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#1
After learning the modes in G Major, it came to me. Each mode has its own flavor/tonality but what if one were to mix those flavors. Do you know anyways to combine the flavors of B Phrygian and A Dorian through means like special chord progressions, chords, or scales? I'd like it to still fit with G Major. Any advice (I'm both curious and wanting to spice up my playing). Help would be appreciated.

Before you ask, I usually search the internet for about an hour and if I can't find any answers, I ask here. I also trying to learn modal theory (like what chords give certain flavors of a mode like Phrygian, Dorian, Lydian, ect).
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#2
You can't really combine flavors of B phrygian and A dorian. I mean, they both use the same notes. What makes them sound different is the tonic. Play both of them over the same chord and they will sound the same because they are the same notes. Your background gives your notes their function. If you play both B phrygian and A dorian over a G major chord, it will actually sound like the G major scale all the time.

Don't think different modes as G major starting with different notes. Think them like this:

Dorian = minor with a major 6th (1, 2, b3, 4, 5, 6, b7)
Phrygian = minor with a minor 2nd (1, b2, b3, 4, 5, b6, b7)
Lydian = major with an augmented 4th (1, 2, 3, #4, 5, 6, 7)
Mixolydian = major with a minor 7th (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, b7)

(ionian = major, aeolian = minor, locrian = pretty much useless)

This will help you to hear the differences between the modes. To learn the differences, first play G major then G dorian, G phrygian, lydian, mixo and minor over a sustained G note. That way you'll hear the differences. Compare G minor to G dorian and G phrygian, and G major to G lydian and G mixolydian.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Mar 28, 2014,
#3
Then what about B Phrygian and B Dorian? I want to mix the flavors.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#4
Actually there's something really interesting about that - if you mix the b2 of Phrygian and the natural 6 of Dorian, you get a Dorian b2, which is a melodic minor mode. That works with any modes that are 2 intervals (for lack of a better word) apart - Mixolydian and Lydian gives you Lydian dominant, which is another melodic minor mode. Pretty interesting stuff.
#5
Quote by RonaldPoe
After learning the modes in G Major, it came to me. Each mode has its own flavor/tonality but what if one were to mix those flavors. Do you know anyways to combine the flavors of B Phrygian and A Dorian through means like special chord progressions, chords, or scales? I'd like it to still fit with G Major. Any advice (I'm both curious and wanting to spice up my playing). Help would be appreciated.

Before you ask, I usually search the internet for about an hour and if I can't find any answers, I ask here. I also trying to learn modal theory (like what chords give certain flavors of a mode like Phrygian, Dorian, Lydian, ect).



Honestly, none of what you are asking is possible.

For one, you don't appear to understand what modes are. I'd stop right there. And the next thing I'd suggest is take a personal inventory of what your theory skill sets are. If you don't know music theory, stop, and do so. If you cant recognize when a secondary dominant is in use, if you can't discuss cadences with any accuracy, if youre not as adept with diatonic harmony and interval knowledge as you are with saying your ABC's, then you do not have the skill set to understand modes.

There's no leapfrogging into modes, and you cant just choose calculus without basic addition. It doesn't happen. I hope this direct post allows you to save years of time and frustration running in circles.

That said, the only thing you can reliably do to combine B Dorian and Phrygian is to play both, and mix and match over a B drone...no changing. A B Bass note that never changes.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Mar 28, 2014,
#6
Quote by Sean0913
That said, the only thing you can reliably do to combine B Dorian and Phrygian is to play both, and mix and match over a B drone...no changing. A B Bass note that never changes.


this is basically your answer...start with that and see how cleverly you can mask the inherent conflict between dorian and phrygian
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Like melodic, black, death, symphonic, and/or avant-garde metal? Want to collaborate? Message me!
#7
Quote by RonaldPoe
Then what about B Phrygian and B Dorian? I want to mix the flavors.


So what you're talking about here is:

B C C# D E F# G G# A.

This is going to sound like ... B minor with accidentals. Which is, of course, what it is.

Here's my question to you:

If you were playing in B minor, and somebody said, "sharpen your sixths!" would you be able to do that? Do you know where your sixths are, when you're playing?

If you were listening to me playing in B minor, and I threw in a G#, would you instantly know what I did? Would you recognize it not only as an outside note, but know WHICH outside note it was?

