#1
Hi everyone.

I´m looking for somebody who can share PERSONAL experience with the sound/tone of these BOSS pedals:

SD-1 Super Overdrive
BD-2 Blues Driver
BC-2 Combo Drive
FDR-1 Fender 65 De Luxe simulator
FBM-1 Fender Bassman simulator.

What I need is a pedal that would give me a smooth, velvet-soft vintage kind of sound, from breakup to mid-heavy crunch.... I have a Laney Ironheart Studio, great amp, fantastic for heavier rock and metal, but a bit too agressive for vintage blues/blues-rock styles. And I can´t invest in a whole new vintage-sounding amp. All I can afford is a pedal, to combine with the Laney´s clean channel. And it has to be a BOSS pedal, because I have a chance to buy it extra cheap....

So pls share your experience: which of the 5 above mentioned models?

Thank you all in advance!
B.C. Rich, Cort, Engl, Engl, Engl, Epiphone, Epiphone, Fender, Fender, Gallien-Krueger, Gallien-Krueger, Ibanez, Ibanez, Ibanez, KRK, KRK, KRK, Laney, Line6, Michael Kelly, Schecter, VHT, Yamaha....
Last edited by Airfish at Apr 3, 2014,
#2
Boss pedals aren't really famous for producing vintage sounds, y' know.
I mean among these the one that will get you the most vintage like sound is the FMB-1, or maybe the BD-2.

If it doesn't really have to be from boss, have a look at the JHS charlie brown and the ZVEX box of rock.
Name's Luca.

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Last edited by Spambot_2 at Apr 3, 2014,
#3
Maybe some light overdrive, as more of a push for the clean channel for those sort of sounds? Something like that BD-2 Blues Driver. I have the Keeley Modded one and that's exactly what you'd want it for! Light bluesy crunch (clever name, i know...).

If you're so fussed by saving money to direct you into the Boss territory, i'm sure you can find lots of pedals to do the same job better for equally cheap. I actually prefer my cheap as fudge Ibanez TS-7 Tubescreamer for the smooth, blues overdrive. Cost me £20-30 on ebay...
The Blues Driver is much brighter and crunchier i find, good with my Les Paul!
#6
Quote by I K0nijn I
Can't your Pod HD take care of what you want?


....nope.... the pod is just my tweaking toy, with all them 2-channel twin-amp stereo fx computer-games .... Cool sounds in there, but nowhere near real amps, or real pedals....
B.C. Rich, Cort, Engl, Engl, Engl, Epiphone, Epiphone, Fender, Fender, Gallien-Krueger, Gallien-Krueger, Ibanez, Ibanez, Ibanez, KRK, KRK, KRK, Laney, Line6, Michael Kelly, Schecter, VHT, Yamaha....
#7
Quote by Airfish
....nope.... the pod is just my tweaking toy, with all them 2-channel twin-amp stereo fx computer-games .... Cool sounds in there, but nowhere near real amps, or real pedals....



Dont sell it short. Connect it to the FX Return of your Laney and disable cab simulation in the pod. I dont know how HD series works but I also have to set output into Power Amp in my Pod X3 to remove all other coloration. Lots of low gain amps there and surely better sounding than Boss pedals. The tube poweramp and your cab will make it sound real enough.

ESP LTD F-50 + Tonezone
Cort EVL-Z4 + X2N
Cort EVL-K47B

Marshall Valvestate 8100
Randall RG1503
Bugera 333
Peavey Rockmaster preamp

Line6 Pod X3
#8
Quote by Airfish
....nope.... the pod is just my tweaking toy, with all them 2-channel twin-amp stereo fx computer-games .... Cool sounds in there, but nowhere near real amps, or real pedals....


The drive sounds the Pod can produce are much better than any Boss drive pedal I've heard, to be honest.
#9
None of the above. If you want the range of a basic flat boost up to a slight mids overdrive, the OD-3 is the Boss pedal for you. The BD-2 is totally flat and the SD-1 is nothing but mids. The three other pedals you listed are distortion pedals which won't work as an overdrive, which is what you need if you're going after a bluesy overdrive tone.

Don't forget to fully experiment with your amp's settings. The Ironheart Studio has a flat boost already built into it, and the full combination of EQ controls, frequency shift controls for each EQ control, master tone and dynamic/variable power control should allow you to dial in a blues/rock tone by itself. Try setting the mid EQ control higher with the frequency pulled, the treble rolled back, the overall tone down a little, the gain low and the power (dynamics) squashing the amp down to a wattage where it will actually saturate naturally, like 3w or so. Then there's the boost to use as a basic drive.
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#10
Quote by Airfish
....nope.... the pod is just my tweaking toy, with all them 2-channel twin-amp stereo fx computer-games .... Cool sounds in there, but nowhere near real amps, or real pedals....
What you really need is practicing at programming sounds with your pod.
For ****in' serious, I've never heard a boss distortion pedal sound as good as a POD.
I've never heard a boss distortion pedal sound that good in general.

