#1
So hey guys and gals. Wanted to know, what to do with an electric guitar. I bought my girlfriend's guitar, that she got from an auction. Although it sounds good when tuned, after some power chords, it gets out of tune. So I realized that the problem is the tuner heads(low quality), possibly with the metal thingies, that hold the strings in the headstock (not sure of the name). So anyways, any suggestions? Possibly, could you throw a couple of links from ebay what to buy? Thanks a lot .
#2
Need some pictures. A lot of factors could cause the issue. If it has a floating Floyd rose type of bridge it could be the blades. Might need a new nut. Could be tuners.

A few pics of the headstock and body will help.
#3
Quote by Starcounter1
If it has a floating Floyd rose type of bridge it could be the blades.

Yeah, it is a floating bridge. Will upload pictures in couple of minutes.
#4
A higher quality nut is relatively cheap and it easy to do yourself upgrade that is going to help tuning stability.

It might not be your problem - but it's a worthwhile upgrade anyways. And like I said it's pretty affordable.
#6
I'm willing to bet, right out of the gate, that the tuners are not the problem. The vast, vast majority of tuning issues with guitars are down to the user not knowing how to restring it properly. You can make the most basic Strat copy stay in tune just fine if you set everything up correctly.

But until you post detailed pictures of the whole guitar, or at least tell us what kind of guitar it is, there's not much anybody can do.
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#7
Well, Iam not sure actually of the guitar manufacturer, as there is no name either on it or in the documents. It only says elgitarr in the instructions(possibly german-made guitar).
#8
Quote by geduxxx66
Yeah, it is a floating bridge. Will upload pictures in couple of minutes.


That's not a floating bridge, pretty sure. Looks like a standard type fender knock off trem. Only goes down.

I would change the nut first.

Do the strings go flat when they go out of tune, by the way? Those look like heavy strings, are they newly installed? If the guitar was set up for a lighter gauge, and you slapped heavier ones on, it could be messing with the intonation.
Is the bridge pretty flat in relation to the body when you play it?
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Last edited by ryanbwags at Mar 21, 2014,
#9
What do you mean like go flat? You mean like to b(bemol?) if yes, then indeed it goes down. The strings are stock, as provided when buying(guitar was with strings already on).
#10
Hard to say from the given pics. Nut is a good place to start it the culprit is of physical nature, But as MrFlibble stated it may just as likely be the string job/ setup that is the issue. If new strings were put on the guitar did you stretch them slightly before tuneup?
#11
Make sure each string has 3 turns on the tuning pegs.
Adjust the tuning gears so they work smoothly but not loosey goosey.
Lube the nut with graphite or sewing machine oil to prevent binding.
If tail piece movement is the problem you can block it and eliminate the movement.

These basics will bring most guitars into stable tuning.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#12
I myself did not do anything with the strings. Although I will go look up for new strings when I have time. Shall I go for lighter gauge? What material etc?
#13
Quote by Cajundaddy
Make sure each string has 3 turns on the tuning pegs.
Adjust the tuning gears so they work smoothly but not loosey goosey.
Lube the nut with graphite or sewing machine oil to prevent binding.
If tail piece movement is the problem you can block it and eliminate the movement.

These basics will bring most guitars into stable tuning.


Thank you a lot for this information, will check up the strings now. What nut are you talking about concerning it's lubrication?
#18
So from the sound of it, this guitar has never had its strings changed? Right well, unsurprisingly, Stratocasters tend to not stay in tune too well if they have old strings on. Also, those strings are not knotted against the tuner post properly.

Restring the guitar. There is a sticky thread on this forum which has several diagrams showing you how to do this and knot the string against itself at the tuner to prevent it from slipping. Lube the nut. Try to use the same string gauge as the strings that are already on there; this is probably a standard .009 set.
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#20
Quote by Jensen91
*removed*


I would definatelly check it out, if I lived there.. . I live in Europe(Baltics actually) so yeah. Oh btw, I bought the guitar for ~40$ more or less.