#1
Hey all,

I'm not so technically minded when it comes to amps, especially valve amps. I was wondering if there was anything you could use to 'push them' even more if that's the correct phrasing. You see, I like the overdrive channel on my amp but I just want even more distortion!!! Could some sort of booster increase the distortion or do they not work like that? Do they have their own limit? And could it even damage them?

Any suggestions?

Thanks.
#2
Quote by FrooFender
I was wondering if there was anything you could use to 'push them' even more if that's the correct phrasing. You see, I like the overdrive channel on my amp but I just want even more distortion!!!
That's what boost and overdrive pedals were made for.

And could it even damage them?
Not at all, unless you do something really silly like stacking seven or eight maxed-out boosts in a row. Even then, your amp would have to be pretty low-power for it to cause any damage.

Boosts and overdrive pedals come in lots of different styles and offer many different tones. Exactly what kind of sound are you hoping for, and what is your current amplifier?
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#3
That's what we use overdrives for. There are plenty of good ones. A cheap one to wet your lips with is the Digitech Bad Monkey. It's basically a Tubescreamer with a bass knob added to it.
To do what you want, you keep the gain/drive knob down low and the level/volume turned right up.
Another way it is done is to use an EQ pedal. MXR 10 band is best pedal one. Best cheap one is the Danelectro Fish & Chips.
People also do it with compressors but that introduces an extra effect as well so it is a little different. Can still be very effective for pushing the front of the amp harder though.


Edit: Even 50 of them can't hurt anything. They can only produce the maximum voltage that the last one can produce. That is limited by the 9V (or even 18V in the case of the MXR10) battery. The last one simply can't produce an output that can break anything.
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Last edited by Cathbard at Apr 5, 2014,
#4
^ Eh, an amp with a single pre amp valve isn't going to like it if it's expecting an instrument level signal and you chain enough pedals to push the signal to +105dB. Voltage isn't the issue.

But yes, that would not be a normal situation and OP does not need to worry about such things.
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#5
Quote by MrFlibble
That's what boost and overdrive pedals were made for.


OHHHHH! Haha, well you can see how little knowledge I have XD I thought they were just for crunchy gain sounds.

I have a Blackstar Ht 20, soon to be a ht 40 but they have the same valves. Two ecc83 and two El34. I'm just after a really heavy balls-to-the-walls distortion sound. Like typical heavy metal distortion but I'd shape the tone to what I want. I have a Boss Turbo Distortion but I just want even more! See, I usually play the clean channel and then kick the Turbo on when I want a lead sound. Could it be possible then to actually use it in conjunction with the overdrive channel on the amp? Or would I need an actual overdrive/boost pedal?
#6
Try it as a boost : volume max, gain off and tone to taste. If it works then you have a solution without spending more money, if it does not give you the results your wanting, try an Overdrive pedal like a Bad Monkey or any Tube Screamer type pedal like the Joyo Vintage OD if you want to keep cost down. If that does not work, you need to start looking at new amps because yours is not the right amp for you.
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#7
The only difference between the HT20 and 40 is the extra clean headroom. If you're trying to get a metal tone out of them then it'll actually be easier with the 20. So, bear that in mind. Also, both amps are 1x12" combos, which are never going to give you terribly full bass for a 'heavy' metal tone. You might want to consider buying an extension cabinet for your current amp, instead, so you have more speakers giving you a louder, fuller sound.

The Boss DS-2 can sort of do 80s metal distortion by itself, but really it's more of a hard rock or 80s pop rock kind of distortion. Prince uses it a lot, with a Boss overdrive to boost it for a lead tone, and even that isn't very 'metal'. If you set it for quite high distortion and set the amp clean with the mids reduced a little bit, you should be able to get a basic, generic metal tone. But yeah, it's probably not too ideal.

Personally, I do not consider the HT combo amps to have enough gain to do 'heavy' metal, even with the gain put quite high and a heavy boost in front of them. With a Tube Screamer-style overdrive, they will do hard rock and classic, late 70s metal very well. If you take your DS-2, set it to the first 'mode' of distortion, put the gain quite low (barely above minimum) and the level quite high (about three quarters), you should get a rough idea of how much further an OD pedal will push your amp.

