#1
Hello

In a few days im getting a Schecter hellraiser c7 special and need help with string tension since i used to play all along 25'5

Guitar will be fully tuned 1,5 step down and two full steps?

Generally gonna use for G standard strings :

75 56 44 32 18 14 11

and For G# Standard

72 54 42 30 19 15 11


What will be tension on each string with 26.5 scale?
#2
If you want to know the precise tension, use these:

http://wahiduddin.net/calc/calc_guitar_string.htm

http://www.mcdonaldstrings.com/stringxxiii.html


As a general rule:

Every half-inch you add or subtract from the scale length, you need to subtract or add .0005 to the string gauge to keep roughly the same tension. So, for example, a .010 string on 25.5" scale has roughly the same tension as a .0105 string on a 25" scale guitar, if they are tuned the same.

Every half-step you tune up or down, you need to subtract or add .0005 to the string gauge to keep roughly the same tension. So, for example, a .010 string tuned to E has roughly the same tension as a .0105 string tuned to Eb, if the scale length is the same.

By combining these two, you can start to work out how to get the same tension no matter what scale length and tuning you move to.

For example, if you increase the scale length by one whole inch (subtract .001 from the gauge) and tune the guitar down by half a step (add .0005 to the gauge), your overall difference is to use a string gauge .0005 lighter.
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#3
The tension will be tighter going from 25.5 to 26.5 if you don't change string gauges. If you want to keep the same tension you could go down to 10s but for that low I'd stick with 11s like you are.
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#4
Thanks for replies but this doesnt really solve things ;P Cant find right calculator for these
#5
The problem is that your first post isn't very clear. It first sounds like you want to know how to match the tension, but then you say you've already decided what strings you'll be using and want to know what tension that equals anyway.

So, do you want to know:
A) the tension of those strings in each tuning at that scale length
OR
B) what strings you should use to give equal tension

'A' is resolved by the links I posted; you can look up any string gauge for any scale length and any tuning and it will give you the resulting tension. 'B' is resolved by the rest of our posts, it's just a question of using a lighter gauge as you increase scale length and/or tune higher.
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#6
Quote by rockstar256
Thanks for replies but this doesnt really solve things ;P Cant find right calculator for these


What part you don't understand? Each string will be the tighter on 26.5 than on 25.5. If you want the same tension in the same tuning you use on your 25.5 then just get strings that are little bit thinner for 26.5.
#7
Quote by rockstar256
Thanks for replies but this doesnt really solve things ;P Cant find right calculator for these

Fibble gave you a calculator. Two of them, in fact.

Use the first one. Write down all the tensions for your old strings and add each individual tension up to get a total. (Make sure to use 25.5 inches as scale length.) Then, write down all the tensions for your new strings and add those up. (Use 26.5 inches as new scale length.) Compare the two totals.


The new tension should be higher than the old. SO...you either need to set up the guitar with 26.5 scale, or pay a guitar tech to do it for you. If you've never done a proper setup of your guitar, then I recommend paying the tech.
Otherwise, you need to get lighter strings. You can use the first calculator Fibble gave you to calculate the tensions for a lighter set of strings. I would try to get within 5 pounds (~2.25kg) of the old tension. That should be a "safe zone", which means you wouldn't have to adjust the truss rod. Although, you will need to adjust intonation, action, etc. still.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Apr 1, 2014,