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#1
I've had my guitar for quite some time, and I still haven't gotten to anywhere. I finished studying 1 easy song but it took me a while. To be honest, I still don't know every basic things in a guitar.

I want to be good at playing guitar, but I think I lost the motivation, maybe because of the fact that I don't have enough knowledge. Do you think taking guitar lessons will be worth it?
#3
it's completely worth it if you manage to find a good teacher (mind you, a good player isn't necessarily a good teacher), but if you find a bad teacher it can put you off and end up being worse

also depends on the person, some people prefer to learn by themselves, others prefer having teachers
#4
Basically I would say a good teacher is priceless. Try and arrange a few lessons with local teachers and see who you click with. A lot of teachers will have no problem doing a "trial" lesson.
#6
It depends on your goals and if the teacher can help you get there but the answer would be yes without to much to think about it.

As for sounding good I do not agree. It depends on you and your relationship with your guitar and skills to get the results you want. Can you teach yourself and work on the weakspots, stay focused and motivated? Are you a leader or follower kind of person? Can you lead yourself to the desired results? Some guitarplayers can do that very well.
Last edited by anders.jorgense at Mar 22, 2014,
#7
Quote by RicAndrade
it's completely worth it if you manage to find a good teacher (mind you, a good player isn't necessarily a good teacher), but if you find a bad teacher it can put you off and end up being worse

also depends on the person, some people prefer to learn by themselves, others prefer having teachers


+1
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#8
Definitely. I quit for the longest time because I was just fooling around and never really learned anything. I picked up my guitar again and decided that having a teacher would help me a lot. I've learned more in two lessons than I would have ever taught myself. I'm also more excited about guitar than I ever have been. Best decision I ever made.
#9
It seems like your motivation is a bit low, but if you aspire towards being a good guitarplayer I'll definitly advice you to arrange something with a teacher. Myself I just bought a couple of lessons and my motivation has skyrocketed since i really feel the need to improve on a weekly basis and actually have something to show for my next session with my teacher. It's just such a great incitement for me !
#10
I spent 2 years on youtube learning...middle aged male...i was able to play a few songs completely and many intros. i decided to get lessons 3 months ago because i knew i was missing something. Its the little things a teacher can do that you can find on the internet.i am fairly ok now but wish i spent the last 2 years getting lessons from a pro..
#11
Also i think a problem most new guitar players have is tryin to play a song before they can play the guitar...i spent months learning chords an strumming before i really tried a song..i would find intros i could handle then go from there.use it to practice..like horse with no name.Guitar jamz on youtube is the best teacher imo.
#12
I highly doubt that all first grade teachers are "good" teachers, but they all help kids learn to read and write the English language pretty effectively.

with that said, i assure you even a mediocre guitar teacher will be able to help you learn, at the very least, some of the things you would never take to time to learn by yourself.
Quote by BryanChampine
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#13
I don't think you can go wrong with 1-on-1 guitar lessons.

Nothing beats having someone give you instant feedback on what you need do, what you need to change, and hopefully encourage you and push you to go out of your comfort zone.
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#14
Quote by chea_man
I highly doubt that all first grade teachers are "good" teachers, but they all help kids learn to read and write the English language pretty effectively.


Do they?

But seriously, when I talk about bad teachers I mean actively bad. As you said, even a mediocre teacher will likely help if you're at the very beginning and be better than nothing.

The big problem, though, is that there's no objective measure for who's actually a good teacher. A teacher who might help me loads might hold you back (and vice-versa).

Even if a teacher is technically helping, if he/she isn't helping in a way that motivates the pupil it can do more harm than good (i.e. the pupil may just quit).
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#15
Quote by Dave_Mc
Do they?

But seriously, when I talk about bad teachers I mean actively bad. As you said, even a mediocre teacher will likely help if you're at the very beginning and be better than nothing.

The big problem, though, is that there's no objective measure for who's actually a good teacher. A teacher who might help me loads might hold you back (and vice-versa).

Even if a teacher is technically helping, if he/she isn't helping in a way that motivates the pupil it can do more harm than good (i.e. the pupil may just quit).

i do agree with you. i was using some hyperbole i suppose.

however i think just the simple fact that an experienced player (the teacher, ideally lol) can point out problems to a student that the student may never notice. this would help prevent the student from making bad habits in regards to technique that will hold them back.

of course I do have a bias, because i had a tremendous teacher, and i really dont think i would be the player I am today without those lessons.
Quote by BryanChampine
It was like a orgasm in my ear.
Chea_man is the best.
#16
Absolutely, I don't disagree.