What I'd do is leave the amp running clean and use a distortion pedal, one more suited to metal than the DS-2. A DigiTech HardWire TL-2 or Blackstar HT-DISTX will give you an instant heavy metal tone with a lot of control over the EQ shaping.
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#8
Man, they're just a class A amplifier. The output voltage swing can't exceed the supply rails. So even in an ideal world with 100% efficiency, working all the way to the rails with an 18V rail, the maximum voltage it can supply is about 6V rms. It won't sound very good but 6V isn't gonna hurt the grid of a 12AX7. You can't break a tube with the output of an op-amp running at 9 or 18V. You just can't do it, i don't care how many you stick up each other's arse, the valve won't break.
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Last edited by Cathbard at Apr 5, 2014,
#9
I boosted my HT-1R with a Joyo VOD in this vid. Gain almost all the way up on the amp, and pedal gain at zero. Someone wanted to see how it sounds for metal. Not the best quality since I used a cell phone but you can get the jist of it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yo-_PTfEO88
[..BLACKFIRE..]
#10
Quote by Cathbard
Man, they're just a class A amplifier. The output voltage swing can't exceed the supply rails. So even in an ideal world with 100% efficiency, working all the way to the rails with an 18V rail, the maximum voltage it can supply is about 6V rms. It won't sound very good but 6V isn't gonna hurt the grid of a 12AX7. You can't break a tube with the output of an op-amp running at 9 or 18V. You just can't do it, i don't care how many you stick up each other's arse, the valve won't break.

Again:
Quote by MrFlibble
Voltage isn't the issue.
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#11
WTF? You found a way around Ohm's law? You getting current without voltage or something? WTF are you talking about?
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#12
Quote by MrFlibble

Not at all, unless you do something really silly like stacking seven or eight maxed-out boosts in a row. Even then, your amp would have to be pretty low-power for it to cause any damage.


Quote by MrFlibble
^ Eh, an amp with a single pre amp valve isn't going to like it if it's expecting an instrument level signal and you chain enough pedals to push the signal to +105dB. Voltage isn't the issue.

But yes, that would not be a normal situation and OP does not need to worry about such things.


This isn't correct. It doesn't matter how much gain you have in your signal path once you start running into problems with railing out. If your pedals are powered off 9V, you'll never have more than a 9V (and will almost never actually be rail to rail output) no matter what your gain. You'll just get serious clipping.

Think about it. If you have 105 dB, that's a voltage gain of 177,000. Let's assume that you've turned your guitar up, you've got high output humbuckers, and the level coming out of your guitar is 1 V in amplitude. If you feed that into 177,000 V/V, your pedals "want" to out put a 177,000 V signal. But is that actually going to happen? Of course not. You're limited by the bias at each stage, and you'll just start clipping at the rails. The best you'll get is 9V, but what you'll certainly get is something less than 9 V that looks like a square wave instead of the original sinusoidal input.

Similarily, if you hit the amp with this signal, the worst thing that's going to happen is you're going to saturate the signal and get rail clipping from the first gain stage of your amp.
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#13
50 tubescreamers into a Fender Champ, that would be awesome.
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#14
Sigh. Apologies to the OP, because this has now become an absolute farce and irrelevant to their question, but apparently some people can't understand basic English.

I will repeat this again: voltage is not the issue. At all. If you give voltage a second thought, you're already way off-track. You're imagining the problem I am talking about is a different problem to the one I am talking about. You might as well be saying that stacking multiple boosts isn't a problem because your guitar is painted red. You're talking about a completely irrelevant aspect. Yes, I know that dB is often measured as a relative unit to a base voltage, but as anybody with half a working brain knows, you can have two subjects giving the same voltage but different dB readings and dB is not used to measure voltage only. So, one last time, stop talking about voltage. It is not the issue.

Running a louder subject—remember, we're talking decibels, not voltage—causes saturation and clipping, yes? We're all agreed on that? Good. Most valves can clip from higher output guitar signal alone, something like active pickups, for instance. Those tend to give you an unamplified volume of about -16db. That's enough for a valve to run short of headroom, for lack of a better term, and signal clipping begins.
Now, there is a certain point, different for any given valve, at which it's being driven so hard we can say that the entire signal is being wholly clipped. This is usually in the area of +55dB to +85dB. Of course, other components along the signal chain may also max out; your typical stompbox pedal starts clipping with a +4dB signal, let alone +55dB or more. But that's another issue.
Now, what do you think happens if you ramp the volume up even further? You're already at maximum saturation (and possibly ear-bursting sound pressure). That valve isn't going to last terribly long. A valve which should last a few years will be chewed through in a matter of months, possibly even just weeks.

