#1
Say when you hear a song on youtube or something and you wanted to arrange it for guitar. What kind of things should i learn to be able to do that well? for instance how to know what key it's in and things like that.

ty
#2
Quote by redd9
Say when you hear a song on youtube or something and you wanted to arrange it for guitar. What kind of things should i learn to be able to do that well? for instance how to know what key it's in and things like that.

ty


I think knowing things like theory, allows you to help narrow down possible chords, if you determine the key. A lot of songs follow very similar tendencies, and after a while you start to hear those things, like when a chord changes to a IV or V (if you don't know what those are, the roman numerals mean they are the 4th and 5th chords in a key - very common chord moves).

I think drawing on prior knowledge, like songs you've learned, if you have learned a lot of them, is good for helping the ear recognize a chord later. For instance, I can hear an open D strummed and recognize it as such immediately.

Having a familiarity with scales also helps to narrow down must of the notes in a pitch collection, that are in a given melody.

If I were arranging, then key and knowledge of the likely underlying chords in a melody would be very useful.

Best,

Sean
#3
Quote by redd9
Say when you hear a song on youtube or something and you wanted to arrange it for guitar. What kind of things should i learn to be able to do that well? for instance how to know what key it's in and things like that.

ty



Once you've been actively listening to music for a long time you begin to get an ear for the tonal center (key) of a song.

First figure out the key of the song whether it is minor or major.

Once you've figured out the key of the song listen to the chord progression. Where does the bass move and how does it relate to the harmony underneath?

You should have an understanding of the instrument you are trying to arrange it for. If the majority of the notes are being played at a fast single note tremolo for example you wouldn't want to give that note to the piano player.

Take the range of what's being played into account. Are the notes mostly in a higher register or are they in a lower register? Having to many of one can make the instruments sound like they are fighting for to much attention.

Learn about diatonic harmony as well as key signatures. Use common sense with your instrument choices and you should be good to go.