#1
I've started listening to blues/blues rock recently and I love how smooth and powerful the guitar lines are.

I was wondering how I would go about starting to play the blues as well. I know the minor pentatonic scale and im in the process of learning the scale modes. Anything else I should look into?
Bass gear:
-Squier Vintage Modified Jazz Bass
-Fender Rumble 15 Amp

Guitar Gear:
-Agile AL-2000
-Boss Tu-3 Tuner -> Joyo Vintage Overdrive -> Joyo Vintage Ultimate Overdrive -> Ernie Ball MVP -> TC Nova Repeater
#2
Just put on your favorite blues tracks and jump in the groove and jam along. Lot's of good how-to vids on youtube when you get stuck. Larry Carlton and Red ?? are two that I like on Truefire.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#3
You'll find most of the blues greats didn't and do not study theory particularly intensely. It's certainly not a problem, and the more you can study the more you'll be able to do. But theory won't teach you the value of a slightly flat bend, or repeating the same note eight times in a row, or playing a sharper note than you're 'supposed' to. It also won't teach you the timing, both on and off.

What Cajundaddy said is pretty much how every great blues player did. Listen to songs you like and just start playing along. Try to work out, without using tabs or lessons, how the song is being played. Try to improvise your own parts over the top.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
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#4
^ yeah

i dunno if you really need the modes. fusion and stuff like that tends to use the modes more. i'd never really use modes if i'm playing blues (not that i'm a killer blues player or anything like that... or that i even use modes that much when i'm not playing blues )

minor pentatonic and the blues scale (combined judiciously with the major third, minor third bent slightly sharp and major 6th) are arguably far more useful. once you know those it's just a matter of listening to killer blues solos and seeing how they do it and how they work

edit: also look up youtube for some stock blues licks. that'll probably be more useful than learning modes, too.
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Last edited by Dave_Mc at Mar 28, 2014,
#5
Don't bother with the modes. Just don't.

Study some of the blues great. Learn their songs. Figure out why that really great lick "worked". Then, learn how to use the basic ideas of the lick (no copying!) to come up with something unique.
#6
Thanks for the advice!

Quote by Dave_Mc

minor pentatonic and the blues scale (combined judiciously with the major third, minor third bent slightly sharp and major 6th) are arguably far more useful. once you know those it's just a matter of listening to killer blues solos and seeing how they do it and how they work


What exactly is the blues scale? I've googled it and it just looks like the minor pent. scale.
Bass gear:
-Squier Vintage Modified Jazz Bass
-Fender Rumble 15 Amp

Guitar Gear:
-Agile AL-2000
-Boss Tu-3 Tuner -> Joyo Vintage Overdrive -> Joyo Vintage Ultimate Overdrive -> Ernie Ball MVP -> TC Nova Repeater
#7
^ it's the minor pentatonic with the added flat 5th

or you can sort of have the "extended" blues scale which is kind of like a mix of the major and minor pentatonics.

Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Don't bother with the modes. Just don't.

Study some of the blues great. Learn their songs. Figure out why that really great lick "worked". Then, learn how to use the basic ideas of the lick (no copying!) to come up with something unique.


everyone copies
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#8
The Blues mantra: "take what you need and make it your own."
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#9
Learn how to play blues rhythm - the chords are the most important part.

Once you know the chords, you can start using the notes in those chords to play solos. The classic blues sound is a mix of minor and major chord tones.

Blues harmony is simple enough you can start learning solos by ear right away. Pay attention to what notes they play over which chords.
Last edited by cdgraves at Mar 28, 2014,
#10
With any styles of guitar music blues is more about feel and emotions than any other.

The notes are not that important but the impact does.

Best advice is to listen, absorb and get into it. Take Jimi Hendrix red house and machinegun, Albert King, Freddie King and BB king. Then move forward.