#1
Hey guys, I'm a progressive metal guitarist and I play in a band with music similar to Dream Theater, Haken, Porcupine Tree, etc. I'm looking into buying a multi fx processor for around $500 .

The main tone requirements I have are :
1. A bright clean tone with reverb
2. Heavy Petrucci-like distortion for riffing
3. Warm lead tone

A common complaint I've read about the Line 6 HD400 is that the tones sound too "digital". Would you recommend this processor for my purposes? What else should I look into?

Any help will be greatly appreciated.
#2
Quote by metallimaiden90
Hey guys, I'm a progressive metal guitarist and I play in a band with music similar to Dream Theater, Haken, Porcupine Tree, etc. I'm looking into buying a multi fx processor for around $500 .

The main tone requirements I have are :
1. A bright clean tone with reverb
2. Heavy Petrucci-like distortion for riffing
3. Warm lead tone

A common complaint I've read about the Line 6 HD400 is that the tones sound too "digital". Would you recommend this processor for my purposes? What else should I look into?

Any help will be greatly appreciated.



If you got $500 you may as well spring for the POD HD500 or the 500X if you can find one used. If your main concerns are cleans and distortions the 500's amp and cab modelling kicks the shit out of any other MFX processor. You other options are the Boss GT-10 or GT-100, which have not as good modelling (which means not as good distortion and clean tones) but the on board effects are better. Like, I've even heard of people selling their tape delays and echos because the GT replicates them perfectly. The only thing is you really need to read into the manual and learn how to use it to get it's full potential.

Then you have the RP1000.... which..... it's meh (compared to the Boss and POD).

Overall if your main concerns are just basic tones, get the HD500. The effects are good enough to get you by.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#3
Up for the used HD500x idea, among the modelers I can't think of a better sounding one in your price range.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#4
I've got the HD300.

When it came to choosing between them, I was advised that the 400 is pretty pointless - it doesn't encompass the features of the HD500 and no HD500X nor is it a huge upgrade on the 300.

So echoing the posters above, go for the 500 or 500X.

After tweaking with the 300 for a while, I've found it isn't too digital and with the 500 series you can have stuff like dual amp sims and multiple effects in different banks, which is really beneficial.

If you can afford it, try go for the PODHD Pro, check out ola englunds demo of it its pretty sweet
Gear

ESP LTD EC-401
Jackson DK2M
Line 6 POD HD300
#5
^ unless you need the extra mic pre, you're better off getting an HD500x.
It's the same thing except for the pre and the shape - the pro is rackmountable and the HD500x is footswitchable.
Though the HD500x is $200 or so cheaper.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#6
Get the 500. You literally can get a used 500 for 300-400 dollars if you play your cards right. While the 300 and 400 are ok, you might as well go ahead and get the 500. It's honestly the best floor modeler in the price range of under 600 dollars.
#7
The HD400 doesn't have the flexibility of programming that the HD500 has. The 400 has a fixed FX chain, whereas the 500 allows any stomp assigned in any position. Any of the HD series should satisfy your tone needs provided you can find the right settings matched to your PA or amp. Tweaking a multifx is a skill of it's own.
#8
Quote by fly135
The HD400 doesn't have the flexibility of programming that the HD500 has. The 400 has a fixed FX chain, whereas the 500 allows any stomp assigned in any position. Any of the HD series should satisfy your tone needs provided you can find the right settings matched to your PA or amp. Tweaking a multifx is a skill of it's own.

One thing I also like on the 500 vs 400 is the ability to use the lower 4 switches to change patches at the same time as having the upper 4 to turn off individual effects within a patch at the same time.