#1
I want to start using Amp Modellers/Multi-effects live but am unsure of what Power Amp to get.

Can anyone recommend me a good one? Also does the Power amp colour the tone at all? Any help is appreciated as I am a gear noob

Budget: Upto £250
New or used: Either
Location: Hertfordshire, UK
Amp modeller/multi-effects: POD HD500
Last edited by Afroboy267 at Mar 23, 2014,
#3
Quote by Afroboy267
I'm thinking of getting the Peavey PV1500 power amp, would this be a good choice?


The Peavey weighs 45 lbs and provides up to 1000W bridged, mono and runs (at Sweetwater) about $469.

I use a Carvin HD1500 that weighs 9 lbs and provides up to 1400W bridged, mono (4 ohms) or 900W bridged, mono (8 ohms) and runs (direct from Carvin) $299. The difference here is that the Carvin is a fairly standard and basic Class D, while the Peavey is an older toroidal design.
#4
Quote by Afroboy267
I want to start using Amp Modellers/Multi-effects live but am unsure of what Power Amp to get.

Can anyone recommend me a good one? Also does the Power amp colour the tone at all? Any help is appreciated as I am a gear noob


A power amp will not (should not) color the tone. It should provide flat response over a very wide range with little variance and almost no harmonic distortion. Any coloration is supposed to be provided by your HD500.

If you choose speakers that are also mostly uncolored (PA type or wide-range like the Carvin LS-1503), then any patches that you create on your HD500 will be able to be run into any other uncolored speaker (from arena PA to small powered studio monitor or studio-quality headphones) fairly unchanged. If you choose a guitar speaker (which usually has a mids hump in the 1000-2000Hz area, and which drops off around 110Hz and around 4000Hz), you'll definitely experience coloration, and it will be more difficult to set your rig up when you want to use a different output medium.
#5
Quote by Afroboy267
Can anyone recommend me a good one? Also does the Power amp colour the tone at all? Any help is appreciated as I am a gear noob
What do you wanna power?
A power amp shouldn't color the tone theoretically, but bad ones usually make it worse and tube amps sound a bit warmer, generally.

That's a big power amp you have your eyes on you know?
You may wanna look into something smaller.
Not a carvin HD1500 though.
Unless you wanna power up a fairly big pa system, you don't need that much power.
Plus the peavey will probably sound better, I don't trust cheap digital power amps for shit.

Anyway, as stated, you may wither get a guitar cabinet or some pa cabinets.
The difference would simply be that with the pa cabinets, which shouldn't color the sound, you'd need to engage the (guitar) cab simulation on the pod, while if you use a guitar cab you may disengage that.
I mean you could leave it on but you'd get a pretty drastic modification of your sound so I'd rather not do that.

I'd get a guitar cab anyway since you wanna use that for guitars.
If you think you may need pa stuff get it by any means, though good guitar stuff is a lot cheaper than good pa stuff and you look like you wouldn't really use the pa part.

As for the amp I'd say you'll be good with a yamaha PS2500 or one of the bigger ones of the series if you wanna power up good pa stuff.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
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Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
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#6
Thanks for the replies.

Basically I have a Marshall 1960a 4x12 and I want to run my Line 6 POD HD500 into it for gigs. I don't need to use it for a PA system.

Spambot would the PS2500 be good for this use?
#7
The PS2500 will have power aplenty for that.
So yeah, be careful about how much you turn the volume up - the PS2500 puts out something like 275w per channel @ 8ohm, which is about twice the power the cab is capable of handling.
I'd use that, yeah, though you may wanna keep it real cheap and get something like a couple of these and use one for each channel.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
Last edited by Spambot_2 at Mar 24, 2014,
#8
Quote by Spambot_2
The PS2500 will have power aplenty for that.
So yeah, be careful about how much you turn the volume up - the PS2500 puts out something like 275w per channel @ 8ohm, which is about twice the power the cab is capable of handling.
I'd use that, yeah, though you may wanna keep it real cheap and get something like a couple of these and use one for each channel.

Ahh ok, thanks for the info. Sorry to be a noob but I've just got a couple more questions.

