#2
Yes, it is possible.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#3
Quote by theogonia777
Yes, it is possible.

Is this possible to do within Audacity? What program would you recommend?
#4
Ha, no.

I haven't messed with programs like melodyne and Rmix, but I don't think it can happen with most songs without heavy feedback and frequency loss.

Find a guitar sample library, and the midi, and just recreate them, that'd be a lot easier.

At most with EQ and Noise removal you'll just be able to enhance the guitars at the most.
Last edited by stratkat at Mar 19, 2014,
#5
I presume you want to do this because you want to learn songs by ear?

Just use your ear, man. Don't worry about taking stuff out
#6
Quote by E7#9
I presume you want to do this because you want to learn songs by ear?

Just use your ear, man. Don't worry about taking stuff out

You're correct and I think it would be easier too.
#7
No, it is not possible with currently-available technology. Anybody who says otherwise is trolling you, and/or not very knowledgeable on the subject.


The best you can do is use mid-side processing to lower the volume of the stereo centre as much as possible, then create a duplicate of the original track and invert the polarity. Alternatively, you can invert the polarity of one side of the stereo field in the hope of cancelling out some of the more mono centre of the stereo image (that is played back through both speakers) and then create yet another new track of the original and invert the polarity of that (cancelling out the non-centre stuff and hopefully returning your phantom centre.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#8
You can't remove anything from your mp3 but you might be able to find the guitar tracks alone on maybe the internet. search for the song on google and add "guitar track" you might get something like this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7NgtViEcpU
Imagination is more important than knowledge...
It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education.
- Albert Einstein -
Last edited by Bertallica at Mar 19, 2014,
#9
its a master track meaning everything has been blended and mixed together into one track/file. theres no splitting it into separate tracks with an mp3. you can open an EQ on a DAW and try to reduce the frequencies of the other instruments and boost the primary frequency of the guitars but you'll still hear them and you also won't get the guitar fully either. if you find a way i'd like to hear about it, put the explanation on my profile. good luck though
"Then I saw that there was a way to hell, even from the gates of heaven."
-John Bunyan
Last edited by matteo cubano at Mar 19, 2014,
#11
Quote by DisarmGoliath
No, it is not possible with currently-available technology. Anybody who says otherwise is trolling you, and/or not very knowledgeable on the subject.


The best you can do is use mid-side processing to lower the volume of the stereo centre as much as possible, then create a duplicate of the original track and invert the polarity. Alternatively, you can invert the polarity of one side of the stereo field in the hope of cancelling out some of the more mono centre of the stereo image (that is played back through both speakers) and then create yet another new track of the original and invert the polarity of that (cancelling out the non-centre stuff and hopefully returning your phantom centre.


This post made my head explode...
#12
Quote by Bertallica
You can't remove anything from your mp3 but you might be able to find the guitar tracks alone on maybe the internet. search for the song on google and add "guitar track" you might get something like this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7NgtViEcpU

if you have the guitar alone you could reverse the phase on the guitar track and put it next to the original and it would cancel each other out
#13
Yeah, of course you can. Don't listen to everyone putting you down. Just open Audacity and start eliminating frequencies until it's just the guitar left. There's a program that can do this automatically, but you really want to do it on sound bit at a time so it sounds like it's through a good amp in the end.
#14
Quote by ali.guitarkid7
Yeah, of course you can. Don't listen to everyone putting you down. Just open Audacity and start eliminating frequencies until it's just the guitar left. There's a program that can do this automatically, but you really want to do it on sound bit at a time so it sounds like it's through a good amp in the end.

If you have a bigger DAW like FL Studio or Ableton you can make it even easier on yourself. You can throw the song into the DAW and run it through soundgoodizer, camel phat, and sausage fattener. These will boost the frequencies making it easier to pick apart the sound.
ヽ༼ຈل͜ຈ༽ノ raise your dongers ヽ༼ຈل͜ຈ༽ノ
#15
Quote by ali.guitarkid7
Yeah, of course you can. Don't listen to everyone putting you down. Just open Audacity and start eliminating frequencies until it's just the guitar left. There's a program that can do this automatically, but you really want to do it on sound bit at a time so it sounds like it's through a good amp in the end.


