#1
So I've been playing guitar for a good minute. I've had about 8 different guitars ranging from Gibson to ESP. I've got an Ibanez RG1420 10th Anniversary model and I have the most difficult time getting that guitar tuned! If I change from say Drop C and want to play Drop B, it takes me a good 10min to get the strings in tune. One by one, I'll get each string in tune, then I go back to double check my tunes and each string will be a whole step off! I have to repeat this process at least 5 times! But once it gets in tune, it stays in tune! I've tried different gauge strings, using the nut locks, not using the nut locks and every time, it's a huge pain in the ass. Changing strings completely, that can take me a half hour to get those damn things in tune!! Please, any advice will be much appreciated. I'm desperate!
#2
Quote by sdf5150
So I've been playing guitar for a good minute. I've had about 8 different guitars ranging from Gibson to ESP. I've got an Ibanez RG1420 10th Anniversary model and I have the most difficult time getting that guitar tuned! If I change from say Drop C and want to play Drop B, it takes me a good 10min to get the strings in tune. One by one, I'll get each string in tune, then I go back to double check my tunes and each string will be a whole step off! I have to repeat this process at least 5 times! But once it gets in tune, it stays in tune! I've tried different gauge strings, using the nut locks, not using the nut locks and every time, it's a huge pain in the ass. Changing strings completely, that can take me a half hour to get those damn things in tune!! Please, any advice will be much appreciated. I'm desperate!
I my guitar all ways gets out of tune!!!!!
#4
Sounds like you're not properly stretching the strings. So once you get it tuned, they release just a little bit. I usually stretch them pretty good before I even think about locking them down. Don't stretch too hard. You know they're properly stretched when they don't change much after trying to stretch again.
#5
Quote by KingChris90
Is the bridge a locking trem or a floating perhaps?


It is, like most of Ibanez's line.

TS I would recommend, personally, that if you want to change tunings often you use a different guitar for it: double locking trems are at their best when you pick a tuning and stick to it.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#6
Yeah if its a floating bridge then you have the same problem that every other guitar with a floating bridge will have. A change in tuning like that requires the guitar to be re-set up. As was said, best to pick a tuning and stick with it. That's why I ditched all my floating bridge guitars long ago.
'93 Gibson LP Studio (498T/490R)-Ebony
'14 Gibson LP Standard (JB/Jazz)-Ocean Water Perimeter
Epi MKH LP Custom-7 (SD Custom Shop JB-7)-Ebony
+More

Maxon od808|Boss NS-2|Boss CE-5|
Line6 G55|Korg Pitchblack Pro

JVM 210h|1960a(V30/G12t-75)
#7
Changing tuning with a locking bridge or floating vibrato, and even most non-floating vibratos, requires adjustment of the spring tension at the back of the guitar. You also usually have to adjust the bridge posts slightly, which requires removing the bridge. If your guitar has a locking nut then you should always be using it.

So to put it simply, if you want to use different tunings with vibrato bridges, what you need to do is get a second guitar for the second tuning. Either that or be prepared to spend half an hour or more changing tuning each time.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#8
The only way you will be able to change tuning's easily with it is to block the trem for dive only. Then set it up for the highest tuning you will be using. You don't want to set it up for a lower tuning first then have the bridge raise up when you switch to a higher one.

You always want to have the nut locked when playing, they are not designed to be used unlocked, way to much friction going on and the wound strings can bind up in it. Having a Floyd style bridge setup for dive only or having a top mounted decked one will get rid of almost every headache people can complain about. You just sacrifice pull ups and tricks like flutters, but changing tuning's and strings is a breeze (compared to floating).

So you have to chose to either leave your bridge floating and setup with one tuning, or block for dive only and quick re-tuning and string changes. If you can't live with it being blocked for dive only then you need to pick you favorite tuning for that guitar and set it up for that. Then use a fixed bridge of some sort guitar to use for multiple tuning's.
#9
I have 4 other guitars, so sounds like best bet is to just stick with one tune. I wasn't aware actually that floating bridges or other types of vibrato bridges had this much problem. But considering the fact that I don't hardly ever use the whammy bar or do any dives, I will probably stick with fixed bridges.

Thanks guys for the advice....I may just put it up for sale if anybody would be interested.
#10
A floating trem is not good for changing tunings. It's that simple. Put it in one tuning and keep it there. Or block your trem.