#1
Any of you guys tried Rocksmith 2014? The friend of mine who bought a thunderverb 200 and a full stack as a starter pack for his bedroom recently grabbed a copy of RS2014 and is attempting to use it to learn guitar.

Now I personally own RS2014 myself - but I've always used it as a play-around sort of thing thing, something of the sort like guitar hero with a real guitar (cmon let's face it nothing beats having a jam where everyone shows up immediately and the drummer isn't an hour late).

Never considered it as a teaching tool for technique however. I have indeed seen the tutorial function for basic techniques such as pitch harmonics, no idea how easy they'd be to understand for someone starting from scratch though.

What are your thoughts on using Rocksmith 2014 as a 'tool' to teach guitar? Is it a mere 'toy' - or can people actually use it to learn how to play?
#2
It's a tools, not something you should base your knowledge on. It's good to have it, but the best source is the internet. There are plenty of lessons and everything about techniques and theory. A very very good software to use is guitar pro 6. It can play back tracks, slow them down, it shows you tablature and notes and you can even write stuff yourself on there.
#3
It's good for learning songs. Learning by tab is a much more tedious process than being able to slow down a song on the fly and see if you're getting the notes right, which you can do in RS.

For technique, theory, and just about everything else there are better options out there. It actually doesn't have anything on theory in the game. I do enjoy the game and it can be useful; I just wouldn't use it to teach a beginner. My main concern would be people picking up bad habits from the short videos, lack of feedback, and temptation to play pieces at full speed too quickly.
#4
they say just 'play' with it an hour a day for 60 days...well, that is sixty hours of playing/practicing/learning.

My kids take lessons - 1/2 hour a week, maybe an hour practice split over a couple more session...so to get sixty HOURS of playing/practicing/learning will take TEN MONTHS!

IMO it's not so much the tool as the TIME.
#5
iv had rocksmith and 2014, i have them both installed on my ladptop now and use it in my spare time when i get a minute, now i aint a great guitar player and if im honest using rocksmith aint helped me at all, not in a way i recognize anyways, as iv said in a post asking for help, my downfall is alternate picking and finger movement when it comes to solos, and this does nothing for technique....

the only time iv found it useful is for songs which are pretty simple like go with the flow, sugar we;re going down, give it all etc and its helped me along when iv looked at tab to get the strum pattern down, but on the flip side of that coin, rocksmith tends to give you a version of that song and mixes different parts an almost lazy version of the song and if you look at tabs they more often than not dont match up so its like hmmmm ok back to scare one...

also its pretty piss poor for technique i thought it might help with my solo-ing problem and i tried scale runner and the new streets of rage type game to see if it would help, but more often than not i find myself overwhelmed and flustered when trying to find the right fret or finger placement....

its same with the songs say mean bitch for example the strum parts im absolutely fine with, you cant really go wrong once you know power chords, same finger position moving with your lead finger 9th fret 7th freth 7th fret low E etc but when it comes to the solo its like WOAH and if your not comfortable you end up looking for the string and fret and then you have missed that note so your fighting to find the next, and that in my eyes is not a good way to learn..... at least with a tab you can go ok so thats that note then i have to go there and work out where your fingers need to be and work towards it.

same with the scale games it started on one scale and then just as i was starting to get comfortable with it it changes up and then to a different one and then another and by time you get back to the first your in the same boat and trying to learn it again.

scale runner on RS1 was a bit better but i didnt spend much time with it as you were on the same scale constantly and it just went faster and faster.

and putting all this into context iv found myself playing songs like , all the small things, go with the flow, walk, mean bitch, sugar we're going down , give it all and shying away from hangar 18 , the trooper, are you gonna go my way, basically anything thats based on single notes or solo's because as i said rhythm is so much easier and once you get comfortable with that base powerchord you cant really go wrong and theres not much to learn, but with solo's me personally i can play so much and then it just becomes overwhelming for a beginner or novice as such and theres no real way the game can stop and help you with that.
#6
I had the first Rocksmith on PS3 and I think it could be helpful. But if I remembered right, it just shows you what to do. Not why? It could help you physically play the guitar, but I think it is more of a supplement to other tools.