Is it your serious claim that guitar occupies a frequency range all to itself?

The fundamental frequencies for guitar run from ~80-1320hz.

Vocal fundamentals are from ~80-1100hz.

So tell me, how does your magical unicorn frequency filter eliminate vocals and leave guitar?
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#16
Quote by jamesiles2004
Hi all, is it possible to remove all but the guitars from a song (.mp3)? Thanks.


No.

You can however use a combination of some of the techniques described and a lot of patience to make the guitars clearer and louder than the rest of the recording. By knowing already what the guitars are playing would allow you to extract them more easily (with a tracking filter) but I suspect that misses the point of why you ask.
#17
Quote by jamesiles2004
You're correct and I think it would be easier too.

It really wouldn't help much at all. Can't you just listen to the track normally and focus on the guitar part? You must know what a guitar sounds like, so it should be easy to pick it out from the other instruments. I've seen a lot of people recommending different programs to slow down a recording to help with learning by ear. I've never used anything like that, but I can see how that would be very helpful. Much more so than what you're proposing.
#18
Quote by Arby911
Is it your serious claim that guitar occupies a frequency range all to itself?

The fundamental frequencies for guitar run from ~80-1320hz.

Vocal fundamentals are from ~80-1100hz.

So tell me, how does your magical unicorn frequency filter eliminate vocals and leave guitar?

Like I said, throw a soundgoodizer, camel phat, and sausage fattener onto the track and you're good to go. Cut away after that.
ヽ༼ຈل͜ຈ༽ノ raise your dongers ヽ༼ຈل͜ຈ༽ノ
#19
Quote by So-Cal
if you have the guitar alone you could reverse the phase on the guitar track and put it next to the original and it would cancel each other out

That's the opposite of what OP wants. If you want a backing track, you go to http://www.guitarbackingtrack.com/
Imagination is more important than knowledge...
It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education.
- Albert Einstein -
#20
Quote by caeser1156
Like I said, throw a soundgoodizer, camel phat, and sausage fattener onto the track and you're good to go. Cut away after that.


So it's your contention that those will enhance the guitar frequencies without touching the vocals?

Yeah.


No.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#21
Quote by Bertallica
You can't remove anything from your mp3


1. open mp3 in Audacity
2. highlight a guitar solo
3. press "Generate -> Silence"
4. export mp3
5. ???
6. profit

And just like that, you have removed something from your mp3.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#22
Quote by Arby911
So it's your contention that those will enhance the guitar frequencies without touching the vocals?

Yeah.


No.

Sure it will. Sausage fattener likes to avoid vocals. There's no sausage to fatten in the vocal track.
ヽ༼ຈل͜ຈ༽ノ raise your dongers ヽ༼ຈل͜ຈ༽ノ
#23
^ caeser, stop it - with product names like that you're in real danger of confusing TS and others into searching for non-existent 'holy grail' software

Quote by Bertallica
That's the opposite of what OP wants. If you want a backing track, you go to http://www.guitarbackingtrack.com/

His point would/should be that you can then play this new track against another copy of the original track, and then flip the polarity of one of them and it would cancel out everything but the guitar now.

In theory, anyway, as there are tons of additional artifacts leftover because it's not as uniform as in an ideal world and the waveforms will be altered so will never completely cancel each other out in the right places etc.

Quote by Blacknoise
This post made my head explode...

That means it's scientifically sound, duh! But yeah, it's more advanced audio engineering talk than the typical stuff most guitarists would mention I suppose (e.g. 'needs more mids!' or 'the sound is too compressed'). If you're interested in the subject, it becomes easier to pick up the terminology
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#24
Quote by caeser1156
If you have a bigger DAW like FL Studio or Ableton you can make it even easier on yourself. You can throw the song into the DAW and run it through soundgoodizer, camel phat, and sausage fattener. These will boost the frequencies making it easier to pick apart the sound.