I'm just saying it's actually quite a complicated and nuanced question.

My first drum teacher was useless. He was one of those old-school types, and acted like if you made a single mistake you hadn't practised enough. Now admittedly, that was probable true. But still, knowing he was going to jump on me if I made a mistake made me more likely to make one. And he also only taught me boring snare drum or glockenspiel crap when I actually wanted (and needed, for the school band) full drum kit instruction. I also note he very rarely played anything during the lessons. Luckily he retired or I'd probably have quit.

My next drum teacher was awesome. He got me straight on the kit, and he did play in the lessons. And boy, he could play. I'd have gone to the lessons just to listen to him play. And he didn't jump on me if I made a mistake- he knew I was just doing it for fun, and he was ok with that, and most of our lessons revolved around sight-reading and doing new stuff (i.e. not related at all to practising). And which was actually far more useful musically for me, as he was actually trying to stretch me (but in a way i wanted to be stretched). and he also did stuff like samba and bossa nova which was pretty cool. (as i've said before in other threads, a good teacher works with the student; that doesn't mean the teacher should pander to the student, but every pupil is different and tailoring the lessons to the student is a good thing.)

I think there's a moral in there somewhere.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Mar 25, 2014,
#17
I had a teacher for my first few months and he was really useful for getting me on the track with my first riffs. But if I started now, I would just use Internet resources.
#18
Quote by Dave_Mc

My first drum teacher was useless.

haha thats funny. my drum teacher ended up being my guitar teacher!
Quote by BryanChampine
It was like a orgasm in my ear.
Chea_man is the best.
#19
Lol
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#20
Really, how much can you learn in one, maybe two 30 minute sessions a week? I know with my old guitar teacher I had for about a month, it cost 25 bucks a lesson and they were only once a week. I'm sure some of you get better deals, but I can definately learn and teach myself more in several hours on my own everyday vs. learning with a teacher. It depends on your personality though. If you're used to having your hand held or can't do research on your own, then you might need a teacher. Otherwise, spend money and time on your own online resources or dvds.

The hardest part IMO is getting down the theory behind stuff. Learning actual songs isnt very difficult.
#21
Quote by -Lateralus-
Really, how much can you learn in one, maybe two 30 minute sessions a week? I know with my old guitar teacher I had for about a month, it cost 25 bucks a lesson and they were only once a week. I'm sure some of you get better deals, but I can definately learn and teach myself more in several hours on my own everyday vs. learning with a teacher. It depends on your personality though. If you're used to having your hand held or can't do research on your own, then you might need a teacher. Otherwise, spend money and time on your own online resources or dvds.

The hardest part IMO is getting down the theory behind stuff. Learning actual songs isnt very difficult.


A teacher isn't supposed to do the work for you, you have 30 minute - 1 hour sessions because in that time you can go over what you've practiced, point out what you're doing wrong, talk about what's going on in theory, discuss where you are and where you're going, then the student goes away and practices.

Teaching like that you give your student direction and guidance, correcting them if they do something wrong and so on; you can't just spend an hour a week together and somehow all the learning and practice happens in that space.
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#22
Speaking of lessons......


Mines today!


But yeah it helps a lot if you have a GOOD teacher.
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#23
So do you guys think doing electric guitar for guitar lessons as a starter is good? I mean, I know some about chord changes, but only know little about chord names, I already know 1 easy song. I'm just thinking that because electric is more complex than acoustic, maybe if I start with learning electric, and I progress throughout the lesson, playing acoustic songs won't be hard for me.

Does it make any sense, or should I start at acoustic?
#24
Quote by decapitator15
So do you guys think doing electric guitar for guitar lessons as a starter is good? I mean, I know some about chord changes, but only know little about chord names, I already know 1 easy song. I'm just thinking that because electric is more complex than acoustic, maybe if I start with learning electric, and I progress throughout the lesson, playing acoustic songs won't be hard for me.

Does it make any sense, or should I start at acoustic?


It depends where you want to end up.

"Acoustic" and "electric" don't really define how difficult anything is. With both you can go from extremely simple things to playing so complex it'll blow your mind, it's just a question of the sounds you want to end up making.

That's really what you should ask yourself: why are you playing guitar?

