#1
When I am working through my method book and practising some tunes, I find some days practise goes really well but immediately the next day I wont be able to play the tune correctly, cannot make the chord changes smoothly and sounds like crap. I just wonder if it's because I try to play too fast because I have this tendency to trying to achieve everything too fast too soon when it comes to learning guitar.
Cheers!
Last edited by sundar334 at Apr 5, 2014,
#2
I can almost guarantee you that's the case.

I used to have the same problem. When i was practicing i would often push the tempo or speed up without thinking about it. And that was a very bad habit to have when i was studying more advanced pieces. You need to practice slowly at a tempo were you can play relaxed and accurately, at a tempo were you don't make mistakes. You need to build that muscle memory.

The metronome is the obvious solution here, setting it to a tempo that is lower than normal and practice there. Really getting into the habit of playing slowly. I will admit, i don't personally play with a metronome anymore. But that's cause i did it so much before that i don't have that tendency to increase the tempo when practicing, and i always practice with the recording later on to make sure i can play stuff properly at a set tempo.

But yeah, bring the tempo down. It's MUCH BETTER to make sure that everything you play is perfect, that you DO NOT make mistakes, than that you are playing faster.

Hope that was helpful.
Best Regards,
Sickz
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
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#3
Quote by Sickz
I can almost guarantee you that's the case.

I used to have the same problem. When i was practicing i would often push the tempo or speed up without thinking about it. And that was a very bad habit to have when i was studying more advanced pieces. You need to practice slowly at a tempo were you can play relaxed and accurately, at a tempo were you don't make mistakes. You need to build that muscle memory.

The metronome is the obvious solution here, setting it to a tempo that is lower than normal and practice there. Really getting into the habit of playing slowly. I will admit, i don't personally play with a metronome anymore. But that's cause i did it so much before that i don't have that tendency to increase the tempo when practicing, and i always practice with the recording later on to make sure i can play stuff properly at a set tempo.

But yeah, bring the tempo down. It's MUCH BETTER to make sure that everything you play is perfect, that you DO NOT make mistakes, than that you are playing faster.

Hope that was helpful.
Best Regards,
Sickz
Thanks for the tips. I do in fact practise with a metronome, it's jus that in my quest to learn everything quick and be able to play fast quick i sometimes just can't bring myself to practise at slower speeds.
#4
daily ups and downs are entirely normal. If something is more challenging one day than the next, just slow it down and focus on the rough spots. Try to gauge your overall improvement in weeks and months, rather than day to day.
#5
Quote by sundar334
it's jus that in my quest to learn everything quick and be able to play fast quick i sometimes just can't bring myself to practise at slower speeds.



im currently learning a malmsteen song currently as a start to my "shredding days"... and yeah.. the original track is at 140bpm... started off practicing it at x0.25 speed (35bpm) at first...that was about 3-4 weeks ago... now i've managed to get it up to 100bpm... and the main problem i face is that one day i can nail even 105... and sometimes i can barely make 95.....

there's few things i've noticed in my quest for speed though...

1) the days i actually BUILD UP the speed.... that is... start at around 80bpm, and slowly raise it up to 100 after a few runs, im able to perform much better... coz basically my fingers are warmed up enough... so the point here being warm up more... maybe warm up for like 30 mins before the actual practice..

2) relating to the first point theres a petrucci dvd.. forgot the name... in which he says... when building speed... say if you can do play 90 bpm... the jump from 90 - 91 bpm isnt actually a 1bpm change... its actually a 91 bpm change... as in u have to go back down to 0 and start from there and build up back to 91 ... if u get what im saying... i'll try find a vid for it.. coz he explained it better...

oh and also, try not to get frustrated with the slow speeds... i know i do... patience is the key...

anyways yeah... good luck with the practice stuff...
#6
Some days you just don't feel really good about your playing, it's normal. If it goes on for a while you might consider even taking a day or two off. That can help with getting over challenges believe it or not.
#7
Quote by cdgraves
daily ups and downs are entirely normal.


yeah, some days you're just tired or whatever. i know if i'm tired i play far worse

also check the length of your fingernails (no, really). I find it difficult to play when my nails get slightly too long.

what sickz is saying is worth looking into too, of course.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#8
Quote by The SoundGuy
im currently learning a malmsteen song currently as a start to my "shredding days"... and yeah.. the original track is at 140bpm... started off practicing it at x0.25 speed (35bpm) at first...that was about 3-4 weeks ago... now i've managed to get it up to 100bpm... and the main problem i face is that one day i can nail even 105... and sometimes i can barely make 95.....

there's few things i've noticed in my quest for speed though...

1) the days i actually BUILD UP the speed.... that is... start at around 80bpm, and slowly raise it up to 100 after a few runs, im able to perform much better... coz basically my fingers are warmed up enough... so the point here being warm up more... maybe warm up for like 30 mins before the actual practice..