For ****'s sake, "nowhere near real pedals"?
For ****'s sake

The problem with digital stuff are the processing and the conversion.
The conversion in the pod is good, and the processing is too.
For what you wanna do and for most stuff really, a pod will be better than pedals, and I can't think of one single case in which it would be better than a boss pedal.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#11
Quote by Spambot_2
What you really need is practicing at programming sounds with your pod.
For ****in' serious, I've never heard a boss distortion pedal sound as good as a POD.
I've never heard a boss distortion pedal sound that good in general.

For ****'s sake, "nowhere near real pedals"?
For ****'s sake

The problem with digital stuff are the processing and the conversion.
The conversion in the pod is good, and the processing is too.
For what you wanna do and for most stuff really, a pod will be better than pedals, and I can't think of one single case in which it would be better than a boss pedal.



I can imagine you might be right, with the Pod, thanx for your views on that.... but I have it in a separate rig and can´t connect it to the Laney - I would have to sacrifice one of my two rigs completely - the Pod has to stay in my "bedroom/desktop" rig, beacuse I also use it as a cab simulator and fx processor for my Engl preamp. So for my other rig, based around the Laney, it has to be pedals, unless I can tweek some vintage tones from the Laney itself....
B.C. Rich, Cort, Engl, Engl, Engl, Epiphone, Epiphone, Fender, Fender, Gallien-Krueger, Gallien-Krueger, Ibanez, Ibanez, Ibanez, KRK, KRK, KRK, Laney, Line6, Michael Kelly, Schecter, VHT, Yamaha....
#12
Quote by MrFlibble
None of the above. If you want the range of a basic flat boost up to a slight mids overdrive, the OD-3 is the Boss pedal for you. The BD-2 is totally flat and the SD-1 is nothing but mids. The three other pedals you listed are distortion pedals which won't work as an overdrive, which is what you need if you're going after a bluesy overdrive tone.

Don't forget to fully experiment with your amp's settings. The Ironheart Studio has a flat boost already built into it, and the full combination of EQ controls, frequency shift controls for each EQ control, master tone and dynamic/variable power control should allow you to dial in a blues/rock tone by itself. Try setting the mid EQ control higher with the frequency pulled, the treble rolled back, the overall tone down a little, the gain low and the power (dynamics) squashing the amp down to a wattage where it will actually saturate naturally, like 3w or so. Then there's the boost to use as a basic drive.


Thanx mate, I haven´t tried that kind of setting yet, but I definitely would now, after your proposal....
B.C. Rich, Cort, Engl, Engl, Engl, Epiphone, Epiphone, Fender, Fender, Gallien-Krueger, Gallien-Krueger, Ibanez, Ibanez, Ibanez, KRK, KRK, KRK, Laney, Line6, Michael Kelly, Schecter, VHT, Yamaha....
#13
Quote by Airfish
I can imagine you might be right, with the Pod, thanx for your views on that.... but I have it in a separate rig and can´t connect it to the Laney - I would have to sacrifice one of my two rigs completely - the Pod has to stay in my "bedroom/desktop" rig, beacuse I also use it as a cab simulator and fx processor for my Engl preamp. So for my other rig, based around the Laney, it has to be pedals, unless I can tweek some vintage tones from the Laney itself....
Uh, sorry.
Well up for MrFlibble's idea then.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#14
Quote by Spambot_2
Boss pedals aren't really famous for producing vintage sounds, y' know.
I mean among these the one that will get you the most vintage like sound is the FMB-1, or maybe the BD-2.

If it doesn't really have to be from boss, have a look at the JHS charlie brown and the ZVEX box of rock.


This. Boss isn't good with producing vintage sounds. The best you'll get is their overdrives. I really don't like their distortions, they all sound thin and sound just like poor fuzz boxes instead of distortion.

Either check out their overdrives or check out other companies pedals. You don't have to stick with BOSS you know.

Edit: I think Spambot is my new friend.
Last edited by Clay-man at Apr 4, 2014,
#15
Are those the only options you have? You might be better off with a CS-3 or a GE-7. A compressor and/or EQ can do wonders for giving you a more vintage tone, especially if you boost the signal with them. I haven't played any of those specifically so I don't know if the Boss variants are that good but maybe someone else can comment on that. Compressors are a great tool for getting close to the response and feel of a vintage amp. They can add punch. EQ pedals are good for getting the tone of them. They can make your tone fatter. Combined, you can get a punchy and fat tone from the thin and dull tone you typically get from running a high gain amp with low gain.
#16
^ a compressor?
For vintage tones?
A compressor is kinda the opposite of what a vintage tone sounds like.

The sounds gets compressed because of the tube rectifier that cuts the sound a bit when playing particularly loud passages, and (mostly) because of the fact that the power section is being overdriven.
Being overdriven, it creates a bit of compression and a bit more distortion than when not compressing the sound, though a compressor would defeat the thing reducing the gain of the signal before distortion, so you'd get a more constant distortion level and an even more constant volume level, which it isn't really not what a vintage amp sounds like.
Quote by Clay-man
This. Boss isn't good with producing vintage sounds. The best you'll get is their overdrives. I really don't like their distortions, they all sound thin and sound just like poor fuzz boxes instead of distortion.

Either check out their overdrives or check out other companies pedals. You don't have to stick with BOSS you know.

Edit: I think Spambot is my new friend.

Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.