Also: if you can find a good teacher it's always worth the money. If you can find a good teacher.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#25
Quote by -Lateralus-
Really, how much can you learn in one, maybe two 30 minute sessions a week? I know with my old guitar teacher I had for about a month, it cost 25 bucks a lesson and they were only once a week. I'm sure some of you get better deals, but I can definately learn and teach myself more in several hours on my own everyday vs. learning with a teacher. It depends on your personality though. If you're used to having your hand held or can't do research on your own, then you might need a teacher. Otherwise, spend money and time on your own online resources or dvds.

The hardest part IMO is getting down the theory behind stuff. Learning actual songs isnt very difficult.


I've been playing 5 years and I've recently started going back to guitar lessons. 30 minutes is more than enough. I think an hour may be good if you're just starting out, but even then probably not.
I have him as a teacher for the sole purpose of teaching me theory very in depth to assist with songwriting. Sure, I could learn this on the internet, but it is very very difficult to stay motivated and have direction when learning theory, so my teacher helps me significantly with that. If i never had a teacher i still wouldn't even know all my major and minor chords.
There's a lot you can take away from 30 minutes with a good teacher. A couple times I've even postponed my next lesson until 2 weeks later because I've had to take in a lot and to balance what i learned in my lesson with what I'm learning outside of my lesson.

The only thing I can agree with you on is that learning songs isn't very difficult no. If you have a teacher just teaching you songs then you probably shouldn't have that teacher.
#26
The amount of information my teacher imparted in one hour took YEARS to digest.
Best money spent, musically speaking.

Paramount is having a teacher than has something you wish to learn and that they also have the ability to explain it to you.
#27
Quote by decapitator15
So do you guys think doing electric guitar for guitar lessons as a starter is good? I mean, I know some about chord changes, but only know little about chord names, I already know 1 easy song. I'm just thinking that because electric is more complex than acoustic, maybe if I start with learning electric, and I progress throughout the lesson, playing acoustic songs won't be hard for me.

Does it make any sense, or should I start at acoustic?


electric isn't more complex than acoustic. if you want to play electric, learn electric.

as zaphod says, if you can find a good teacher, it's probably worth it.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#28
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
A teacher isn't supposed to do the work for you, you have 30 minute - 1 hour sessions because in that time you can go over what you've practiced, point out what you're doing wrong, talk about what's going on in theory, discuss where you are and where you're going, then the student goes away and practices.

Teaching like that you give your student direction and guidance, correcting them if they do something wrong and so on; you can't just spend an hour a week together and somehow all the learning and practice happens in that space.


True, but within that week you can also develop bad habits which the teacher may not be able to notice or correct in a 30 min session or find within that session. 30 mins isn't a lot of time when you consider you have to tune your guitar, then practice a few scales or riffs and then he has to determine whats wrong with them. And if he doesn't catch them in that session, then its possibly 2 weeks you are doing wrong, then it could turn to 3 weeks, etc. etc.

I think if you monitor yourself real time you'll actually be better off than if you practice for a week after your teacher teaches you, but you mess up and have to completely undo it the next week. You basically lose 2 weeks for every mistake you make. And if he gives you more to learn, now you have to do both that and unlearn your bad habits from last week.

See where I am going with this? 30 mins isnt even enough for a normal college math class lesson. Most are an hour and 15 minutes twice a week. Guitars no different...
#29
^ I completely disagree with everything you've said.

And what student doesn't tune before a lesson, and what teacher will make you practice scales and riffs, and what teacher can't notice bad habits?

I've had 3 different teachers throughout my time. I've had a shit one, a good one and a fantastic one. Only a shit teacher will waste your time in 30minutes.
#30
Quote by vayne92
^ I completely disagree with everything you've said.

And what student doesn't tune before a lesson, and what teacher will make you practice scales and riffs, and what teacher can't notice bad habits?

I've had 3 different teachers throughout my time. I've had a shit one, a good one and a fantastic one. Only a shit teacher will waste your time in 30minutes.


Im saying it may take a bit to tune if you are bringing your guitar. Ive only had one guitar teacher, but when I went to his house to practice, it took me a bit to tune my guitar due to the heat/transporting it/getting it out of the bag, etc. You waste a few minutes right. As for the rest, scales and riffs are normally a part of practice. Why would you not practice them?

How can you notice a bad habit if you don't practice it? Exactly, you can't practice everything you learn or you might learn on your own within 30 minutes.