1) Are the ones used for guitar rigs the same as PA power amps?
2) What do you mean by channel? Surely there's only 1 channel going from the HD500 to the power amp?
3) Also my cab is 4 or 16ohm mono input or 8ohm stereo input, I'm gonna be using 8ohm cabs in the studio but I will need a power amp that has either a 4 or 16ohm output for this cab as well. My old 6505+ could switch between 4, 8 and 16. Do most power amps have this?

My 6505+ was 120w and was extremely loud, was this probably because it had a tube power amp? Wouldn't this be the right thing for me to get? 100w @ 4ohm and 200w @ 8ohm
http://www.gak.co.uk/en/samson-servo-200-power-amplifier/6151
Last edited by Afroboy267 at Mar 24, 2014,
#9
Well we all gotta learn somewhere.

1. they're all power amps, and you can't change a lot of stuff in power amps.
You can change the operating class and the connections and the quality, but all of the three don't have anything to do with the application.
Well the first and the third maybe, but it's not like you can't use either in any given situation as long as you can match the impedance of the amp and the cab you're plugging it into.
So, bottom line, they're the same thing.

2. well a channel is a separate stream of audio informations.
Mono is one channel, stereo is left plus right and each one is a channel, 5.1 sorround is lotsa stuff and each one is a channel, so you have six in that case.
The pod has stereo output so you may as well combine a couple sounds to get a fuller sound, or you could power up two different cabs if you wanted to.
Two cables would go from the pod to the amp and two more cables from the power amp to the cab(s).

3. The reason why you can switch between output impedances in your amp is that it has a tube power amp, and tube power amps have output transformers to get the tension back down to earth.
So since you loose power when mismatching the impedance (input's higher than output's), you may as well put there a simple impedance switch since you already have yourself an output transformer.
With solid state power amps though you don't need output transformers, so there's a minimum impedance the cab you plug it in has to have, because when you double the input impedance you loose half of your power, and when you halve the input impedance (below the output impedance of your amp) you get twice the power from your amp.
Great right?
Well not really.
Doing so, the power amp will try to put out more power than it's capable of and you'll fry the output transistors, resulting in an expensive but really effective door blocker.

So, to summarize, tube power amps have impedance switch and solid state power amps don't because they don't need it.

4. your amp was extremely loud because you didn't turn the volume knob low enough.
Seriously, for ****'s sake, why wouldn't you turn the volume down?

You may get that power amp but it'll probably sound bad.
Plus, these ratings don't convince me at all.

See, the reason why guitarists think tube amps are louder than solid state amps is that manufacturers often state the latters' power in peak power, while tube amps are rated at RMS power.
If you wanna know about that, go and look them up on wikipedia, but put simply, RMS means medium level and it's half of the peak power.
The peak power is the maximum power an amplifier can put out without distorting the signal.
So, if you have a tube amp rated at 30w and a solid state amp rated at 30w, the tube one is gonna be louder because it's twice as big.
Also, tubes make a more pleasant sound when overdriven, and that can get you to turn up your volume even if you get distortion, while you'll hardly do that with an amp using transistors.

It has become common among cheap pa stuff manufacturers to use the peak rating when advertising stuff too, but in this case they give you both: 100w per channel @ 4ohm, so 200w at @ 4ohm, and 200w @ 8ohm.
Though, the first rating is probably RMS and the second is peak.

Also, given the cheapness and the shadyness, I don't think it's gonna sound good.
I mean you could use it, but if you really wanna spend little money get a Lepai 2020a+.
I'd get the yamaha anyway, you never know when you'll need to power up some bigger stuff.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
Last edited by Spambot_2 at Mar 25, 2014,
#11
Quote by Spambot_2

Plus, these ratings don't convince me at all.

See, the reason why guitarists think tube amps are louder than solid state amps is that manufacturers often state the latters' power in peak power, while tube amps are rated at RMS power.
If you wanna know about that, go and look them up on wikipedia, but put simply, RMS means medium level and it's half of the peak power.
The peak power is the maximum power an amplifier can put out without distorting the signal.
So, if you have a tube amp rated at 30w and a solid state amp rated at 30w, the tube one is gonna be louder because it's twice as big.
Also, tubes make a more pleasant sound when overdriven, and that can get you to turn up your volume even if you get distortion, while you'll hardly do that with an amp using transistors.

