#1
Hey whats up guys,

so basically, heres whats up... i've got my guitar, dean stealth, tuned down to
b standard (B E A D F# b), its a licensed floyd trem... and yeah i was wondering
if theres any way to shed some tension off the strings?

i've had the guitar on this tuning for about a month or two now, and am happy
with everything, just that now since i wanna learn some solo stuff, i'd like to have
the string tension a bit lower without affecting the tuning....

right now it takes me quite some force to do a 1 step bend... just before having the
tuning at b, i was playing Eb, and i was even able to pull off 1 and half step bends
quite comfortably.

i've looked on google n etc and it just links me to "how to restring/setup a FR"

anyways, extra stuff i'd like to include is its a set of .13s that im using currently
so strings arent too flabby with the low tuning. i've played on a friends guitar who's
using .13-.60, tuned to C, and it almost felt like i was playing on .09s... so i dont think
its the string gauge. but yeah, it just feels a bit tense on my guitar.

any help is appreciated,
cheers.
-N
#2
The only solution I would think of is your guitar not being setup for tuning; that's probably why you're getting "how to setup a Floyd" on google. If you were able to do a 1 1/2 step bend in Eb standard on 13s, but can't do a whole step bend in B standard, you should definitely look into gettin gthe Floyd Rose setup on it.

Just a quick question: Does your friend's guitar have a Floyd Rose on it?
Skip the username, call me Billy
#3
check your setup on the trem-- a lot of metal players use super thick strings in Eb and do 1 1/2 step bends
#4
Quote by aerosmithfan95
The only solution I would think of is your guitar not being setup for tuning; that's probably why you're getting "how to setup a Floyd" on google. If you were able to do a 1 1/2 step bend in Eb standard on 13s, but can't do a whole step bend in B standard, you should definitely look into gettin gthe Floyd Rose setup on it.

Just a quick question: Does your friend's guitar have a Floyd Rose on it?



sorry for the confusion, i had 10s when i was in Eb, and set it up myself and got a good result... tried the same with the lower tuning and thicker strings.. and well i mean i felt it was fine till now... just that im practicing to play faster, and i feel im having to exert too much energy to fret the notes.... also as far as the bending thing goes... i can still pull off the 1 step, just that it requires a good amount of force to get to it compared to before..

would you suggest restringing the thing and setting up from scratch?

i've been doing my setups myself coz theres no1 around that i can trust with it...
everyone else i've been to made things worse in one way or another..

oh and the dude had a stop tail
#5
Since you jumped from 10s to 13s, that'll require a set up on a Floyd Rose even if you were still in Eb standard. Going down to a lower tuning will require you to set up your Floyd Rose for that tuning. If I were you, I'd stick to one string gauge and tuning for your guitar since different tunings will require to always setup the guitar again.

Stop tails are different than Floyd Roses. Stop tails are locked in place while a Floyd (or any form of vibrato) adjusts with the tension of the strings. Since your friend has a Stop tail, all he really has to worry about is the slight intonation and neck if he's constantly changing tunings.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#6
I would think that a truss rod adjustment would be in store as well, that is a shift in tension to go from 10s to 13s, I would think the neck would need adjusting.
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#7
It's important to point out that how stiff strings feel when bending depends quite a lot on the tyep of bridge and nut you have. Floyds and other double-locking systems have the stiffest feel of all. Tune-o-matic and stopbar bridges with a teflon/graphite nut have the easiest feel. The condition, size and shape of the frets also dramatically influence how easy bends feel.

For B standard with a Floyd, I really don't know what you'd gain from using anything thicker than .012-.056. That's the point where you should be getting roughly the same tension when bending as a tune-o guitar with a normal .010 set in E Standard. You can also buy diffrent types of string, some of which are easier to bend than others; personally, I find Ernie Ball's titanium-coated strings to be the easiest for bends. So, first thing I'd do is reconsider your string selection.

Second thing to do is definitely give the whole guitar a proper set up. Give it the full works, nut height, fret crowning, everything. You'd be amazed at the difference a few 'minor' adjustments make.
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#8
Quote by MrFlibble


For B standard with a Floyd, I really don't know what you'd gain from using anything thicker than .012-.056. I find Ernie Ball's titanium-coated strings to be the easiest for bends.




i was actually just thinking about getting .12s and restringing...
and yeah at the moment i do have shitty d'adarios coz no1 in the area was selling
ernie ball... i've always used ernie ball before this, and loved em.
just found a site selling the same titanium ones... and a friend of mine here tried em
on his ibanez with a floating trem... and said he found it nice to play on...


as for the other stuff... i've only had this guitar for about 6 months or so...
would you still say do all that stuff like crowning n etc?

anyways cheers!
#9
If it's that new then you might be fine. Just be aware that even some brand new guitars don't have perfectly crowned and levelled frets. If your frets are rough then that'll make bending seem tougher.

Since it is new, rather than giving them a full crown and level right away, just give the frets a polish. I use the Dunlop Micro Fine Fret Polishing Cloths for this, though you can also get similar products from automotive stores. It's basically just a very lightly abrasive, slightly rubbery cloth which you run across the frets and it takes off the very worst of the roughness and dirt. Similar to steel wool or 2000 grit wet/dry sandpaper, only it's even finer. That should be fine for now, for a new guitar.
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