Think of it this way: you don't point a camera at the sun and shoot a long exposure because you burn out the chip. There's enough light to make the picture entirely white... and then there's so much light the chip just gives up the ghost. It's exactly the same with a pre amp valve and volume. If you give the amp the equivalent of the sun, like stacking eight boosts in front of it, each set to give you a signal +15dB louder than the one before, you'll end up giving it about twice the signal it takes just to make the signal wholly clip. Do it once and you'll just get a nasty wall of inaudible noise. Run it like that often and that valve's not going to be around for long.

A single boost is usually set to give you between +10dB and +25dB. That, realistically, just brings your instrument level up to line level, sometimes not even that far. It'll cause more saturation and clipping, but not cause any damage whatsoever. You could stack a second boost and now you're about a third of the way to entirely clipping. So, you see, we are talking about absolutely ludicrous extremes. Nobody—at least, nobody with any sense—is going to take eight EQ pedals, put them all in a row and set each one to max out every band and play like that all the time. But it is entirely possible.


Take it from somebody who's witnessed £28,000 worth of hi-fi being written off by a gormless twonk who thought running a six-stage linear loop pre into his 1962 split centre valve pre would be "interesting." And if you're still hung up on voltage, know that that can't have been pushing more than about 5.5V.

And if you still don't understand it, just re-read this post again, because I'm literally only going to reply with "re-read my last post" anyway.


Right, OP, apologies again. Back to our regularly scheduled programming (i.e. your questions).
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#15


You should write for Letterman.
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#16
Quote by MrFlibble
Sigh. Apologies to the OP, because this has now become an absolute farce and irrelevant to their question, but apparently some people can't understand basic English.

I will repeat this again: voltage is not the issue. At all. If you give voltage a second thought, you're already way off-track. You're imagining the problem I am talking about is a different problem to the one I am talking about. You might as well be saying that stacking multiple boosts isn't a problem because your guitar is painted red. You're talking about a completely irrelevant aspect. Yes, I know that dB is often measured as a relative unit to a base voltage, but as anybody with half a working brain knows, you can have two subjects giving the same voltage but different dB readings and dB is not used to measure voltage only. So, one last time, stop talking about voltage. It is not the issue.

Running a louder subject—remember, we're talking decibels, not voltage—causes saturation and clipping, yes? We're all agreed on that? Good. Most valves can clip from higher output guitar signal alone, something like active pickups, for instance. Those tend to give you an unamplified volume of about -16db. That's enough for a valve to run short of headroom, for lack of a better term, and signal clipping begins.
Now, there is a certain point, different for any given valve, at which it's being driven so hard we can say that the entire signal is being wholly clipped. This is usually in the area of +55dB to +85dB. Of course, other components along the signal chain may also max out; your typical stompbox pedal starts clipping with a +4dB signal, let alone +55dB or more. But that's another issue.
Now, what do you think happens if you ramp the volume up even further? You're already at maximum saturation (and possibly ear-bursting sound pressure). That valve isn't going to last terribly long. A valve which should last a few years will be chewed through in a matter of months, possibly even just weeks.

Think of it this way: you don't point a camera at the sun and shoot a long exposure because you burn out the chip. There's enough light to make the picture entirely white... and then there's so much light the chip just gives up the ghost. It's exactly the same with a pre amp valve and volume. If you give the amp the equivalent of the sun, like stacking eight boosts in front of it, each set to give you a signal +15dB louder than the one before, you'll end up giving it about twice the signal it takes just to make the signal wholly clip. Do it once and you'll just get a nasty wall of inaudible noise. Run it like that often and that valve's not going to be around for long.

A single boost is usually set to give you between +10dB and +25dB. That, realistically, just brings your instrument level up to line level, sometimes not even that far. It'll cause more saturation and clipping, but not cause any damage whatsoever. You could stack a second boost and now you're about a third of the way to entirely clipping. So, you see, we are talking about absolutely ludicrous extremes. Nobody—at least, nobody with any sense—is going to take eight EQ pedals, put them all in a row and set each one to max out every band and play like that all the time. But it is entirely possible.