It has become common among cheap pa stuff manufacturers to use the peak rating when advertising stuff too, but in this case they give you both: 100w per channel @ 4ohm, so 200w at @ 4ohm, and 200w @ 8ohm.
Though, the first rating is probably RMS and the second is peak.


The reputable companies will usually state what power rating method they're using, and most will use RMS. There's also "program" and "peak", which are often two to four times the RMS rating. Some reputable companies will ALSO state program and peak simply to provide a basis of comparison to the less-reputable companies <G>.

Your evaluation of tube vs solid state power is inaccurate. It's not a question of RMS vs. peak. Nor are guitar tube amps "twice as big." Nothing of the sort. Guitar amps usually state their power as RMS @ XXX THD (if they state a distortion rating at all). Guitar amps will often allow up to 10% harmonic distortion in their ratings, while most solid state amps (particularly those used for higher-end PA work) will have harmonic distortion ratings a couple of orders of magnitude lower (.01%, for example). An amplifier (tube or solid state) can frequently put out up to double their rated power, but they'll begin to move into greater levels of distortion. For a tube *guitar* amp, that can be pleasant. Some solid state amps sound less pleasant in distortion (though that's NOT true across the board; that sentiment is left over from the early '70's). In short, a watt is a watt.
#12
Quote by Spambot_2
Well we all gotta learn somewhere.

1. they're all power amps, and you can't change a lot of stuff in power amps.
You can change the operating class and the connections and the quality, but all of the three don't have anything to do with the application.
Well the first and the third maybe, but it's not like you can't use either in any given situation as long as you can match the impedance of the amp and the cab you're plugging it into.
So, bottom line, they're the same thing.

2. well a channel is a separate stream of audio informations.
Mono is one channel, stereo is left plus right and each one is a channel, 5.1 sorround is lotsa stuff and each one is a channel, so you have six in that case.
The pod has stereo output so you may as well combine a couple sounds to get a fuller sound, or you could power up two different cabs if you wanted to.
Two cables would go from the pod to the amp and two more cables from the power amp to the cab(s).

3. The reason why you can switch between output impedances in your amp is that it has a tube power amp, and tube power amps have output transformers to get the tension back down to earth.
So since you loose power when mismatching the impedance (input's higher than output's), you may as well put there a simple impedance switch since you already have yourself an output transformer.
With solid state power amps though you don't need output transformers, so there's a minimum impedance the cab you plug it in has to have, because when you double the output impedance you loose half of your power, and when you halve the input impedance (below the output impedance of your amp) you get twice the power from your amp.
Great right?
Well not really.
Doing so, the power amp will try to put out more power than it's capable of and you'll fry the output transistors, resulting in an expensive but really effective door blocker.

So, to summarize, tube power amps have impedance switch and solid state power amps don't because they don't need it.

4. your amp was extremely loud because you didn't turn the volume knob low enough.
Seriously, for ****'s sake, why wouldn't you turn the volume down?

You may get that power amp but it'll probably sound bad.
Plus, these ratings don't convince me at all.

See, the reason why guitarists think tube amps are louder than solid state amps is that manufacturers often state the latters' power in peak power, while tube amps are rated at RMS power.
If you wanna know about that, go and look them up on wikipedia, but put simply, RMS means medium level and it's half of the peak power.
The peak power is the maximum power an amplifier can put out without distorting the signal.
So, if you have a tube amp rated at 30w and a solid state amp rated at 30w, the tube one is gonna be louder because it's twice as big.
Also, tubes make a more pleasant sound when overdriven, and that can get you to turn up your volume even if you get distortion, while you'll hardly do that with an amp using transistors.

It has become common among cheap pa stuff manufacturers to use the peak rating when advertising stuff too, but in this case they give you both: 100w per channel @ 4ohm, so 200w at @ 4ohm, and 200w @ 8ohm.
Though, the first rating is probably RMS and the second is peak.

