#1
Okay so it might be a little bit of a mess but I don't really know where to start. I don't have much musical knowledge on singing other than tenor is high and baritone is lower so lol you might need to keep it simple.
1. I have no idea what my vocal range is so how could I figure that out?
2. My voice sounds kind of boring and monotone but I wouldn't really say it sounds bad. How would I know if my voice is monotone and how can I improve it?
3. I also love metalcore music so I also have an interest in scream singing, I don't really want to do both but I would like to try this out but I don't want to mess up my vocal cords but I do know screaming eventually does wear out your voice even when correctly doing it. My favorite "screamers" are Jared Warth from blessthefall and Michael Bohn from Issues and my favorite clean singers are Garret Rapp from The Color Morale and David Schmitt from Breathe Carolina if that helps in any way. How could I practice this correctly?
4. I play guitar but when I play a song, sometimes it does not sound right when I sing along with my playing cuz the song is either higher then my voice or lower (sorry if that is hard to understand, I don't know really how to explain it.) But if you know what I'm talking about then do I try to adjust my voice to song or can I just not sing it?

David Schmitt (Clean)- 0:43
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vdNk3Rcb80E

Garret Rapp (Clean)- 1:12
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSe_Jz0KhbY

Michael Bohn (Unclean)- 0:30
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9dEPE5GiGs

Jared Warth (Unclean) 1:20-
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2UJH9dCtp7w
"One good thing about music, when it hits you, you feel no pain."- Bob Marley
Last edited by JacobyDB at Mar 25, 2014,
#2
1. You don't really care. It doesn't change anything, you just have to work with what you get. If it is just to know, you can check the highest and the lowest note you can achieve (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voice_types).
2. That depends on what you want to do. But that is the "non-trained" voice syndrome : you sound monotome and probably shitty because you have no clue about the wonderful instrument which is the voice (and I don't blame you, if nobody tells you, you'll never know). Best way to get the basics if to take a few lesson, to be able to "discover" what you can do, know what goal is realistic, what you'll never be able to do, etc...
3. Meh. A lot of guys try to scream like metalcore bands. I would recommend it without taking advices from somebody who knows how to sing like this, and not scream. Because metalcore scream is not really screaming : if you scream, you hurt your voice. So it's really singing first, which lead to what I've said before, vocal lesson.
4. You won't be able to sing every song you like, that's a fact : the vocalists you listen to have probably various ranges. You can use some tricks, like a capo or changing the tuning of your guitar, but it's never a viable solution if the range difference is to big.
Last edited by Shavyi at Mar 8, 2015,
#3
- I don't even recommend testing your vocal range until you start to train your vocals. You probably have zero idea at this point how to properly access your higher (and lower) end notes. You first have to learn how to properly do this. Get a vocal coach. This is one of the only instruments where you can do serious harm when doing something wrong. And the longer you do something wrong, the harder to train yourself out of it it is.

- You haven't figured out how to control your voice properly and add texture, emotion and certain effects.

- From my experience, belting for long periods of time also leads to vocal fatigue even when done properly. Screaming metalcore is almost all belted notes. Learning to scream won't be horrible for you but for me, I'd keep the amount of screaming I do to a lower amount. At least at the start. Learn to sing before screaming because it requires the same techniques.

- You're probably trying to emulate their songs entirely. Including keeping the same key. Like the poster above said. You might not be physically able to access the notes you want to hit. Also, your pitch detection may be poor at this point.

All of this can be corrected or explored with training.
#4
Thank you for the replies, lol that helped alot
"One good thing about music, when it hits you, you feel no pain."- Bob Marley
#5
the singer of my band SUCKED when we first started. he has improved a million % after taking a few lessons, watching people and analyzing their technique. What I have heard him say helps is to learn good breathing control, push with your diaphragm, and smile when you sing (I'm not kidding.) I guess what the smiling thing does is it opens everything up more and helps project your voice. Another thing, try not to scream a lot until you know damn well that your doing it right and are not hurting yourself. When our vocalist (lead guitarist as well) started screaming, it sounded painful, he said it hurt, and he couldn't talk right after doing it for a lengthened period of time. Now he has learned, can do it for hours on end and talk perfectly normal after it all. This is coming from a band member witnessing this, so this isn't a first hand account so do your research on my pointers and find the techniques for yourself heres a video of us playing live. He screams and clean sings. maybe you can get an idea of what his technique is. Send me a message if you'd like me to personally ask him for you. Hope this helps.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaq1nx8xOY0
-DISRUPTION