However, I would love it if it came to PS4 (got rid of my PS3) and I don't have a decent PC to run it solely for the Jam Session mode (or whatever it is called). Those that have it, have you messed with that?
Epi G400 '66 Reissue
w/ Airline Vintage Voiced Single Coil Pickups
#7
Quote by Killsocket
I had the first Rocksmith on PS3 and I think it could be helpful. But if I remembered right, it just shows you what to do. Not why? It could help you physically play the guitar, but I think it is more of a supplement to other tools.

However, I would love it if it came to PS4 (got rid of my PS3) and I don't have a decent PC to run it solely for the Jam Session mode (or whatever it is called). Those that have it, have you messed with that?


I've actually used session mode myself - it's great because the whole band actually shows up in an instant (cough cough compared to real life counterparts) - the only thing I find lacking is the fact that you are unable to change when the chord changes on any of the other guitars. To be honest - that was a big disappointment for me.
#8
It's good for learning (easier) songs and scales. Bad for technique (even though it explains them well) and theory is about non-existent. An average player learning songs and learning only from Rocksmith is likely to play very sloppy. It's really fun and a cool software that a guitar enthusiast should have and will enjoy - but it isn't suitable as a serious standalone learning tool.
They don't have licensed master tracks so you'll always be playing over the original track, you can't study the scores outside of play nor print them, its notation is lacking and the unique way notes are read isn't useful outside the game.
It has a lot of pros and cons and I'd definitely recommend it for casual guitarists, for someone just starting out and has never touched a guitar - probably not - but in a couple of weeks/months, sure.
#9
It'll teach you how to play the guitar but, it wont teach you how to be a musician.
Just another Sheep in the design of the Almighty Machine.


-GEAR-
Gibson 60s Les Paul Tribute (Sunburst)
1999 Ibanez RG470 (TitaniumIce-MIJ)
Jackson RR3 (Trans-Red)
Peavey 6505+
Podx3
#10
Quote by Fallenoath
It'll teach you how to play the guitar but, it wont teach you how to be a musician.


^^True that! I play it for fun and try to beat my scores for my favourite songs on it.
Schecter C-1+
PRS SE Custom 24
Ibanez RG7321 w/ Seymour Duncan Invader
EHX Metal Muff
Blackstar ID Core 20
#11
A thousand apologies for necroing this thread, but figured it'd be better than starting another one just like it. Been thinking seriously of picking this up, but also wondering if anyone has heard if a 2015 version may be coming out (perhaps for the next gen consoles?)

Primarily looking for something that will help me kick the rust off my technique and start redeveloping my muscle memory and speed again. For all intents and purposes, I'm back to square one, so hoping this will actually prove to be of some benefit.
I am a StarGeezer: some call me..."Tim."*

* - Heartfelt apologies to Monty Python for blatant plagiarism. Those responsible have been sacked.
__________

Epiphone G-400 "Goth"
Peavey Vypyr 75 Amp
#12
The main issue I've seen with Rocksmith is that, when playing Rocksmith, you play a song right when you play the right notes but when learning a guitar on your own, you play a song right when it sounds rights. You'll be able to learn to play songs with Rocksmith but you won't necessarily sound good. I think Rocksmith seems like a great idea for motivating people to play guitar, but as for actually teaching you to play guitar, I think it tends to fall short. However, if you already do know how to play guitar, then Rocksmith can be a fun little thing to have to mess around with.
#13
as a teacher I dont recommend it cause rocksmith its a game, I think its a good its entertaiment many of my students have it and I really think sometimes just give you bad technique, Rocksmith dont measure your progress as a good teacher, do it for fun
Bugera 6262
Squier Showmaster
Richman Custom
Starfire 7
Ibanez EX
Agile Interceptor 725
Behringer GX212 (now works as head)
JOYO JF 01
Kimaxe PJ Bass
#14
I have been using RS for 6 months now a lot. Maybe for than 4-5 hours a day.
I have been trying to learn guitar by myself in the past but I got frustrated and gave up.

RS helped to get my motivation back and start again. I learned more things in 6 months than in 3 years by myself.

When I decided to take proper lessons, I understand that RS is not something you can rely on as a learning tool. Very sloppy technique and bad habbits that are giving me a headache now.