If the answer to those questions is not yes, then what you're trying to do is a waste of time and quite possibly counterproductive.
#8
I'm pretty sure "sharpen your sixths" means raise the sixth (preferably by a half-step). I'd also either notice the outside note or simply ignore it (outside notes make things sound more interesting and are quite stylish) and keep playing. I admit I'm not too great at applying the theory I know.

I was wondering because it'd be cool to try new tonalities and use them in playing/composition. Also what would B Lydian and B Phrygian be combined? What about C minor/Aeolian and C Major/Ionian (you know like the outro/solo from Radiohead's "Paranoid Android"). I admit learning the G Major modes because I love the E-Minor scale (I know I should learn some more basic scales like B Minor, C Minor, and most major scales that aren't G Major).

To vIsIbleNoIsE: Where can I sign up for your Extreme Metal project? It would be really fun to learn and work on Extreme Metal and collaborate with someone. I mostly write electronic music but expanding one's horizon is good.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#9
Mini rant:

I get when you say "sharpen" your 6th, that if you know your theory, you acknowledge that in a Natural minor, which is what's being assumed to be modified into Dorian, that the "sixth" in question is a FLAT 6, so when you say "sharpen" I always change that to "Raise", because a Raised b6 is a natural 6, and a "sharp 6" sounds like "Take the 6th and sharp it" (#6), which is a totally different thing.

End mini rant.

Best,

Sean
#10
Quote by RonaldPoe
What about C minor/Aeolian and C Major/Ionian (you know like the outro/solo from Radiohead's "Paranoid Android"). I admit learning the G Major modes because I love the E-Minor scale (I know I should learn some more basic scales like B Minor, C Minor, and most major scales that aren't G Major).


Read your thread on Paranoid Android again. The outro was found to be in C major. Not C minor, aoelian or ionian, just C major. No mixture of tonality, just a good use of accidentals and non-diatonic chords.

And yes you should learn more basics before continuing down this path.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#11
If you want to mix two scales, you need to learn the sound. You can't just randomly mix them. Use your ears. Mixing minor and major is really common in blues. But again, it's not randomly mixing major and minor. Every note has a purpose. So learn to use your ears. Let your ears guide your playing.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#12
The Beatles - Norwegian Wood shifts back and forth between D Mixolydian and D Dorian.

A lot of blues songs blends major and minor tonalities.
False Relation is the use of chromatically "contradictory" notes in close proximity to each other. This is what the blues players did when they would use the major and minor thirds in the same chord. It was also prominent in Tudor music

Mode mixture is a way of using a chord from the parallel major or minor key. In a major key for example using the minor iv chord such as I IV iv I.

As MagaraMarine notes you can't blend A Phrygian with B Dorian, at least not without some very skilfull modulation. But if it's still going to "fit" with G major then it's more than likely all just G major.
Si
#13
Quote by RonaldPoe
I'm pretty sure "sharpen your sixths" means raise the sixth (preferably by a half-step). I'd also either notice the outside note or simply ignore it (outside notes make things sound more interesting and are quite stylish) and keep playing. I admit I'm not too great at applying the theory I know.


Then why are you trying to learn more theory?

This is important: you do not KNOW a piece of theory until you can HEAR IT IN PRACTICE. Coming up with labels for stuff that you can't identify by listening to in a practical context is just a bunch of academic masturbation. It's pointless. Heck, it's often worse than pointless: it's counterproductive.


I was wondering because it'd be cool to try new tonalities and use them in playing/composition.


Master the basics, first. The fact that we call it "basics" makes it sound limiting, but it's the foundation everything else is built on. Playing and composing interesting music is not about filling your brain with academic concepts - it's about being able to hear, and being able to apply what you know.

Also what would B Lydian and B Phrygian be combined?


The chromatic scale. (1 b2 2 b3 3 4 b5 5 b6 b7 7).

Does having that name help you make music in any way, shape, or form? The fact that you're asking indicates a pretty low level of general knowledge. This is a rabbit hole that isn't going to help you make better music.
#14
Quote by HotspurJr
Then why are you trying to learn more theory?

This is important: you do not KNOW a piece of theory until you can HEAR IT IN PRACTICE. Coming up with labels for stuff that you can't identify by listening to in a practical context is just a bunch of academic masturbation. It's pointless. Heck, it's often worse than pointless: it's counterproductive.


Master the basics, first. The fact that we call it "basics" makes it sound limiting, but it's the foundation everything else is built on. Playing and composing interesting music is not about filling your brain with academic concepts - it's about being able to hear, and being able to apply what you know.