Gotta be careful though, don't want to turn your house into a giant microwave. You can really hurt people if you over phatten frequencies.
#25
Quote by DisarmGoliath
No, it is not possible with currently-available technology. Anybody who says otherwise is trolling you, and/or not very knowledgeable on the subject.


The best you can do is use mid-side processing to lower the volume of the stereo centre as much as possible, then create a duplicate of the original track and invert the polarity. Alternatively, you can invert the polarity of one side of the stereo field in the hope of cancelling out some of the more mono centre of the stereo image (that is played back through both speakers) and then create yet another new track of the original and invert the polarity of that (cancelling out the non-centre stuff and hopefully returning your phantom centre.

and then you can sometimes mess with very precise frequency analyzers and try to cut out the frequencies you don't like, though this is more likely to make it sound underwater

Quote by caeser1156
Like I said, throw a soundgoodizer, camel phat, and sausage fattener onto the track and you're good to go. Cut away after that.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2R937K_CyI
Last edited by captaincrunk at Mar 19, 2014,
#26
Quote by DisarmGoliath
No, it is not possible with currently-available technology. Anybody who says otherwise is trolling you, and/or not very knowledgeable on the subject.

Options:
- trolling
- not very knowledgeable
- snazz

Actually I made something when I was working at Ircam that could isolate individual (and transpose then add back in!) notes from a mix. Never tried it on anything too noisy but in theory it should work at least as well as melodyne (which is quite well imo if you use it effectively).
It worked quite well but I can't send it to you because it's Ircam property. Also it's about as user-unfriendly as it gets and you basically need a degree in signal processing to figure out how to use it. Just bragging m8.


The basics of it are bandpass filters on all partials (gotta track dem partials) with amplitude enveloping optimised to eliminate other sounds that cross over. I never added it, but some noise reduction techniques at the end could be used to get a pretty clear extracted sound.
Last edited by captainsnazz at Mar 19, 2014,
#27
Yeah, hence the fact I mentioned that sort of thing not being currently/commercially-available I mean, Melodyne only does it in the DNA version, I believe, and that is a bit hit and miss with complex material (and even then, it only currently is effective manipulating individual notes in chords as opposed to an instrument in a mix. There are obviously ways of making complex algorithms that can attempt to spot elements of the waveform that are specific to certain instruments, but generally speaking it isn't possible for TS to do so


(Fair play for your work at IRCAM though, that sounds pretty badass!)
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#28
Quote by Arby911
Is it your serious claim that guitar occupies a frequency range all to itself?

The fundamental frequencies for guitar run from ~80-1320hz.

Vocal fundamentals are from ~80-1100hz.

So tell me, how does your magical unicorn frequency filter eliminate vocals and leave guitar?

Just admit that you don't know anything about MP3s man, you don't want to get in this with me. The last guy that did is now unemployed and busks with an iPad. Back off buddy.
#29
Quote by ali.guitarkid7
Just admit that you don't know anything about MP3s man, you don't want to get in this with me. The last guy that did is now unemployed and busks with an iPad. Back off buddy.


I'll take that risk...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#30
Quote by Bertallica
You can't remove anything from your mp3 but you might be able to find the guitar tracks alone on maybe the internet. search for the song on google and add "guitar track" you might get something like this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7NgtViEcpU


This is the dog's bollocks.

Thanks for posting it, man.
Quote by neidnarb11890
the chinese take-out place my family always ordered from gave you chopsticks, so as a kid it was fun to try & eat with chopsticks
now i just use a fork, 'cuz nothing is fun anymore & i just want to shovel food into my mouth to fill the void
#31
Quote by E7#9
I presume you want to do this because you want to learn songs by ear?

Just use your ear, man. Don't worry about taking stuff out



this

it will be beneficial to your development as a musician and shit yo
banned