However, when I got back after 2 months of lessons everything was a lot easier to play perfect.

So if you intend to use it learn some songs in a more fun way it is great but for rely on it for learning is not ok.

Right now I am getting a headache with alternate picking, bends and hand position.

Especially with bends because in order to have them recognised in the game you need to bend it a bit sharper than usual, inreality you have to train your ear from the beginning again!
#15
Quote by panosb
I have been using RS for 6 months now a lot. Maybe for than 4-5 hours a day.
I have been trying to learn guitar by myself in the past but I got frustrated and gave up.

RS helped to get my motivation back and start again. I learned more things in 6 months than in 3 years by myself.

When I decided to take proper lessons, I understand that RS is not something you can rely on as a learning tool. Very sloppy technique and bad habbits that are giving me a headache now.

However, when I got back after 2 months of lessons everything was a lot easier to play perfect.

So if you intend to use it learn some songs in a more fun way it is great but for rely on it for learning is not ok.

Right now I am getting a headache with alternate picking, bends and hand position.

Especially with bends because in order to have them recognised in the game you need to bend it a bit sharper than usual, inreality you have to train your ear from the beginning again!


Agreed here, I played the first version and learnt a couple songs that as soon as I knew I would stop playing along with the game and just play on my own to get rid of the sloppyness.

It is more fun to learn songs with the game than learning with guitar pro or tabs but you have to pay for it and it's not cheap, not to mention all the cool songs are DLC anyway. I would say this is a cool gift to get a young teen. The fun element will really get them into playing well which could benefit them a lot as they get older and want to be in bands and play music. Also great fun if you just like guitar and want to play along to some songs. However for a serious guitarist not worth it IMHO
#16
A lot of people don't know about Custom Forge - you can get thousands of songs to your Rocksmith for free. People have taken the time to transfer the tabs to actual playable (and free) DLC fsor Rocksmith. Mostly on PC, but for PS and Xbox, too.

I love it. It's much easier learning songs this way that from a dry tab printout. I would practice the songs with Rockmith and once I memorize them - plug in my amp and play them with a backing track.

But I only play for personal enjoyment. Don't know how good RS is for someone that wants to go pro. Then again, most famous guitar players never had a tutor...
Last edited by DrRus at Jun 20, 2014,
#17
Like people say it is just a game to me its a waste of money, there are better ways to learn and play guitar , now if your not that serious about learning or playing guitar then get it, RS does a good job of coving up your mistakes and making you sound good.
#18
Quote by dazzzer30
Like people say it is just a game to me its a waste of money, there are better ways to learn and play guitar , now if your not that serious about learning or playing guitar then get it, RS does a good job of coving up your mistakes and making you sound good.


I would love to hear those better ways, because the last time I checked, for the price of RS you can get about 1 hour of guitar lessons, lol.

I don't know how much you'd learn in 1 hour of tutoring, but you will learn a lot more for the measly ~$60 you'll pay to get RS2014 ...
#19
Quote by DrRus
I would love to hear those better ways, because the last time I checked, for the price of RS you can get about 1 hour of guitar lessons, lol.

I don't know how much you'd learn in 1 hour of tutoring, but you will learn a lot more for the measly ~$60 you'll pay to get RS2014 ...

Just to many negatives in RS for starters how many people like the RS tab over standard or the way the guitar sounds coming from the TV , then there's the song's- you hear the original guitar playing over you which is why you sound good when your not , It might be great for a bit of fun but best investing that money in a guitar or amp . As fair as I know There is nothing in RS you can't get for free , RS doesn't teach you how to play and you still have to teach your self with the knowledge provided from RS, I guess this is the selling point to clam it can teach you to play
#20
It's apparent that you don't own Rocksmith, so there is really nothing I can say at this point to change your mind.

Important points are:

1. The game could be played through an AVR (if on console) so you can play it through whatever speakers you wish, not the TV speakers. Same applies to the PC.

2. The game is actually a very sophisticated solid state amp itself. You can dial literally thousands of tones over any speakers, both tones of the songs or custom ones. This alone blows any practice amp out of the water. Good luck getting a decent SS amp with thousands of pre-built effects for $60.