The chromatic scale. (1 b2 2 b3 3 4 b5 5 b6 b7 7).

Does having that name help you make music in any way, shape, or form? The fact that you're asking indicates a pretty low level of general knowledge. This is a rabbit hole that isn't going to help you make better music.


Dude, you need to seriously stop it. You're making sense. People here don't listen to you when you make sense.

Ain't nobody got time for wisdom and logic here. It's all about downing massive quantities of misinformation, while skillfully culling away all that unnecessary truth and usefulness.

No one's got time to stop and acknowledge things that make complete and total sense. It's all rush ahead, and talk and talk and when something isn't what you want to hear, push it aside and keep droning the same questions like you must surely be wrong (even though they are the ones with the question in the first place).

Haven't you been reading ANY of these threads? Come on man...stop being so....correct.

Sigh



Sean
#15
It's okay, I gave up on this a few days ago. Instead I'll be writing a Metal version of a song from Candle Cove (the Creepypasta about the puppet pirate show from the 70s). I'm going a dark, Pirate, Circus feel. Do you know anywhere I could look for that will help me with songwriting and conveying moods?

I understand Sean and am stopping my oddball threads. As you know my problems more about not knowing how to apply theory than lack of theory. Have a nice day.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
Last edited by RonaldPoe at Apr 1, 2014,
#16
The -2 in the Phrygian is just the -3 in the Dorian.
The root of the Phrygian acts like a 9th, which is a perfect 5th from the dorian's dominant.
You can use it like a leading tone into the -2.

It depends on the backing track. Most of the time it's not really the notes.
It's the beat that you play it in. You can hit a wrong (out) note on the right beat, itll still sound good.
#17
Title made me lol.

Don't look at scales with accidentals as modes. Look at them as alterred scales. Modes nowadays are looked at as if they were some holy grail to make you play like god. For instance the sound referred to as lydian would make you sound a bit, if used right, like Steve Vai.

The problem is that the sound referred to as lydian isn't theoretically correctly named. It is just an alterred scale.

Lydian would be a major scale with a raised 4th. Not a flat 5 and if you can't explain why it shouldn't be a flat 5 you shouldn't even have tried to understand the modes.
#18
Quote by liampje
Title made me lol.

Don't look at scales with accidentals as modes. Look at them as alterred scales. Modes nowadays are looked at as if they were some holy grail to make you play like god. For instance the sound referred to as lydian would make you sound a bit, if used right, like Steve Vai.

The problem is that the sound referred to as lydian isn't theoretically correctly named. It is just an alterred scale.

Lydian would be a major scale with a raised 4th. Not a flat 5 and if you can't explain why it shouldn't be a flat 5 you shouldn't even have tried to understand the modes.

Lydian isn't going to make you sound like Steve Vai. To sound like Steve Vai you need to play like Steve Vai. Yes, Steve Vai does use the lydian scale in some of his solos but so does many other guitarists. The chords you are playing over determine which scale you "should" use. If the chords are A and B/A, it has that lydian feel to it and A lydian will fit the chords perfectly. This doesn't make you sound like Steve Vai. Style is different than scales. Steve Vai always sounds like Steve Vai, no matter what scale he uses. You always sound like yourself, no matter what you play.

And who was talking about flat 5 in lydian? Everybody knows that lydian scale has an augmented fourth. And why is that? Because lydian scale is a seven note scale and it has to have seven different notes. It can't have two different fifths and no fourth in it. That's why it's an augmented fourth, not a diminished fifth.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Apr 6, 2014,
#21
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Lydian isn't going to make you sound like Steve Vai.


Well, not without a fan, at least.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
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#22
Joe Satriani says Mix (no pun intended.... maybe?)

I don't think that was written by Satriani. Even if it were I still wouldn't give much weight to it. This is the man who made up "pitch axis theory". He can make up other stuff too.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#24


^^ Yeah it sounds a bit like the intro to one of the satriani tab books i have (though I suspect the one quoted is from a guitar mag, that's what it looks like, anyway).
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#25
Quote by tonibet72
Joe Satriani says Mix (no pun intended.... maybe?)

Yeah, he says what he says. I wouldn't describe that scale as a mix of dorian and mixolydian (they are just one note different from each other that is the third). I would say it's just using both the minor and major third and also the minor seventh. Not all scales need to have a name. And not all notes need to be part of a scale. That's why there are accidentals. Many songs mainly use the major scale (or some other scale) and also some accidentals. There's no point in building a scale that includes all those accidentals and giving it a new name. That's just not understanding the music. Most of the time accidentals are chord tones from non-diatonic chords or chromatic passing notes. They don't need to belong to any scale.