Also, given the cheapness and the shadyness, I don't think it's gonna sound good.
I mean you could use it, but if you really wanna spend little money get a Lepai 2020a+.
I'd get the yamaha anyway, you never know when you'll need to power up some bigger stuff.


Just. ****ing. STOP!

Look, I know you're trying to help, but mixing misinformation in is NOT helpful. You don't understand amp design, your understanding of impedance is marginal, you COMPLETELY don't understand peak, peak to peak and RMS, you haven't the foggiest idea how amps are rated...

Just answer the questions you KNOW the answers to, leave the rest of them for someone else.

FFS!

“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#13
Quote by Spambot_2
What do you wanna power?
A power amp shouldn't color the tone theoretically, but bad ones usually make it worse and tube amps sound a bit warmer, generally.

That's a big power amp you have your eyes on you know?
You may wanna look into something smaller.
Not a carvin HD1500 though.
Unless you wanna power up a fairly big pa system, you don't need that much power.
Plus the peavey will probably sound better, I don't trust cheap digital power amps for shit.

I'd get a guitar cab anyway since you wanna use that for guitars.
If you think you may need pa stuff get it by any means, though good guitar stuff is a lot cheaper than good pa stuff and you look like you wouldn't really use the pa part.

As for the amp I'd say you'll be good with a yamaha PS2500 or one of the bigger ones of the series if you wanna power up good pa stuff.


I've used the Pod with Atomic Reactors -- I have a pair of the 112-18s (18w EL84-based) and one of the 212-50 (6L6 50W), and still use all three. I've also used it with a Carvin TS-100 (50W/50W stereo tube power amp, 100W bridged mono) and still do, occasionally. I can tell you categorically that tube power amps don't warm anything up unless they're specifically designed to do that.

1500W sounds like crazy power, but it's essentially just a whole lot of headroom. The old joke about a 100W Marshall is that as you get louder, you lose bottom end. The reason is that the power is being used to produce midrange volume and there's really nothing left for bottom-end reproduction. If you've got a brain in your head and you pay attention to your volume, you're not going to blow speakers. You can get smaller power levels if you prefer, but it won't cost you much less.

The Peavey offers nothing that the Carvin (or other similar power amp) doesn't provide and I've found the Carvin to be easily as reliable as most other brands. You're welcome to spend more money and carry more weight if you wish. I'm not promoting any particular brand, just noting what's out there and what I use.

My first run-through with a Pod was to simply use it into the FX loop return of a standard guitar amp. That worked fine, but you'll usually not want to use the cabinet emulations available on the Pod. That eliminated my having to find a separate power amp, and you have the option of simply using the amp's normal input as well. In fact, you can run both if you wish with the simple addition of an ABY box.

But it's not "better" using a guitar amp or a guitar speaker cabinet.

Your Marshall 1960A weighs 75-100 lbs (depending on the speaker weights, of course).
It's a bulky 30x30x14 or so. It's a struggle to single-hand up a flight of stairs and it barely fits in the back seat of a Honda Civic <G>. It produces a fairly limited range of about 110Hz to 4000Hz, and while some of the greatest rock music around has been produced from them, modern tech gives you more.

You can go lower and higher and louder and you can do it while carting around something that's lighter and smaller. The Pod gives you that option (because it emulates all those heavy tube amp heads and those heavy cabinets for you). The cabs I use are 26" high x 20" wide x 16.75" deep, weigh in around 40-45 lbs, can be used on a tilt (see the photo) or can be run vertically or horizontally, but as you'll see, the basic speaker configuration is similar to that Carvin LS-1503. They're out of your current budget, but they'll go extremely low (40Hz) without farting out and very high (18Khz) if you've got any of that content in your output. And they'll easily handle 900W each, but they sound great at low volumes as well. They don't beam ice-pick treble the way a 4x12 will; they've got great, clean dispersion up and down the audio spectrum.

#14
Quote by Afroboy267
I want to start using Amp Modellers/Multi-effects live but am unsure of what Power Amp to get.

Can anyone recommend me a good one? Also does the Power amp colour the tone at all? Any help is appreciated as I am a gear noob


I know you mentioned that you have a 1960A cab now -- do you also already have a head to go with it?
#15
@dspellman
Didn't know about the program power thing, sorry about that.

