#1
Hi everyone! So for a year its been my passion writing lyrics towards help people who suffer from depression, cutting, and anorexia. I've written over 150 songs and I just pour hours into it. I've also played guitar for 8 years. It became clear that it was my dream to be a solo songwriter/singer, music has had such an impact on me and I want to help people through music. So a few months ago I watched a few youtube videos and put together a warm up session and I've been gathering info since. The problem is, I was never born a good singer. I'm horrible. And I've gotten mixed responses on every website I read, is it possible to get better? I am only 16 years old, and I absolutely love singing, but I'm really bad at it. I am considering buying online singing lessons (Superior Singing Method, or AApproach). Is it even worth the bother? I am really worried maybe I'm just born a crappy singer... But I really really want to become amazing. I've never been more motivated! I just am wondering if it's worth a shot. Thanks for reading =P
#2
Saying you were born a crappy singer and avoiding it is like someone who's never played guitar saying they were born a crappy guitarist and never wanting to play.

The voice is an instrument like any other. It'll require a bunch of work to get to where you want.

I would recommend vocal lessons with a teacher and not just a recording or video. Teachers can pinpoint what you're doing wrong and believe me, with singing, there will always be an "am I doing this technique wrong?" Uncertainty.

TL;DR anybody can become a good singer. Some might be born with a greater aptitude towards it but with training and work, you can be good.
#3
It depends on what your issue happens to be.

Tone deaf? Nope, can't fix that.
Raw, unpolished technique? Of course that can be rectified.

And depending on your material - Dylan or Tom Waits, not great vocalists.
Last edited by AngryHatter at Mar 29, 2014,
#4
For me I struggled with hitting the appropriate notes when I first started. I had trouble with pitch recognition. I was really pitchy. If that's what you mean by "tone deaf" then you can absolutely fix that.
#5
Quote by Milan999
For me I struggled with hitting the appropriate notes when I first started. I had trouble with pitch recognition. I was really pitchy. If that's what you mean by "tone deaf" then you can absolutely fix that.

That is not being tone deaf. That is just having crappy pitch recognition. There is a thing called tone deafness, and that is one of the few things that'll prevent someone from being able to train themself into an goodish singer.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tone_deafness

In pretty much all other cases, you can train yourself to a good singer.
#6
Your best bet is getting Singing Success by brett manning, especially if you do singer/songwriter stuff. Coupled with some lessons from a good vocal coach and your off to the races. Depending on your voice, learning to sing effortlessly WELL, takes a long time, like years, so be prepared to work hard if your not a natural.
#7
as a voice teacher, I'd be out of the job if it wasn't.

As to the post above, I absolutely hate when people are following a singing program like the brett manning thing while taking lessons with me. They work on so many things in contrast to what I'm teaching them, or try to mix in different techniques that just don't work for the style we're going for, and it cripples progress.
#8
Quote by Milan999
Saying you were born a crappy singer and avoiding it is like someone who's never played guitar saying they were born a crappy guitarist and never wanting to play.


THIS. Sing as you play. Sing as you tune your guitar. Echo your guitar riffs with your voice. LISTEN to your voice objectively, hear where you are missing the notes, and correct yourself. You can modulate the pitch of your voice just like you can slide your finger along the strings of your guitar. If you cannot sing well, it is because you are choosing not to take the time to practice this skill.

Ken
Bernie Sanders for President!
#9
Quote by Tyson2011
as a voice teacher, I'd be out of the job if it wasn't.

As to the post above, I absolutely hate when people are following a singing program like the brett manning thing while taking lessons with me. They work on so many things in contrast to what I'm teaching them, or try to mix in different techniques that just don't work for the style we're going for, and it cripples progress.



True I hadn't thought of that. But I feel my point still stands. However, the singing program and the teacher need to be from the same methodology. For instance, Singing Success is a SLS program, so it would be ideal to then pair up with an SLS teacher, I know of some singers who have done this to great gain.
#11
From bad to decent is easy enough...because its technique and pitch. Unless you're completely tone-deaf, you can learn good technique and good pitch and be a decent singer. Being a good singer however...has nothing to do with technique. You can be a great singer without great technique, people like Alice Cooper, Tom Waits, Johnny Cash, and Ozzy Osbourne come to mind. Why? Because they convey emotion, because they take text and lyrics and move millions of people with melodies and harmonies, because its honest. If you want to observe a great TECHNICIAN, go someone sing their senior vocal recital at a local university. If you wanna see a great singer, find your local Sebastian Bach.
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