Take it from somebody who's witnessed £28,000 worth of hi-fi being written off by a gormless twonk who thought running a six-stage linear loop pre into his 1962 split centre valve pre would be "interesting." And if you're still hung up on voltage, know that that can't have been pushing more than about 5.5V.

And if you still don't understand it, just re-read this post again, because I'm literally only going to reply with "re-read my last post" anyway.


Right, OP, apologies again. Back to our regularly scheduled programming (i.e. your questions).


tl;dr
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#17
Quote by MrFlibble
Sigh. Apologies to the OP, because this has now become an absolute farce and irrelevant to their question, but apparently some people can't understand basic English.


You might ought to be sure that you're not making a complete ass of yourself before you start throwing around insults.

I will repeat this again: voltage is not the issue. At all. If you give voltage a second thought, you're already way off-track. You're imagining the problem I am talking about is a different problem to the one I am talking about. You might as well be saying that stacking multiple boosts isn't a problem because your guitar is painted red. You're talking about a completely irrelevant aspect. Yes, I know that dB is often measured as a relative unit to a base voltage, but as anybody with half a working brain knows, you can have two subjects giving the same voltage but different dB readings and dB is not used to measure voltage only. So, one last time, stop talking about voltage. It is not the issue.


If voltage isn't the issue what is? dB is nothing more than a ratio of quanties moved to a logarithmic scale. In terms of guitar amps and pedals, it almost always refers to voltage/voltage gain. If you're talking about something else, be explicit. Use absolute terms. Tell me exactly what is going to cause the problem. Is it voltage? Is it current? Is it power? What is stacking of the pedals going to cause, physically, electrically, that is going to cause harm. Since you're so much smarter than the rest of us who can't read basic English, I trust you can brush off your extensive electronics knowledge and educate me.

Running a louder subject—remember, we're talking decibels, not voltage—causes saturation and clipping, yes? We're all agreed on that? Good. Most valves can clip from higher output guitar signal alone, something like active pickups, for instance. Those tend to give you an unamplified volume of about -16db. That's enough for a valve to run short of headroom, for lack of a better term, and signal clipping begins.
Now, there is a certain point, different for any given valve, at which it's being driven so hard we can say that the entire signal is being wholly clipped. This is usually in the area of +55dB to +85dB. Of course, other components along the signal chain may also max out; your typical stompbox pedal starts clipping with a +4dB signal, let alone +55dB or more. But that's another issue.
Now, what do you think happens if you ramp the volume up even further? You're already at maximum saturation (and possibly ear-bursting sound pressure). That valve isn't going to last terribly long. A valve which should last a few years will be chewed through in a matter of months, possibly even just weeks.


What the **** do you think decibels actually means? It sounds like you're trying to ascribe sound intensity to pedals. That's not how pedals work. Pedals are, 99% of the time, voltage amplifiers. They do not amplify power or sound. They amplify a voltage signal. There is no "volume" coming from the output of a pedal. There is a voltage signal capable of driving a particular current.

Again, if you're so much smarter than me, explain exactly how these "decibels" that have nothing to do with voltage are actually working in the pedal, and how they're going to cause harm.

Think of it this way: you don't point a camera at the sun and shoot a long exposure because you burn out the chip. There's enough light to make the picture entirely white... and then there's so much light the chip just gives up the ghost. It's exactly the same with a pre amp valve and volume. If you give the amp the equivalent of the sun, like stacking eight boosts in front of it, each set to give you a signal +15dB louder than the one before, you'll end up giving it about twice the signal it takes just to make the signal wholly clip. Do it once and you'll just get a nasty wall of inaudible noise. Run it like that often and that valve's not going to be around for long.


The situations are not comparable. Stacking pedals in series has no way of providing more voltage, current, or power to the front end of an amp than simply using one pedal does. The pedal has physical limitations that cannot be exceeded no matter how many you stack before it.

A single boost is usually set to give you between +10dB and +25dB. That, realistically, just brings your instrument level up to line level, sometimes not even that far. It'll cause more saturation and clipping, but not cause any damage whatsoever. You could stack a second boost and now you're about a third of the way to entirely clipping. So, you see, we are talking about absolutely ludicrous extremes. Nobody—at least, nobody with any sense—is going to take eight EQ pedals, put them all in a row and set each one to max out every band and play like that all the time. But it is entirely possible.


