where it's ok not to - for example, when you are just first getting a new lick under your fingers, but once you have it, it's really going to benefit you to have the metronome on at all times.
#28
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
No. No you can't.

Frankly I don't care if you've been playing 50 years and practiced every day for 8 hours during that time; you cannot keep time perfectly fine.

While I understand the idea you're going for (and I frequently practice to a metronome), I feel you're exaggerating a little bit?
Like, most any experienced drummer can keep more or less a metronomic pulse going at least for the duration of an average song, right?
Last edited by Tommat at Mar 19, 2014,
#29
Quote by Tommat
While I understand the idea you're going for (and I frequently practice to a metronome), I feel you're exaggerating a little bit?
Like, most any experienced drummer can keep more or less a metronomic pulse going at least for the duration of an average song, right?


Experienced drummers. Who spend all their time working exclusively with rhythm and have been playing for many years.

TS is clearly none of those things, quite aside from which even the most experienced and capable drummers use metronomes in the studio.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#30
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Experienced drummers. Who spend all their time working exclusively with rhythm and have been playing for many years.

TS is clearly none of those things, quite aside from which even the most experienced and capable drummers use metronomes in the studio.


Any drummer worth hiring can play to a click. I play with a guy who plays exclusively to a click with in-ear monitors (it's a cover band, accurate tempo matters a little).
#31
^
Oh yeah, I know all that is true. I wasn't referring specifically to OP, I just feel like such an overstatement can be discouraging to a less experienced musician. They may think, well, if it's such a gigantic undertaking to get solid rhythm, why bother?

I mean, even I, who practices solely rhythm for half an hour a day (though rhythm is a part of all my other playing aswell, obviously), feel like my rhythm is pretty solid. Far from perfect, but not terrible.
#32
Quote by battlespud
Once you're comfortable playing with someone else, you'll be alot more comfortable playing by yourself and in front of friends.

I lol'd
"If you're looking for me,
you better check under the sea,
because that's where you'll find me..."
#33
@OP what the actual ****? Usually the people who talk about not using metronomes have a shitty sense of timing C'mon now not to be hard on you, but the solo was pretty simple your bends were flat it sounded like your high E and B string weren't tuned, and also playing along to records doesn't mean shit most people think they're gods just because they can "mimic" their favorite guitar solos.


Funny thing is if you put on a metronome or tell them to improvise to a backing track they can't play to save their lives we call these "one trick ponies" Op I challenge you to record yourself since you have such a good sense of timing listen to the recording then post it on the forums we'll all be the judge of your perfect timing bro.


By the way playing along to records is like walking with a crutch i'm not saying it's bad, but there's a clear different between real musicians and people who mimic them.
Last edited by Black_devils at Mar 22, 2014,
#34
Well some people are way harsh here. It's like this, you probably haven't played that long and considering that do an OK job of playing this - it isn't terrible or whatever and you seem to be enjoying yourself with the instrument. Just give it time. Even though you play the solo note for note and hit most of what you need to hit doesn't mean you're playing the notes well. You don't need to show off to your friends, save that for when you know you're pretty damn good because in a few years time you'll look back at this recording and feel embarrassed

Practice, have fun and enjoy the music, don't play to impress people but play for yourself first and foremost. You're not gonna play this solo great anytime soon so chill out, play lots of other stuff and practice. You'll know exactly what you're doing "wrong" yourself when you get better.