#1
So, I have a decent enough Ibanez guitar but, as I'm actually not into metal, I decided to get another brand.
The thing is: I wanna get a model that produces as little pick sounds as possible. One of my main turn-offs with the guitar is the discontinuity in the sound compared to other instruments, like the saxophone. A diminished pick attack helps a little bit overcome this particular issue.
Anybody has suggestions regarding brands &/or models?
For the record, I generally like to play progressive rock and jazz.
#2
I could suggest all kinds of guitars to you, but pick attack is all about technique.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#3
Quote by dannyalcatraz
I could suggest all kinds of guitars to you, but pick attack is all about technique.

I'd say it's about half-half. Using the right pick and playing with the right angle is a a big influence, but the tone of the guitar makes a huge difference too. Telecasters, for example, have lots of pick attack.
#4
The dunlop stubby/big stubby bits poly carbonate and very smooth. I play metal and predfer not to use the big stubby because it doesn't have enough attack it's very rounded so the strings just slide off I instead of getting that harsh snap if you will. Try it out may be what your looking for
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#5
Quote by TYSHADOWS
The dunlop stubby/big stubby bits poly carbonate and very smooth. I play metal and predfer not to use the big stubby because it doesn't have enough attack it's very rounded so the strings just slide off I instead of getting that harsh snap if you will. Try it out may be what your looking for



I had forgotten the importance of the pick shape & material. And I really shouldn't have, given that I use things like jade & carbon fiber, in a variety of shapes, for reasons such as that.

But I still don't think the guitar has much to do with the attack.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Apr 3, 2014,
#6
^unless it's acoustic or baritone or something I doubt I would.
From personal experiance with it this pick seems like your best option besides switching up technique
http://www.jimdunlop.com/product/stubby
-Main Gear-
ESP Ltd V-401 + D Activator N&B
De Armond/Guild 2000 M72 Bluesbird w/ USA Toastertops
Peavey JSX & XXL
Mesa Boogie Rectifier Vertical 2x12
Airis Effects Savage Drive
Last edited by TYSHADOWS at Apr 3, 2014,
#7
I second Big Stubbies. You can also try different strings. But don't be so down on the Ibanez. I don't play metal either but I use it for the same things I use my Strat for. I usually play clean and lightly driven stuff and the Ibanez sounds marvelous for it.
#9
Use the pick backwards. I use dunlop tortex .50 mm picks but I use the rear end and not the pointy end.
Last edited by Spud Spudly at Apr 4, 2014,
#10
Quote by leonardo.michel
So, I have a decent enough Ibanez guitar but, as I'm actually not into metal, I decided to get another brand.


Worth noting that nothing in the Ibanez brief says you have to play metal with that brand of guitar.

I picked up a gorgeous, near-pristine 1989 Carvin LB75 5-string bass in Ferrari Red for a song because the previous owner was now playing bowtie/tweed jacket jazz and thought the Carvin was too "rock and roll". So he decided he needed something more "woodie" looking.

I have a Variax JTV-89F that I very nearly overlooked as a guitar because it was obviously slanted toward the metal boys. Turns out the specs were near-perfect for me and unlike any of the other Variax choices.

Brands don't determine what you play on them.
#11
Quote by leonardo.michel

The thing is: I wanna get a model that produces as little pick sounds as possible. One of my main turn-offs with the guitar is the discontinuity in the sound compared to other instruments, like the saxophone. A diminished pick attack helps a little bit overcome this particular issue.


Has nothing to do with the guitar. It's all in the pick material and/or your technique. Worst case, learn to pick with your finger. Otherwise, go with a stiff pick (Stubbies or Gravity picks are what I'm using) with a light touch. Jazz players often work on the neck pickup rather than the bridge, and reduce the treble on either guitar or amp (and you can also consider dropping a GE-7 or MXR 108 10-band EQ into your rig right after the guitar to EQ a bit of the high treble out of there.

Another option for you might be to add a MIDI pickup and run it out to any one of a bunch of different MIDI controllers and synths that will modify your sound completely and eliminate any semblance of pick noise.

You might look into working with a guitar that has a Sustainer installed.