As for the "reputable companies" thing I'm with you, though I have never seen any more information than "Xw" given by a manufacturer referring to a guitar amp.
As for the ratings of the samson not convincing me, sorry again, I overlooked the specs sheet and stopped at the features written on the retailer's page TS linked.

The twice as big thing was because as I stated, in different cases I've seen, solid state tube amps are actually rated at Xw peak while tube amps are rated at Xw RMS (or program, now I'm not really sure about that :P).
So, the 30w solid state amp vs. 30w tube amp with the latter being twice as powerful than the first wanted to mean that the tube amp is (about) twice as big because it's 30w RMS, vs. the transistor amp rated at 30w peak.

I mistaken one doubling for one halving, I corrected the previous post.

I can't really find any other flaw.
I know (well I think I do know) how amps are rated, but when talking about guitar amps the whole rating thing looses lotsa importance because of the difference in amps designs and the fact that nobody gives the complete ratings.
I at least have never seen a guitar amp rated at 50w RMS driven continuously into 4 ohms with less than 0.1% THD from 20Hz to 20kHz, nor anything coming anywhere close to that.

I also stopped at the reseller's page TS linked and pre-emptively judged that power amp, sorry about that.

Anyway, please correct me if I'm wrong about anything else 'cause I couldn't find anything else myself.

Quote by dspellman
Your Marshall 1960A weighs 75-100 lbs (depending on the speaker weights, of course).
It's a bulky 30x30x14 or so. It's a struggle to single-hand up a flight of stairs and it barely fits in the back seat of a Honda Civic <G>. It produces a fairly limited range of about 110Hz to 4000Hz, and while some of the greatest rock music around has been produced from them, modern tech gives you more.

You can go lower and higher and louder and you can do it while carting around something that's lighter and smaller. The Pod gives you that option (because it emulates all those heavy tube amp heads and those heavy cabinets for you).
My experience is that using the cabinet simulation of whatever modeler would defeat the purpose of getting a FRFR cab(s) for the sake of having more high and low end, because the cabinet simulation wouldn't let that stuff pass and go to the amp anyway.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
Last edited by Spambot_2 at Mar 25, 2014,
#16
Quote by Spambot_2

I know (well I think I do know) how amps are rated, but when talking about guitar amps the whole rating thing looses lotsa importance because of the difference in amps designs and the fact that nobody gives the complete ratings.


Yeah, exactly. It gets a bit tricky there. You almost never see a guitar amp state the THD levels they use to guesstimate the actual power output. And it varies anyway. My EVJr is rated at 5W with a single EL84. And yet I've got another amp that uses four of the things and it's rated at 50W. I think it's a combination of real circuit jiggering, a bit of "rule of thumb" guessing and some marketing ambivalence <G>.

Quote by Spambot_2
I at least have never seen a guitar amp rated at 50w RMS driven continuously into 4 ohms with less than 0.1% THD from 20Hz to 20kHz, nor anything coming anywhere close to that.


I have, but rarely. I've opened some of the old original SUNN amplifiers and found Dynaco 60 kit components inside. Very high-end hi-fi specs, extremely loud amps, and SUNN eventually replaced these with their own design power amplification, but it was a bit of an eyebrow-raiser. The Carvin TS-100 *used* to offer the THD specs (and it's amazingly clean and completely usable as a hi-fi 50W/50W unit). For a while I used it to feed music content to a pair of old Altec A7 cabinets (want them? available cheap! They take up too much space <G> that I used for bookshelf speakers in a 60 x 100' photo studio. Gorgeous clean sound.

Quote by Spambot_2

My experience is that using the cabinet simulation of whatever modeler would defeat the purpose of getting a FRFR cab(s) for the sake of having more high and low end, because the cabinet simulation wouldn't let that stuff pass and go to the amp anyway.


That's true to an extent, and you'd expect that. But some of these cabinets produce odd harmonics above the actual reproduction range of the speakers themselves, and you can hear them and find them in IRs, hear them in headphones and notice them on recordings, and hear them through the FRFR cabs.