I personally often use the "Authentic Tone" info to see what gear and settings exactly a certain song is using and if I have the pedals in question - I can match it nearly perfect on my amps (perfectly, if I have the same amp and pups). This alone to me is worth the 60 bucks - good luck finding out what are the exact settings of the pedals/amps/eq your favorite band is using for certain songs. There is so much misinformation on the net these days, it's not even worth the search. Yet, I can access this in 2 secs with RS.

3. You can pick up bad habits just as easy (or easier) through YouTube videos than through RS.

4. One learns guitar (and many other things) through practice. And RS makes practice fun. There are a hand full of basic techniques when it comes to guitar playing and you can learn them anywhere. But practicing them is where RS is very beneficial - tons of songs to practice all those techniques.

Bottom line - you can't buy a decent pedal for the cost of RS. A friend's kids are learning guitar through RS and they are doing very well indeed.

Will it teach you how to play guitar? Absolutely! Will it teach you how to be an artist? Of course not.
Last edited by DrRus at Jun 20, 2014,
#21
Quote by DrRus
It's apparent that you don't own Rocksmith, so there is really nothing I can say at this point to change your mind.

Important points are:

1. The game could be played through an AVR (if on console) so you can play it through whatever speakers you wish, not the TV speakers. Same applies to the PC.

2. The game is actually a very sophisticated solid state amp itself. You can dial literally thousands of tones over any speakers, both tones of the songs or custom ones. This alone blows any practice amp out of the water. Good luck getting a decent SS amp with thousands of pre-built effects for $60.

I personally often use the "Authentic Tone" info to see what gear and settings exactly a certain song is using and if I have the pedals in question - I can match it nearly perfect on my amps (perfectly, if I have the same amp and pups). This alone to me is worth the 60 bucks - good luck finding out what are the exact settings of the pedals/amps/eq your favorite band is using for certain songs. There is so much misinformation on the net these days, it's not even worth the search. Yet, I can access this in 2 secs with RS.

3. You can pick up bad habits just as easy (or easier) through YouTube videos than through RS.

4. One learns guitar (and many other things) through practice. And RS makes practice fun. There are a hand full of basic techniques when it comes to guitar playing and you can learn them anywhere. But practicing them is where RS is very beneficial - tons of songs to practice all those techniques.

Bottom line - you can't buy a decent pedal for the cost of RS. A friend's kids are learning guitar through RS and they are doing very well indeed.

Will it teach you how to play guitar? Absolutely! Will it teach you how to be an artist? Of course not.

I am not going to knock RS for trying and creating what is probably a good game after all, but come on - know standard notation and guitar tablature going across the screen just kills it for me , Its much easier to learning a song in standard notation and remembering it - rather than the crazy RS way that you would probably forget with out the RS screen in your face. Over all again you have the original guitar playing the same notes that you are also playing, so it covers up your bad playing to a degree and this can't be good for a beginner .

I have played RS i don't do it very much but some of the song arrangements are very good and its going to have some good points but with the frustrations that I have talk about I think limits the game to just a game.

I
#22
The ability to play custom DLC via the songs on Custom's Forge and Session Mode make it well worth the price of admission.

And the software itself may not be perfect for learning to play on its own but when combined with online tuition such as Justin Guitar for example it's a very good very low cost alternative to forking out for guitar lessons imo.

You're not going to be the next Vai or Satriani using Rocksmith by any means lol, but you.should learn enough to get by when playing with other people after as little as 6 months of regular use, whether playing covers or even simple original material.

The usefulness of Session Mode is fantastic, although it is a little rough around the edges...but then again it's the first version of it - I'm expecting more control of what your other 'band' members are playing, different time signatures and more when Rocksmith 2016 gets released.
#23
Quote by dazzzer30
...Its much easier to learning a song in standard notation...


Lol, what am I, Mozart?

Kidding aside, there is another game, Bandfuse, that uses tabs scrolling over the screen, unlike the Rocksmith colors. Needless to say, it went bankrupt I do have a copy, but I am yet to even open it. I have a ton of Custom Forge songs I am yet to even start learning.

