#1
As a beginner I have found I prefer to learn songs which don't use chords, they just use fingers been placed on certain parts of the fretboard. An example of this is Nirvana Come as you are. I just find it easier, especially as I'm a total beginner.
#2
Don't skip out just because it's hard. Chords form the basis of so many things.

Also: there is no question here. This is just a collection of statements.
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Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


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#3
Learn to love chords like your ugly step child!
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#4
Quote by Fallenoath
Learn to love chords like your ugly step child!


Or that sexy goth chick everyone in school thinks is weird and crazy. She's amazing really, they just don't know it yet.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#5
Haha that's one way of looking at it. I am trying to learn chords but, as a beginner I prefer learning the chord free licks just so I can actually play something and have something to show for the endless hours I practice.
#6
As much as anything else... you won't find much in the way of simple things that don't have chords. Suck it up dude, you need to learn sooner or later so it might as well be sooner.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#7
I used to have the same question. It's important to understand what chords are, especially if you're playing other people's music, but the truth is, you can improvise on pentatonic patterns for hours, if you know how to connect them. One book really does an incredible job of teaching exactly this - www.chordlessguitar.com. It's kinda hyped in the advertising, but I got it and it really is awesome.
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#8
Quote by Ruark
I used to have the same question. It's important to understand what chords are, especially if you're playing other people's music, but the truth is, you can improvise on pentatonic patterns for hours, if you know how to connect them. One book really does an incredible job of teaching exactly this - www.chordlessguitar.com. It's kinda hyped in the advertising, but I got it and it really is awesome.


Thanks that looks like it could be just what I need.
#9
I'm just going to reiterate how much of a terrible idea it is for you to skimp on learning chords and chord-based songs. They form the foundation of so much and the more time you put it off for the worse it's going to get.

I'm done though; you know what you want, even if it's not what you need.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#10
I've been playing for 22 years, but I was always into metal primarily, and I learned to play lead decently, and play rhythm decently with a pedal note and power chords. But there were only really a few stretches where I pushed myself to get better with my chords. I mean I could do a bunch of open chords, and the common barre chord shapes like major, minor, 7th chords, etc, but I never really pushed myself to go much beyond that. Well, then my tastes broadened (though I still love metal), and there was all this music I wanted to play, but I was having a hard time with the chords. I realized there was a huge chunk of my foundation missing, and now I am practicing my chords like crazy (over an hour a day dedicated just to chords) trying to catch up. A lot of this stuff would be effortless by now if I had given them the time they deserved earlier on. For me, this is spilled milk, so there isn't much point bemoaning it; I just have to work hard at getting better, just like I do with other areas of my playing.

For you, just starting out, you have the opportunity to lay this foundation right. Don't be like me and give too little attention to such an important part of being a musician, only to realize decades later that you would do things differently given a do-over. Yes, chords are hard. They take a lot of co-ordination, and you have to work really hard at them. But by starting with the easiest chord changes first you can build it up gradually, and it only takes a handful of chords to play quite a few songs.

I hope what I've said will make you at least think about this some more.
#11
Guys it seems like I have givne you the wrong idea. I am still practising chords, I am not just leaving them out of my learning. It would be pointless not to learn them especially as most of the music I like and want to learn to play uses them. I just want to learn chord free licks as well. That way it seems like Im getting somewhere and it keeps me motivated. I struggle with chords at the moment and it is going to take me a long time to even get anywhere near being able to play a few properly. I am still practising though. It just gets disheartening when you put a lot of time and effort in and don't get results.