For example I remember somebody posting a question about an instrumental piece and somebody said it was using the blues scale which it wasn't. There was a secondary dominant chord and the augmented fourth was a chord tone of that chord. You can't just take all notes a song uses and build a scale with them. There's no use for that because certain notes are only used at certain parts. They are a part of a bigger picture. And naming scales has nothing to do with understanding the music.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#26
if anything that mixodorian is almost like that "extended" blues scale which i discovered fairly recently and mention all the time to try to appear smarter

though i would say that I'm not sure i'd describe surfing with the alien as really sounding like that scale, either, to my ears at least. that scale (to my ears, and the way I use it and normally see it used) just sounds kind of (major) bluesy or "classic rock" ish, and I'm not sure I'd describe surfing with the alien as sounding like that- it has a weirder sound (to my ears) which normally (to me) suggests a mode (scale, not the overall tonality) is being used, or at least something outside the usual major/minor thing (which to my ears sound "normal"). It hones in on those "weirder" outside notes whereas the "extended blues" scale tends to use them more almost as passing tones.

right, now for the MT regulars to rip that BS post to shreds

But yeah apart from that, I agree with what you guys are saying.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Apr 6, 2014,
#27
The accidentals Surfing with the Alien uses are just chord tones. As I said before, I wouldn't build a scale from all notes used in the song. That just doesn't tell anything about what's happening musically. The b3 is used over the IV chord which makes it a dominant 7th chord. IVdom7 sounds pretty bluesy. It also uses the b7 accidental over the I chord - again pretty bluesy. Both chords in the main riff are dom7 chords and Satriani is just emphasizing chord tones. But yeah, I think it's just pointless to start building random scales. The song is not modal.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Apr 6, 2014,
#28
and there we go, as i predicted

deferred.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#29
My whole idea with this topic was experimentation and finding an odd tonality (like Steve Vai's Xavian Scale). Right now I'm trying to write a Metal song with a gothic pirate circus feel (that sounds weird but it fits my vision).

I don't know how this topic got to be about "Surfing With The Alien" (Joe Satriani) but I'm just trying to be unique. Oh well ...
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#30
Quote by RonaldPoe
My whole idea with this topic was experimentation and finding an odd tonality (like Steve Vai's Xavian Scale). Right now I'm trying to write a Metal song with a gothic pirate circus feel (that sounds weird but it fits my vision).

I don't know how this topic got to be about "Surfing With The Alien" (Joe Satriani) but I'm just trying to be unique. Oh well ...

There's 12 notes, 6 strings, and a nearly infinite amount of chord/note/etc. combinations possible. The uniqueness is up to you, no need to come up with silly scales to be unique. Just play, man!
#31
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
There's 12 notes, 6 strings, and a nearly infinite amount of chord/note/etc. combinations possible. The uniqueness is up to you, no need to come up with silly scales to be unique. Just play, man!

Yeah, and use your ears! You don't need to (and you shouldn't) write songs to fit a scale. Many songs use lots of notes outside of the scale. I wouldn't really think about scales when writing music. As I said, the scale you use tells very little about the music. Think musically, not too technically.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#32
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Yeah, and use your ears! You don't need to (and you shouldn't) write songs to fit a scale. Many songs use lots of notes outside of the scale. I wouldn't really think about scales when writing music. As I said, the scale you use tells very little about the music. Think musically, not too technically.

Mhmmm!
#33
I find it good to use neighboring tones (quickly playing a note a half-step up/down then moving it back so you can use accidentals and stay in key). Honestly I usually do what fits my vision for the song (for example using "atonality" for a tribute to DBZ's Broly). Like I said I'm writing music currently and going for my own visions.

I'm also curious if there's a way to create unique tonalities like Steve Vai's Xavian scale? Like what chord progression would work for the B Dorian b2/Javanese Scale (that's a mixture of B Dorian and B Phrygian or a mode of Melodic Minor). I'm just a little experimental and stuff.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#34
Quote by RonaldPoe
I find it good to use neighboring tones (quickly playing a note a half-step up/down then moving it back so you can use accidentals and stay in key). Honestly I usually do what fits my vision for the song (for example using "atonality" for a tribute to DBZ's Broly). Like I said I'm writing music currently and going for my own visions.