I'm definately not saying a guitar teacher isn't worth it if you find one you like, but there is so much stuff on the internet that you can save a ton of money and essentially just teach yourself. Its like colleges now. Legit colleges have all their curriculum online now so you don't have to waste time commuting, buying books (they provide them online), and all the other hassle. You get material from a teacher online and you do the rest. Same with guitar.
Last edited by -Lateralus- at Mar 29, 2014,
#31
If money isn't of a concern I'm sure everyone can objectively agree that a GOOD teacher is worth it. A bad teacher I can agree is not really worth the time and money. It's just a matter of finding a good teacher.
#32
Quote by -Lateralus-
True, but within that week you can also develop bad habits which the teacher may not be able to notice or correct in a 30 min session or find within that session. 30 mins isn't a lot of time when you consider you have to tune your guitar, then practice a few scales or riffs and then he has to determine whats wrong with them. And if he doesn't catch them in that session, then its possibly 2 weeks you are doing wrong, then it could turn to 3 weeks, etc. etc.

I think if you monitor yourself real time you'll actually be better off than if you practice for a week after your teacher teaches you, but you mess up and have to completely undo it the next week. You basically lose 2 weeks for every mistake you make. And if he gives you more to learn, now you have to do both that and unlearn your bad habits from last week.

See where I am going with this? 30 mins isnt even enough for a normal college math class lesson. Most are an hour and 15 minutes twice a week. Guitars no different...


30 minutes is a short lesson anyway, if I were to teach I would make sure that lessons were at least 45 minutes: you can get a fair bit done in that time.

I see where you're going... but you're wrong. A lesson with a guitar teacher isn't like a college class: you don't sit there and run exercises, you spend the time working out and being told what you need to do in order to improve and reach your goals.

Quote by -Lateralus-
Im saying it may take a bit to tune if you are bringing your guitar. Ive only had one guitar teacher, but when I went to his house to practice, it took me a bit to tune my guitar due to the heat/transporting it/getting it out of the bag, etc. You waste a few minutes right. As for the rest, scales and riffs are normally a part of practice. Why would you not practice them?

How can you notice a bad habit if you don't practice it? Exactly, you can't practice everything you learn or you might learn on your own within 30 minutes.

I'm definately not saying a guitar teacher isn't worth it if you find one you like, but there is so much stuff on the internet that you can save a ton of money and essentially just teach yourself. Its like colleges now. Legit colleges have all their curriculum online now so you don't have to waste time commuting, buying books (they provide them online), and all the other hassle. You get material from a teacher online and you do the rest. Same with guitar.


You're fundamentally misunderstanding what the lesson time is for and your language betrays that: you say that when you got to your teachers' place to practice... bu you're not supposed to practice there. That's not what the time and space are for, you get to your teacher, run through what you have been practising two or three times so your teacher can get their head around where you are and guide you until the next session. You spend the time in between practising and self-monitoring as well because your teacher should be pointing out things you need to work on and telling you how to work on them.

What I'm pretty sure you're going to say is that this is the kind of thing you get from video and such on youtube or whatever... but you don't get it properly tailored to you or what you want to do. Having a person there to talk to in person, to direct you based exactly on what you're doing right or wrong and where you want to end up. That kind of personalisation and guidance you get from a real, and good, teacher is worth its weight in gold.

Even now, if I could afford lessons and find a good teacher... I would be taking lessons.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
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Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Mar 29, 2014,
#33
Question, again, so how long did you guys take guitar lessons? I'm planning on doing it on summer vacation. Do you guys think 2 months is enough?
#34
Quote by decapitator15
Question, again, so how long did you guys take guitar lessons? I'm planning on doing it on summer vacation. Do you guys think 2 months is enough?


Learning is a lifelong process; 2 months might be enough time for something but not much of anything meaningful.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#36
Quote by Freepower
^ I think 2 months is definitely enough to know if you want more lessons from the same teacher. ^^


...

Yeah, ok, that's a meaningful thing
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#37
Getting a good guitar teacher is easily one of the best investments you can ever put into guitar.

on the topic of how long to have a teacher, I would say (assuming money is no object) until you no longer feel the benefits of going to a guitar teacher, you answered the questions you needed answered and you got down the techniques you wanted to figure out.
Last edited by Blicer at Mar 31, 2014,
#39
As a beginner who knows a few chords and riffs, I could teach someone more than my old guitar teacher did. Give it a try but if your guitar teacher tries showing off his soling skills off within 5 minutes of the lesson, leave.
#40
Quote by cb96
Give it a try but if your guitar teacher tries showing off his soling skills off within 5 minutes of the lesson, leave.




Was your guitar teacher 16 years old or something?
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