#1
Hi guys,

quick question, why do i rarely see amplitube mentioned as a good beginner/practice rig? I have it on my ipad and for £13 I find it a really good way to mess around with amps, cabs and pedals, i have some decent computer speakers so i just run the line out into those and bam... loads of sounds at a volume level my neighbours/girlfriend can put up with. plus the whole setup except the speakers fits into the front pocket of a gig bag, and you can easily use garage band or alternative for simple recording.

It doesn't have to be amplitube, any computer based amp modeller basically. Just curious as most people slate the quality of low priced modelling amps/pedals but i rarely see software brought up as an alternative. I know it'll sound pants next to the real thing, but i live in a flat, i can't (not allowed to) have a jcm800 with a 4x12 underneath in the corner of the lounge.

Do people really think its worse than line 6/fender/zoom amp modellers? is it because you still need an input, a computer and some speakers (although i'd think most people have this except the input)? what are people biggest criticisms as a practice tool?

I'd love to get a nice amp, but while i'm playing in my lounge/bedroom where i can't crank the volume and no one needs to hear me except me, then will i get any benefits out of a small solid state or 1/5w tube amp?

Thanks!
#2
I've been practicing at home lately using the app 'JamUp' and really like it to be honest! Selling off my backup/practice amp (Blackstar HT5) as a result now.
I wasn't too impressed with the Amplitube app however (although i only used the free version)
#3
For practice and recording I use Guitar Rig 5 which is very nice. Loads of models and with some good speakers attached to the pc it gives a great sound. For iPad I heard Bias is also really nice.

I have used a Roland Micro cube for practice but I don't like the sound. Very thin because of the small speaker.Now I use a mesa express 5:50+ on the 5 watt setting in my bedroom to practice and even on low volume levels it sounds awesome
#4
I've used that, as well as various other apps on both iPad and iPhone, and they work fine for practice. I suspect the reason you don't see it suggested more is that an iPad is significantly more expensive than a decent practice amp...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#6
The original hype around iPad modeling died off once people realized that the first generation of connection devices were prone to crosstalk with wifi and picked up lots of other interference, which could make them unusable. In a location with a lot of RF noise or WiFi inexpensive connectors were often unusable. The last six months has seen the release of a new generation of excellent ~$100 connectors, that, combined with the second generation of modeling apps (like Bias), will ignite a lot of new interest.
#7
Ok great thanks guys, will also check out bias.

I can see that if you needed to buy an ipad, a decent digital input and the app then of course you spending easy enough for a decent amp. But yeah, i had most of the ingredients already so I'm glad that this isn't just some underlying hatred of the quality of the software.