#1
Hey peeps,
I'm looking for a new acoustic/a. electric guitar. I can't figure out which one to buy. I've had my only acoustic for years now, it was a gift from when I was little. I don't really play gigs (at least at the moment) but I am starting to record stuff. I have an interface and mics, so I don't know if I'd be better off with A or EA. Pluggin' it in or not.
I've never had an EA so I don't know how well they sound when not plugged in. I want to be able to play like for friends and campfires and all that corny stuff so I don't know if it being EA would hinder that live close and personal sound.

So yeaaaah, you're thoughts on the matter are greatly appreciated.

Thanks to everyone.
#2
if one is spending the same money on either an acoustic or an acoustic electric, you can get a better quality guitar if you go with a straight acoustic because you won't be paying for the electronics. you can always add electronics later.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#3
No need to buy an acoustic electric if you don't need to play it loud. For the same price, you can get a better acoustic-only guitar. You can add a transducer later if you need to. Based on your needs, you only need an acoustic.

Personally, I prefer adding the electronics later so I can choose what I like.
Last edited by royc at Mar 23, 2014,
#4
And here's the dissenting vote. Buy an acoustic electric or nothing.

And as for, "putting electronics in later", we get people crying here all the time. They buy an acoustic, and six months months later, they're back. "What kind of pickup can I buy, I only have fifty bucks"?

And the answer is, in the price range you're going to be looking at, you can't retrofit it, for the price the factory, which BTW, does a better job, gives it to you in the first place.

And the plugged in sound you ask? It will still sound like your guitar, but bigger, badder, and on steroids.

In in the case of the majority of mid priced instruments, the electronics and cutaway come as a package. And face it, a cutaway doesn't really hurt the sound, and looks cool as hell.
#5
I'm going to give a +1 to Captaincranky. While I agree with you other guys to a certain extent, that argument only really comes into it when you're looking at high end premium kit.

HOWEVER....now I'm going to risk contradicting myself. TS - you said you wanted the electrics so you could record yourself, but you already have mics & interface? If that is your only reason for wanting built in electrics, just a plain acoustic will do. More often than not acoustics sound best when recorded with a mic, electrocoustics are only really needed if you want to plug into a PA at a concert.

What are your long term goals? Do you just want the ability to record and play for friends? A plain old acoustic will do for that. If you think in the longer term you'll want to play larger venues and hook up to a PA, the electrocoustic is worth the investment.
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#6
Quote by Captaincranky
And the plugged in sound you ask? It will still sound like your guitar, but bigger, badder, and on steroids.


It will sound bigger, but it will not always sound like your guitar. I have heard mid-priced acoustic-electrics that sound good unplugged, but sound bad to my ears when plugged. It is more expensive to install your own transducers, but it lets you choose the one that sounds good to your ears.

In his specific case, I see no need for his acoustic to be amplified, so my recommendation is to spend his money on an acoustic that sounds better unplugged compared to a similarly priced acoustic-electric. If what he needs is something that needs to be plugged, then I will recommend him to go ahead and buy an acoustic-electric guitar.
Last edited by royc at Mar 23, 2014,
#7
Quote by royc
It will sound bigger, but it will not always sound like your guitar. I have heard mid-priced acoustic-electrics that sound good unplugged, but sound bad to my ears when plugged. It is more expensive to install your own transducers, but it lets you choose the one that sounds good to your ears.
Right, and you can keep buying transducers on a trial and error basis, install them and keep retuning them? Most of of us wouldn't have the hubris to do that. I suspect that doesn't really apply to you though.

I have found, as have many others, that a plug in and some light ambiance effects can make a passable guitar sound quite decent, and not the reverse way you seem to believe.

Quote by royc
In his specific case, I see no need for his acoustic to be amplified, so my recommendation is to spend his money on an acoustic that sounds better unplugged compared to a similarly priced acoustic-electric. If what he needs is something that needs to be plugged, then I will recommend him to go ahead and buy an acoustic-electric guitar.
So, you're in charge of his wallet, and you're going to be telling him what to buy, when to buy it, and how much to pay for it? I guess the rest of us should take a few months off.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 24, 2014,
#8
Quote by Captaincranky
Right, and you can keep buying transducers on a trial and error basis, install them and keep retuning them? Most of of us wouldn't have the hubris to do that. I suspect that doesn't really apply to you though.

I have found, as have many others, that a plug in and some light ambiance effects can make a passable guitar sound quite decent, and not the reverse way you seem to believe.

So, you're in charge of his wallet, and you're going to be telling him what to buy, when to buy it, and how much to pay for it? I guess the rest of us should take a few months off.


No, I did not go through trial and error to find the transducer that I like. I asked what transducer was used in the guitar that I heard and like then I bought it. Rashiu asked for our thoughts so I see no harm in expressing mine.

I agree on passable guitar sound for built-in transducers, but not on your original argument re: "It will still sound like your guitar". I have tried different brands of transducers, but not all sounds similar to the unplugged guitar.

He was specifically asking if he should buy an acoustic or an acoustic-electric. I gave a recommendation based on what I see is his current need. I believe that we are free to give our recommendations when asked, but it is up to Rashiu to decide what to buy. If he says that he doesn't like my ideas then I have no problem with that.
#9
one can always buy a pure western mini and not worry about the perfect electronics. after all, it's not like you get to choose which electronics go into an acoustic-electric - ya get what ya get, and rarely are they wonderful.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#10
People who are really serious about reproducing the dulcet tones of their favorite axe generally use a microphone.
This can work well in a home-recording environment.... Depending on what you want and how much you want to spend. You can even get USB mics that plug into your computer or interfaces that allow recording into your i-device.

Acoustic-electrics are handy... Plug 'em in and no worries. For performing, they allow freedom of movement and also control from the guitar... With an add-on transducer, you needs must make your adjustments at the amp or pre-amp if you go that route.
Depends what you do on stage.
Most pros use expensive wireless setups and have very involved sound-reinforcement equipment and well-trained guys to set the whole thing up.
A solo musician playing clubs has to do all this himself.
The audience likely doesn't give a damn what you're playing or how it sounds as long as it's in tune and you're putting on a decent show.

If you just want to produce recordings in your bedroom and you really want good reproduction... I'd consider a mic. Otherwise, for occasional gigging and recording... An acoustic/electric is certainly handy.
Experiment....