If you find reading tabs much easier for learning songs, who am I to disagree?
#24
This is aim for motivational purposes only, if it really got you started great but do the right thing and get a teacher. and if you are really serious about guitar you need to get lessons from someone more advanced than what you are. and ROcksmith doesn't teach you about music theory that now more than ever its kinda necessary.
Bugera 6262
Squier Showmaster
Richman Custom
Starfire 7
Ibanez EX
Agile Interceptor 725
Behringer GX212 (now works as head)
JOYO JF 01
Kimaxe PJ Bass
Last edited by Tenebrion at Jun 23, 2014,
#25
Quote by Tenebrion
This is aim for motivational purposes only, if it really got you started great but do the right thing and get a teacher. and if you are really serious about guitar you need to get lessons from someone more advanced than what you are. and ROcksmith doesn't teach you about music theory that now more than ever its kinda necessary.


Theory has never been required to play the guitar. Not now, not ever.

Is it a good idea? IMO, sure, but hardly a requirement.

RS is a good tool, no more and no less.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#26
Quote by Arby911
Theory has never been required to play the guitar. Not now, not ever.

Is it a good idea? IMO, sure, but hardly a requirement.

RS is a good tool, no more and no less.

good luck being a professional musician without theory cause every musicians even great musicians as guthrie govan no matter how good they are they need theory.
Bugera 6262
Squier Showmaster
Richman Custom
Starfire 7
Ibanez EX
Agile Interceptor 725
Behringer GX212 (now works as head)
JOYO JF 01
Kimaxe PJ Bass
#27
Quote by DrRus
The game is actually a very sophisticated solid state amp itself.


Just a point of technicality: it's not a solid state amp. It may have a selection of digital amp models to use but that is in no way the same thing as being a solid state amp.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#28
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Just a point of technicality: it's not a solid state amp. It may have a selection of digital amp models to use but that is in no way the same thing as being a solid state amp.


Haha, you know what I meant!

Ok, it's a nice multifx that you can run through an amplifier, as it is the case with my PC's sound system. Since we are being all technical, I didn't say "guitar" amp, just an amp.
#29
So I decided to check out the new version of the game. The most annoying thing is that the game really sucks at understanding my skill level. I tried to learn Iron maiden "The trooper" for an hour last night and still, it is not giving me the full riffs to play. I have played the single notes in the verse over and over and over again and slowly the game keeps adding more notes one at a time but if I had been able to read the tab I would have been able to play the riff ages ago.

Another annoying thing. I already know a couple of the songs, surely If I play the full song over the single notes the game is bringing up the game should recognise this an bring up the full tab. This seems like common sense to me but now I strum chords all through the song and it still just shows me the root note and perhaps a couple new notes come up throughout the song.

Arg frustrating, not much of a guitar teacher if it slows down your progress. I stick to what I said before, give it to a teen who has some interest in the guitar. They will love it.
#30
lol, a lot of these negative reviews are from people just like you - didn't take the time to learn the tool before using it and complaining about it.

The new version is actually better in this regard - you can max the level of the song right away, you don't have to wait on the game to do it for you. When you start the song - go to riff repeater, select the entire song and move the difficulty slider to 100%, done.

Custom forge DLCs come maxed out by default.
Last edited by DrRus at Jun 28, 2014,
#31
Quote by DrRus
lol, a lot of these negative reviews are from people just like you - didn't take the time to learn the tool before using it and complaining about it.

The new version is actually better in this regard - you can max the level of the song right away, you don't have to wait on the game to do it for you. When you start the song - go to riff repeater, select the entire song and move the difficulty slider to 100%, done.

Custom forge DLCs come maxed out by default.


This ^^^

Just turn the difficulty up to 100% and take the speed down until you can handle it...after you have that nailed then increase the speed gradually.

I also learn songs in stages - play the first part in Riff Repeater, then add the second part. Play the first and second parts and when nailed add the next part. Rinse and repeat until you have the entire song nailed. That's the way I do things anyway.
#32
Quote by Arby911
Theory has never been required to play the guitar. Not now, not ever.

Is it a good idea? IMO, sure, but hardly a requirement.


You might think so now, but I promise you that if you keep playing long enough, there will be a point when you start regretting that you ignored theory and ear training for all those years.