I've also found that electric guitars have a wider range than I would have expected. I have an ancient (1971) solid state guitar amp (about 275W...er...RMS) that feeds a closed-back hugemongous (about 48" x 30" x 14") ported cabinet that houses a pair of 15" Altec 418-8As and a mids/HF horn tweeter. There's clean content there that doesn't get reproduced in a standard Marshall cab (which is a terrible guitar cab design, by the way), both on the top and the bottom.

I also like the FRFR cabinets better in part because I often use Variax guitars, and those include models of miked acoustic guitars, and those have a MUCH wider range than you ordinarily hear out of a guitar cabinet.

There's also this: a standard Marshall cab beams ice-pick treble, with the narrowing beginning to be heard at around 500Hz. It's a miserable live cab, and that's why you see beam blockers, plex screens and all that stuff trying to eliminate some of it. We used to disconnect the right side (both speakers) of a full stack and use only the vertical stack of four 12" speakers remaining. MUCH better dispersion. When they mike a 4x12, it's usually only a single mike on a single speaker (sometimes an additional "room" mike, but rarely, when live) and very close, so the effect of the beaming is eliminated.

The result is that the guitarist, off-axis, hears one thing while his audience hears something completely different. The FRFR cabinets eliminate nearly all of that by using appropriate speaker cone diameters for the particular frequency reproduced.
Last edited by dspellman at Mar 25, 2014,
#17
My brain hurts.

Your cab is 300W and can be run at 4 ohm or 16. Now find a power amp that doesn't go over that rating and run with it. Carvin is a good choice.

Either that or don't use your 1960 at all and grab the best 12" powered wedge you can find on ebay or CL.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#18
I would suggest a Crate Powerblock if you can find one. It's 150w and it has an RCA stereo input on the back that when used, bypasses the preamp. It also has variable impedance and can be run in mono or stereo. I have one and use it with my HD500 and have been happy with the results.
Satan. Grant this man the gift of revenge against his foes at the Food Network.
#19
Quote by dspellman
Yeah, exactly. It gets a bit tricky there. You almost never see a guitar amp state the THD levels they use to guesstimate the actual power output.


I disagree.

Peavey 6505 http://assets.peavey.com/%5Cliterature%5Cmanuals/00575660.pdf

Power Amplifier Section:
Rated Power and Load:
120 W RMS into 16, 8, or 4 ohms
Power @ Clipping:
(Typically @ 5% THD, 1 kHz, 120 V AC line)
130 W RMS into 16, 8, or 4 ohms

Egnater Tweaker 88 http://www.egnateramps.com/manuals/Tweaker88.pdf

SPECIFICATIONS:
OUTPUT POWER: 88 watts RmS @5%THd(cLASS A/B)

Fender Mustang

http://support.fender.com/manuals/guitar_amplifiers/Mustang_I-II_%28V.2%29_Quick_Start_Guide_Rev-B_MULTI.pdf

POWER OUTPUT: 20W RMS into 8Ω @ 5%THD

Crate FW65 http://www.crateamps.com/pdf/manuals/FW65_OM.pdf

Output Power Rating 65W rms @ 5% THD, 8Ω, 120 VAC


Generally the only amps that are exclusively rated at "Peak" are Car stereo amps, many with absolutely BS ratings, and Peak power has a VERY tenuous relationship with RMS.

I can find no guitar amps exclusively rated at Peak? Even the power amps designed for guitar I've found are rated RMS @ xx%Thd? (Carvin etc.)
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#20
Carvin power amps are fantastic, and are very reasonably priced. I own the DCM3800 and I've been using it for 3 years in various configurations: as a bass amp, driving FOH mains, and for driving monitors. It has been rock solid. I would avoid the HD series of their amps, but the DCMs are awesome.
If you want to run in stereo, a power amp is a good choice. I would buy one that can produce at least 150w per side at whatever your speaker load is gonna be (typically between 4 & 16 ohms). If you need more power than that, you probably ought to Mic your cabinet.
#21
Quote by Arby911
I disagree.

Peavey 6505 http://assets.peavey.com/%5Cliterature%5Cmanuals/00575660.pdf

Power Amplifier Section:
Rated Power and Load:
120 W RMS into 16, 8, or 4 ohms
Power @ Clipping:
(Typically @ 5% THD, 1 kHz, 120 V AC line)


There you go, then. Thanks.

