#1
Guitar's kind of not been happening

If it isn't pain in the fretting hand/arm, it's pain in the strumming shoulder, rarely is neither an issue. The guitar just feels too far forward I guess. When you can't even play When I Come Around anymore something's not working.

You play 8 years and look back and think, I've really gotten nowhere with this. I terminate most of my practice sessions because I just think I suck and I'll never be pulling awesome solos or shredding or playing live in a band and yet I like the guitar, but so far haven't made that much headway with it

Sorry if this is in the wrong place
#2
have you seen a doctor? I apologise for probably insulting your intelligence but always being in pain isn't going to help with your motivation and it'd be a good idea to seek some professional help (if you haven't already) to make sure there's not something serious wrong, and also just in case there might be a fix for it.
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#3
Pain in your shoulder is probably from playing in casual position instead of classical. Pain in your fretting hand could be a couple things. Your wrist might be angled too much, you might be using too much pressure, you might have your thumb in a bad position, etc.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#4
Quote by Dave_Mc
have you seen a doctor? I apologise for probably insulting your intelligence but always being in pain isn't going to help with your motivation and it'd be a good idea to seek some professional help (if you haven't already) to make sure there's not something serious wrong, and also just in case there might be a fix for it.


Maybe I should do this, although I'm technically not registered with any doc at the moment. It was more towards the end of getting lessons that that happened and my old guitar has felt unplayable ever since :/

Just thinking that this whole journey may have been a waste. On the plus side, on a good day I can produce really good stuff (2 covers and years of lessons tells me that), but seriously, sometimes it feels like the instrument doesn't like me

EDIT: snip, must have been feeling really down to write all that up

Again, sorry for all the negativity guys, don't mean to bring you guys down. Probably my fault though, maybe I should have practiced more in those earlier years, but I could always perform when I needed to (i.e. in lesson)
Last edited by epic FUZZ at Mar 20, 2014,
#5
Quote by Junior#1
Pain in your shoulder is probably from playing in casual position instead of classical. Pain in your fretting hand could be a couple things. Your wrist might be angled too much, you might be using too much pressure, you might have your thumb in a bad position, etc.


You are on the money with that wrist position one. I did have a brief period today where everything was in alignment and just clicked. As for the strumming arm thing I reckon that it's also posture related. Somewhere along the line my posture must have changed
#6
I am a sucky guitar player , but I know in a few other things ive done in life , when I do something well I think I should be able to do it all the time .
Confidence can be a curse , just because u do something well doesn't mean ur past the basics and are too good to ignore them . I do that in almost everything in life , look for the hard reasons im doing something wrong , cause im way too smart for it to be something I already know.
#7
Eight years?
Let me put that in perspective.

Eight years of playing and I was 16 years old.
When you have put in twenty, thirty, forty or more years you'll have perspective.

But deciding that after eight years you haven't gotten far enough, perhaps it is the way you have been pursuing it?
Have a good teacher? That was the single biggest thing for me.

How is your picking?
Picking is what differentiates one guitarist from the next. We can all learn the left hand part for a song, any song...but pick it with the same attack, same rhythm, ultimately the same sound.
#8
Hey Epic,
I hear you. I think the low point for me for how I felt about my playing was around the 6 year mark. Right in the same neighborhood as where you are now. It actually makes sense that this is such a depressing stage. Enough time to say "hey, something should really be happening by now". You've gained enough knowledge that your expectations are higher, and your ear is tuned enough to know what sounds good. It's not like you are a totally beginner and get a lot of accomplishment from small victories like making a C chord. And at the same time, not enough time to really get that comfort with the instrument that comes from 15, 20, 25 years, etc.

For me the reason for my suckage at the 6 year mark was that I hadn't been practicing effectively.

Here's where I'd go from here.
1) Define sucking. What is it about your playing that makes you think that you suck. Make a list of high level things (technical and musical). Like "timing is inaccurate", "bends sound like a dying dog", "vibrato sounds spastic", and so on.
2) Take your list from step 1), but break them down into further detail. Take my "timing is inaccuate" example. Break it down into things like "I'm ok as long as my phrase doesn't start on an upbeat", and "going from 16ths to 8th note triplets throws my timing off".

By the time you get done with step 2, you have broken it down into actual actionable items that you can make progress on in a short amount of time. Pick a couple of them (choose either the weakest or the ones that are most important to you), set yourself a goal for one week out to make noticeable improvement in those things. Then work your butt off all week so you can meet your goals. At the end of the week, make yourself a new set of goals.

I hope this helps. Regarding the pain, I really would see a doc. You don't want to mess around with stuff like that.
#9
Quote by AngryHatter
Eight years?
Let me put that in perspective.

Eight years of playing and I was 16 years old.
When you have put in twenty, thirty, forty or more years you'll have perspective.

But deciding that after eight years you haven't gotten far enough, perhaps it is the way you have been pursuing it?
Have a good teacher? That was the single biggest thing for me.

How is your picking?
Picking is what differentiates one guitarist from the next. We can all learn the left hand part for a song, any song...but pick it with the same attack, same rhythm, ultimately the same sound.


This is most likely very true. I know I haven't practiced as much as I should have and now I'm looking to fix the mistakes that have racked up over the years, but as I said above, I've always been able to perform when I needed to.

I've had multiple teachers, one whom I've been with for the majority of my playing, but since going to uni and the shop where I used to learn moving (I think it's now closed down) I haven't had any lessons. I stalled at that point I guess and now I'm so rusty. As for my strumming, my up strums are messed, I know this, and am sort of working on it slowly (along with correcting errors in my fretting hand).

One thing I won't do though, is give up, guitar has sort of got me in the death grip
#10
Quote by epic FUZZ
This is most likely very true. I know I haven't practiced as much as I should have and now I'm looking to fix the mistakes that have racked up over the years, but as I said above, I've always been able to perform when I needed to.

I've had multiple teachers, one whom I've been with for the majority of my playing, but since going to uni and the shop where I used to learn moving (I think it's now closed down) I haven't had any lessons. I stalled at that point I guess and now I'm so rusty. As for my strumming, my up strums are messed, I know this, and am sort of working on it slowly (along with correcting errors in my fretting hand).

One thing I won't do though, is give up, guitar has sort of got me in the death grip

The last line you said?
Excellent attitude.

Which in itself tells me you will make your way through this.

Look for another teacher. At school should be an easier environment to locate someone who can teach you new things.

Find some DVDs.
I love McLaughlin so his DVDs were a must for me.
#11
Learning the guitar is a struggle there's times in your playing when you think you're great, and then there are times where you wonder why you even picked it up in the first place.. Don't be so hard on yourself dude maybe you just need a break it's refreshing and you'll always come back with a fresh perspective on things and how well you're progressing!


Just remember that it's impossible to master everything on the instrument I learn new things every day not to mention there's just way to many styles and techniques for anyone to really get their hands onto.. Also a question to you is are you practicing correctly? If not then maybe you should learn how to some people use the same approach they've used for a while that's why you might not be seeing improvement you always have to change your approach to learning on the guitar in order to progress.


If anything maybe you should learn a different style or just play songs you enjoy it's all about having fun at the end of the day sometimes even I have to remind my self about this it's the little improvements in your playing that count.
Last edited by Black_devils at Mar 22, 2014,