I'm also curious if there's a way to create unique tonalities like Steve Vai's Xavian scale? Like what chord progression would work for the B Dorian b2/Javanese Scale (that's a mixture of B Dorian and B Phrygian or a mode of Melodic Minor). I'm just a little experimental and stuff.

Write the notes in the scale and figure out which chords you can build with the notes of the scale if you really want to do it. But for strange scales like that there are just a couple of chords that really work.

B dorian b2: B C D E F# G# A

R  3  5  7
B  D  F# A  - Bm7
C  E  G# B  - Cmaj7+5
D  F# A  C  - D7
E  G# B  D  - E7
F# A  C  E  - F#m7b5
G# B  D  F# - G#m7b5
A  C  E  G# - Amaj7


Remember that by using these chords it may or may not sound like that scale (and most likely it won't). If you add too many chords, it may resolve to some other note than B and then it doesn't sound like that scale. So maybe play it over a one or two chord vamp. Exotic scales don't usually work over more complex chord progressions that well. But whatever, just experiment. But really, learn how to construct chords from a scale and you don't need to ask these questions again.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#35
^^
Ronald, the Xavian scale is totally synthetic, it doesn't even use the same intervals as the chromatic scale. It's unique because it's a completely different system of dividing the octave.

You'll never achieve something that "unique" on a guitar if you're still using the same 12 notes.


Quote by AlanHB
I don't think that was written by Satriani. Even if it were I still wouldn't give much weight to it. This is the man who made up "pitch axis theory". He can make up other stuff too.

Nailed on that was written by Wolf Marshall
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#36
Sorry to revive this topic but I realized you can get a B Javanese (Dorian b2) flavor by switching between B5 and Caug5 (C, G# played together). Good chords to add would be E major, A minor, and A5.

Does anyone know any other odd modal combinations and ways to harmonize them? I know I'm a little odd.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#37
^^^ If you had a progression that contained B5, a C - G# dyad, A5, Am and E chords I would assume that this resolves to A minor. If this is the case it wouldn't sound like B javanese, it would sound like A minor.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#38
I don't get how my chord progression is in A minor. It has all but one of the notes of B Javanese/Dorian b2 (B, C, D, E, F#, G#, A, B). A Minor is derived from C Major which doesn't have any sharps (meaning F# and G#) or flats. I made sure to include only notes inside B Javanese/Dorian b2. I thought that would give the progression the scale's tonality. Could someone explain? ). I also admit that I suck at applying theory to my playing (that's part of the reason I start these topics). Hope everyone has a nice day.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#39
Quote by RonaldPoe
I don't get how my chord progression is in A minor. It has all but one of the notes of B Javanese/Dorian b2 (B, C, D, E, F#, G#, A, B). A Minor is derived from C Major which doesn't have any sharps (meaning F# and G#) or flats. I made sure to include only notes inside B Javanese/Dorian b2. I thought that would give the progression the scale's tonality. Could someone explain? ). I also admit that I suck at applying theory to my playing (that's part of the reason I start these topics). Hope everyone has a nice day.

It doesn't actually matter what notes the progression contains. All that matters is what chord it resolves to. I can play anything I want over (whether it sounds good or not) a basic i-iv-v progression in Aminor, but everything will always resolve to Aminor (because that's the tonic). A rather simplistic example, but the point is that...the chord that is the tonic is going to determine the key.

I suggest looking into the concept of diatonic chords/notes.
#40
Quote by RonaldPoe
I don't get how my chord progression is in A minor. It has all but one of the notes of B Javanese/Dorian b2 (B, C, D, E, F#, G#, A, B). A Minor is derived from C Major which doesn't have any sharps (meaning F# and G#) or flats. I made sure to include only notes inside B Javanese/Dorian b2. I thought that would give the progression the scale's tonality. Could someone explain? ). I also admit that I suck at applying theory to my playing (that's part of the reason I start these topics). Hope everyone has a nice day.



Why do you not get how your chord progression is in A Minor?

How are you going to make that sound resolved to B? Please post your song.

1 + 2 equals 3.

How would you describe to a 5 year old how the numbers 1+2 dont equal 12? After all 12 is a 12, and the math problem has a 1 and 2 in it? How is it NOT 12?

What would you tell this little kid? In his 'world" it's logical, in ours its not.

You're like that little kid, except with music. You don't know what you don't know.

Best,

Sean
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