2) relating to the first point theres a petrucci dvd.. forgot the name... in which he says... when building speed... say if you can do play 90 bpm... the jump from 90 - 91 bpm isnt actually a 1bpm change... its actually a 91 bpm change... as in u have to go back down to 0 and start from there and build up back to 91 ... if u get what im saying... i'll try find a vid for it.. coz he explained it better...

oh and also, try not to get frustrated with the slow speeds... i know i do... patience is the key...

anyways yeah... good luck with the practice stuff...
could it be Rock Discipline that you are alluding to?
#10
Quote by Dave_Mc
yeah, some days you're just tired or whatever. i know if i'm tired i play far worse

also check the length of your fingernails (no, really). I find it difficult to play when my nails get slightly too long.

what sickz is saying is worth looking into too, of course.

I've have the good habit of chewing on my nails a lot so they hardly get outta control lol. It's been about a year since I started learning and i'm 23 so it's just that I wanna form a band so bad and compose facemelting solos i try to learn things within an unreasonable time and from the earlier replies i guess that's my main problem . so I jus gotta get it inside my head that slow is good
#12
Quote by sundar334
I've have the good habit of chewing on my nails a lot so they hardly get outta control lol. It's been about a year since I started learning and i'm 23 so it's just that I wanna form a band so bad and compose facemelting solos i try to learn things within an unreasonable time and from the earlier replies i guess that's my main problem . so I jus gotta get it inside my head that slow is good


haha no worries

guitar is what made me stop biting my nails as i was always hurting my fingers
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#13
I play sloppy guitar sometimes trying to play too fast.

It is easy to get sloppy because it seems funner the faster you play.
#14
Quote by sundar334
so I jus gotta get it inside my head that slow is good


That's the ticket. If you're wanting to build your speed up, the main thing to bear in mind is that practicing playing fast is not what builds your speed. Being able to play fast is having technique that is good enough that it doesn't fall apart when you speed up. So practicing at any speed where you are able to maintain good technique is going strengthen that technique and help you play fast. That said, I'm not saying play only slow either. That can be counter-productive, and lead to you developing a technique that is good for playing slow but not good for playing fast. I'd recommend taking what you're working on, and practicing it at several tempos, ranging from very slow, to fast enough that you're just beginning to labor a bit (but it isn't falling apart or sounding crappy). The other thing I've found extremely effective is increasing the tempo in a ladder pattern, e.g. 80-90-85-95-90-etc.. Slowing down a little after every upward increment really helps you maintain the good technique as you speed up. The only other thing I have to add about building up speed is to really be strict with yourself about not increasing the tempo if you're not able to perform it clean at the current tempo. You've got to be willing to call BS on yourself if you catch yourself letting little things slide because you're too eager to move to the next tempo.

Back to the original question. There are a lot of things that contribute to crappy/good days on the guitar. For example, did you get a good night's sleep? How was your day? If you are carrying around stress in your body from a hard day, that's going to affect your playing. Your mental state is big. If you're feeling relaxed, then you're going to be able to concentrate a lot better than if you're feeling stressed and jittery. What you play on the guitar for your warm up and how you approach it makes a difference. As well as getting blood flowing to your muscles and tendons, that warm up is where mentally you let the days stresses out of you and get into guitar mode.
#15
Quote by se012101
That's the ticket. If you're wanting to build your speed up, the main thing to bear in mind is that practicing playing fast is not what builds your speed. Being able to play fast is having technique that is good enough that it doesn't fall apart when you speed up. So practicing at any speed where you are able to maintain good technique is going strengthen that technique and help you play fast. That said, I'm not saying play only slow either. That can be counter-productive, and lead to you developing a technique that is good for playing slow but not good for playing fast. I'd recommend taking what you're working on, and practicing it at several tempos, ranging from very slow, to fast enough that you're just beginning to labor a bit (but it isn't falling apart or sounding crappy). The other thing I've found extremely effective is increasing the tempo in a ladder pattern, e.g. 80-90-85-95-90-etc.. Slowing down a little after every upward increment really helps you maintain the good technique as you speed up. The only other thing I have to add about building up speed is to really be strict with yourself about not increasing the tempo if you're not able to perform it clean at the current tempo. You've got to be willing to call BS on yourself if you catch yourself letting little things slide because you're too eager to move to the next tempo.

Back to the original question. There are a lot of things that contribute to crappy/good days on the guitar. For example, did you get a good night's sleep? How was your day? If you are carrying around stress in your body from a hard day, that's going to affect your playing. Your mental state is big. If you're feeling relaxed, then you're going to be able to concentrate a lot better than if you're feeling stressed and jittery. What you play on the guitar for your warm up and how you approach it makes a difference. As well as getting blood flowing to your muscles and tendons, that warm up is where mentally you let the days stresses out of you and get into guitar mode.

Today I swallowed my ego and practise at really slow speeds and my fingers went to the right places and I ended up being less frustrated!
#16
Quote by Jyrgen
Some days you just don't feel really good about your playing, it's normal. If it goes on for a while you might consider even taking a day or two off. That can help with getting over challenges believe it or not.

Yes I have found that sometimes taking a day off really helps.