Notice that THD number (5% THD).

The Carvin HD1500, for example, has a THD of less than 0.1% at 50% power (20Hz - 20Khz) and less than 0.2% at 90% power.

The guitar amp (and this is pretty typical) is rating its power level with 50 times the total harmonic distortion. And notice that it's only rating that at a single frequency, 1 Khz (not a range).
#22
Quote by Cathbard
My brain hurts.

Your cab is 300W and can be run at 4 ohm or 16. Now find a power amp that doesn't go over that rating and run with it.


You can actually use a power amp that goes well over that rating. You're just going to have to listen for signs that you're exceeding the capabilities of the speaker on a regular basis.
#23
Quote by BBEgo
Carvin power amps are fantastic, and are very reasonably priced. I own the DCM3800 and I've been using it for 3 years in various configurations: as a bass amp, driving FOH mains, and for driving monitors. It has been rock solid. I would avoid the HD series of their amps, but the DCMs are awesome.


I've actually got two Carvin solid state power amps (a DCM1540L and the HD1500), and I've used the 1540 for several years without issues. The HD1500 is relatively new, so I can't report on how well it's going to hold up, but no problems so far. I've also got the Carvin BX1500 (again, 1500W) bass amp, which I *believe* has a power section more similar to the HD1500 than to the DCM1540L. Again, it's relatively new, but has had no problems so far. The worst I've *heard* about Carvin bass amps is that there's occasionally a problem with a ribbon cable losing contact inside the machine, but I've "nailed them down" with a dab of silicone caulk in my amps (I usually try to "vibration proof" my amps when I get a round tuit).

Again, I've got no brand to recommend; I've used Carvin for a long time and they're less expensive than the brands that need to go through an additional layer of profit through a brick and mortar or retailer. Carvins are pretty much factory direct. To be honest, we've seen QSC power amps a lot recently in PA systems, as well as older Crowns and a number of others. I've yet to see one of those go up in smoke, so I'd imagine there are a LOT of choices out there that are highly adequate.
#24
Quote by dspellman
You can actually use a power amp that goes well over that rating. You're just going to have to listen for signs that you're exceeding the capabilities of the speaker on a regular basis.
Yeah you can but it's best to play it safe I've found. When gigging always assume some idiot will do something idiotic when you aren't looking. Murphy works overtime at gigs. And it's not just idiots, faults can happen and it's conceivable, nay probable, that that fault could result in the worst case scenario. ie full volume.
As my Electronics professor told us at the first lecture - "Murphy's law is the only law that always holds true so take it into account any time you design something."
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#25
Quote by dspellman
There you go, then. Thanks.

Notice that THD number (5% THD).

The Carvin HD1500, for example, has a THD of less than 0.1% at 50% power (20Hz - 20Khz) and less than 0.2% at 90% power.

The guitar amp (and this is pretty typical) is rating its power level with 50 times the total harmonic distortion. And notice that it's only rating that at a single frequency, 1 Khz (not a range).


I don't disagree with any of that, but I am at a loss to divine your point?
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#26
Woaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhh




I'm gonna be using my HD500 for the amp sims, not cab sims. I will use the cab sims if I can go direct to PA but some venues don't offer this so I will have to cab share with other bands which is why I was asking if anyone can recommend me a power amp.

A couple of people have suggested Carvin, it looks like these are pretty hard to find in the UK :/

Some gigs I will have to share with another band's cab which is sometimes 8ohm 300w. Would this be a good choice? 300W@4ohms, 180W@8ohms - http://www.gear4music.com/PA-DJ-and-Lighting/Peavey-PV900-Power-Amp/85Y?origin=product-ads&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=&utm_campaign=PLA+Peavey&utm_content=dYwcsNIA|dc_pcrid_39000463879_plid__kword__match__&gclid=CJS2vOyhs70CFdShtAodgikA4g
Last edited by Afroboy267 at Mar 27, 2014,
#28
Quote by PlayforChrist
Is a power amp needed or can I run my POD directly into a PA system?


You can run your POD directly into a PA system.