#1
I want lessons that will help me learn the chromatic scale, and music theory! I can play songs when the music has the chords written with it, but when the music is only notes in the staff I'm clueless .
#2
I'm willing to bet you already know the chromatic scale. It's just all 12 notes in music. It isn't really in a key, because it's chromatic.

As for music theory, start here: musictheory.net
#3
As obvious as it sounds, you can't really go wrong with Musictheory.net - great website with excellent information and useful exercises.

When learning music theory, try and apply or implement it into your songwriting (not a hard and fast rule and not always required to write a great song), which should help you understand the keys, chords, scales, cadences etc. and all the relationships associated.

Music theory can help you add great tricks into your songs like using leading tones in minor keys in the V chord, secondary dominants and loads of other things to make your compositions sound interesting.

Feel free to message me if you need help with any of the theory stuff

Have fun!
Last edited by NikFire89 at Mar 27, 2014,
#4
google is your friend...

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You may have to try a few to find one that you "get". Theory can be basic to extremely dense. I'm still working on it myself.

You have 'scales' - chromatic is all the notes but that means nothing.
There are major and minor, blues, pentatonic.
There are modes. Simpler than it sounds..not sure what they're good for.

What you need to know, I think, is what scale is the song in and what notes are in that scale.
Then what is a chord - power chord is 1-3 or 1-3-8. (first note, third note, root one octave higher).
Minor flats two notes, dim and aug are again flat and 'sharp' certain notes in a scale.

If you look at A and Am you'll see the diff is the third is flatted.

But knowing theory is just part one - like everything in music you have to internalize it and be able to 'do it' just as easily as I'm typing this sentence. I can type, spell, see/read, think and have no pauses to try and remember what is next.

And that takes time and practice.
#5
Lots of good information exists right here on UG and on the net at large, but if you're serious about music, find a guitar teacher (or a modern piano teacher for that matter) that specializes in music theory and guitar. Or even see if there's a music theory class available at a local community college. You may be surprised how little it might cost to get guidance in this department, how quickly you are able to learn the fundamentals and how much pain and frustration you save yourself from trying to put it all together in a non cohesive, random way from bits of info on the internet. Talk to local music stores and get names, make a few calls.

Good luck
#6
Quote by swgmstr417
I want lessons that will help me learn the chromatic scale, and music theory! I can play songs when the music has the chords written with it, but when the music is only notes in the staff I'm clueless .


Google Mike Dodge - as for free, he has free lessons on his site.

Good luck!

Best,

Sean
#7
Quote by swgmstr417
I want lessons that will help me learn the chromatic scale, and music theory! I can play songs when the music has the chords written with it, but when the music is only notes in the staff I'm clueless .


Chromatic scale: A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G# and back to A again and it starts all over.
#8
Guitar has 4-5 octaves from the low register to the high register in pitch. On a staff, there is a one to one relationship with notes and they are hierarchically arranged from low to high register in pitch.

Octave can be equally divided into 12 tones/notes (chromatic scale).

On each string, when you go left or right, you go up or down a tone, like a piano. So you could visualize the guitar with 6 strings as 6 mini overlapping pianos - each string is tuned differently to make chords easy to play...but, as a result, this makes it difficult - you have to think vertical and horizontal when playing and you can play the same note more than once in many instances on different frets/strings.

Musictheory.net and Teoria are great. I definitely think a college course is helpful.