You're confusing what dB means in terms of an EQ boost with what an overdrive pedal actually does--amplifies and distorts a voltage signal from your guitar. Or a voltage signal from the pedal before it.

Take it from somebody who's witnessed £28,000 worth of hi-fi being written off by a gormless twonk who thought running a six-stage linear loop pre into his 1962 split centre valve pre would be "interesting." And if you're still hung up on voltage, know that that can't have been pushing more than about 5.5V.

And if you still don't understand it, just re-read this post again, because I'm literally only going to reply with "re-read my last post" anyway.


Take it from someone who designs op amps for a living, this is not how electronics work. You are wrong. You may have too high an opinion of yourself to admit it, but you are full of shit.


Right, OP, apologies again. Back to our regularly scheduled programming (i.e. your questions).


Right, stop pretending to have a knowledge base that you clearly don't, and we won't have to correct you, and threads won't get derailed. I advise that you limit your statements on this board to things you actually know are correct.
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#19
Quote by FrooFender
You see, I like the overdrive channel on my amp but I just want even more distortion!!! Could some sort of booster increase the distortion or do they not work like that?


More often than not, it's the design of the amp that's going to limit what you get out of it.

Wander over to the Wampler Pedal site and have a look at some of the videos there. You'll probably find that one of their pedals will do exactly what you want it to.

Sometimes simply getting "more distortion" isn't what you really want. Often there's a lot more to it.
#20
You've got a tech who builds tube amps and an engineer who designs op-amps both telling you you're wrong, Flibble. You cannot break a 12AX7 with the output of a battery powered op-amp. End of story. Give it up.
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Last edited by Cathbard at Apr 5, 2014,
#21
Quote by FrooFender
So ehhhh, if I may ask... Is there any way I can get more gain with pedals?


Get a Tube Screamer or variant and boost your amp with it.
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#22
Quote by FrooFender
So ehhhh, if I may ask... Is there any way I can get more gain with pedals?


Of course. That's what pedals do. Go grab an overdrive pedal and throw it in front of your amp.
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#23
Quote by FrooFender
See, I usually play the clean channel and then kick the Turbo on when I want a lead sound.


That is exactly what you aren't supposed to do.

Try "crunching" the amp. Dirty channel, gain at about noon, then kick on the distortion pedal with the volume maxed and little distortion, midway on the tone. It might also be worth it to get a simple 2 channel footswitch for your amp if you can.
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#24
Quote by FrooFender
So ehhhh, if I may ask... Is there any way I can get more gain with pedals?

Yes, using them as a boost in front of the amp. Volume max, gain min on the pedal. You can add in a touch of gain on the pedal if you still don't get quite enough
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#25
So at the risk of getting fragged by the random sh*tstorm of techie flack...

You might consider, in the midst of deciding between pedals and simply turning your amp up as loud as it can go with a chain of boost pedals hammering its front end (and by the way, my first "boost pedal" was a Bogen PA amp stuffed between the guitar and the amp input, dialed fairly low, so I have NO idea what that did to anything, but it produced lovely distortion)...looking at a different preamp.

Most guitar amp heads are divided into two parts -- a preamp section and a power section. Usually there's an FX loop that will allow you to slide something into the division between them, and if you have a spare preamp sitting around, you can run it into the "fx return" portion of that loop and ignore the controls on the guitar preamp and run something else.

A lot of the old, used rack-mount preamps (designed to feed a straight power amp) can be very interesting in this role. I have, for example, a Mesa Triaxis (which essentially offered most of the sounds of the older Mesa amps in a fully tube-powered preamp) and a Carvin Quad-X. This latter piece can be had for around $350 used (and usually comes with a largish foot pedal), which sounds like a lot...at first. But there are *four* separate channels with four separate levels of gain, with each channel adding progressively more 12ax7 gain. There are NINE of those tubes in this thing, with up to 11 gain stages available. Active controls, built-in boost (along with a meter to tell you when you should use it), bass cloaking, noise gate, active assignable five-band eq, very nice spring reverb, MIDI controls, the whole shot, plus SIX separate FX loops. Twenty years ago this was a $600 piece on a direct from the factory basis. No idea what it would cost to duplicate today. A bit of a bitch to retube, but if gain is your thing, this is creamy distortion served up in bowlfuls. And the price of admission on these is akin to a couple of decent pedals.
Last edited by dspellman at Apr 5, 2014,
#26
Quote by MrFlibble
Sigh. Apologies to the OP, because this has now become an absolute farce and irrelevant to their question, but apparently some people can't understand basic English.

And if you still don't understand it, just re-read this post again, because I'm literally only going to reply with "re-read my last post"


Question: are you high?

Because what you wrote has no connection to reality.
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#27
Quote by MrFlibble
Sigh. Apologies to the OP, because this has now become an absolute farce and irrelevant to their question, but apparently some people can't understand basic English.

I will repeat this again: voltage is not the issue. At all. If you give voltage a second thought, you're already way off-track. You're imagining the problem I am talking about is a different problem to the one I am talking about. You might as well be saying that stacking multiple boosts isn't a problem because your guitar is painted red. You're talking about a completely irrelevant aspect. Yes, I know that dB is often measured as a relative unit to a base voltage, but as anybody with half a working brain knows, you can have two subjects giving the same voltage but different dB readings and dB is not used to measure voltage only. So, one last time, stop talking about voltage. It is not the issue.

Running a louder subject—remember, we're talking decibels, not voltage—causes saturation and clipping, yes? We're all agreed on that? Good. Most valves can clip from higher output guitar signal alone, something like active pickups, for instance. Those tend to give you an unamplified volume of about -16db. That's enough for a valve to run short of headroom, for lack of a better term, and signal clipping begins.
Now, there is a certain point, different for any given valve, at which it's being driven so hard we can say that the entire signal is being wholly clipped. This is usually in the area of +55dB to +85dB. Of course, other components along the signal chain may also max out; your typical stompbox pedal starts clipping with a +4dB signal, let alone +55dB or more. But that's another issue.
Now, what do you think happens if you ramp the volume up even further? You're already at maximum saturation (and possibly ear-bursting sound pressure). That valve isn't going to last terribly long. A valve which should last a few years will be chewed through in a matter of months, possibly even just weeks.

Think of it this way: you don't point a camera at the sun and shoot a long exposure because you burn out the chip. There's enough light to make the picture entirely white... and then there's so much light the chip just gives up the ghost. It's exactly the same with a pre amp valve and volume. If you give the amp the equivalent of the sun, like stacking eight boosts in front of it, each set to give you a signal +15dB louder than the one before, you'll end up giving it about twice the signal it takes just to make the signal wholly clip. Do it once and you'll just get a nasty wall of inaudible noise. Run it like that often and that valve's not going to be around for long.

A single boost is usually set to give you between +10dB and +25dB. That, realistically, just brings your instrument level up to line level, sometimes not even that far. It'll cause more saturation and clipping, but not cause any damage whatsoever. You could stack a second boost and now you're about a third of the way to entirely clipping. So, you see, we are talking about absolutely ludicrous extremes. Nobody—at least, nobody with any sense—is going to take eight EQ pedals, put them all in a row and set each one to max out every band and play like that all the time. But it is entirely possible.


Take it from somebody who's witnessed £28,000 worth of hi-fi being written off by a gormless twonk who thought running a six-stage linear loop pre into his 1962 split centre valve pre would be "interesting." And if you're still hung up on voltage, know that that can't have been pushing more than about 5.5V.

And if you still don't understand it, just re-read this post again, because I'm literally only going to reply with "re-read my last post" anyway.


Right, OP, apologies again. Back to our regularly scheduled programming (i.e. your questions).


Just ****ing stop. You know absolutely nothing. You realize that dB is a measurement of a ratio, right? It's used as an alternative measurement of voltage gain (a unitless metric). It is not an absolute value you can just throw out. You are literally so ignorant on this subject that you can't even recognize your own ignorance.

The three components of an AC signal are magnitude, frequency and phase. The magnitude (voltage) is the only thing that matters in this case. The magnitude is limited to the voltage of the power supply, and can not physically swing past its extremities. It doesn't matter how many you cascade when the output is limited to 9Vpk-pk in an ideal rail to rail op amp. All you do is make the output closer and closer to an ideal square wave.
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I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
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