#1
Greetings to all! Newbie here (Well, at this forum). Glad I found this place.

Anyone know a great article/video to learn and read standard notation with the treble clef? All I know are the notes and in the staves and on the ledger lines, as well as the notes on the fretboard. I have no idea how to translate them both to where I can read it and simply play it. I also don't know the other little details (What each symbol represents). I've been playing for a year, and I think it's time to read something other than tabs and chords and move on up to scales.

PS: I checked the written tutorial on Ultimate Guitar explaining all this, but I didn't find it useful. I need more visuals to learn.

Cheers!
#2
I think it is wise to purchase a theory book. On the moment I am busy studying "The AB guide to music theory" It starts of with all the notations. So I guess you shoulf get that book.
#3
Quote by liampje
I think it is wise to purchase a theory book. On the moment I am busy studying "The AB guide to music theory" It starts of with all the notations. So I guess you shoulf get that book.


Well I have a "Music theory for dummies" book that I purchased around a year ago and it isn't really helping. It's not really retaining in my memory. I've searched up countless videos on youtube but either they don't make sense because they rush it or just cover the basic letters on the staff (EFGABCDEF).
#4
The most important part of processing new theory is either practice or having a very good memory.
The AB guide covers all the information you woulf need.
#5
Quote by liampje
The most important part of processing new theory is either practice or having a very good memory.
The AB guide covers all the information you woulf need.


Is it great for people like me that are just getting started? I see that there's a 'part one' book. How many books are there to it?
#6
There are 2 parts. I got the series recommemded from someone in this forum. It gives a basic grid on theory (talking about both parts). The most important parts of theory are covered. And it is easy to follow although the book is rarely a bit hard to understand. But then again, that's what this forum is for I suppose...
#7
If you know the notes on the staff and the notes on the fretboard (really know them, like don't have to think), then it comes down to figuring out where the easiest place to play it is, and just doing it quickly. I think this is one of those things that just comes down to experience, so the only thing I see to do is practice. Honestly, I think you're doing pretty fucking good if you've only been playing for a year and you have the whole fretboard memorized and know standard notation. I wish I'd learned standard notation right off the bat like that.

edit:

If you want a good source for learning theory stuff you should check out www.musictheory.net it's not guitar specific, but it's really all the same thing.
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at Apr 6, 2014,
#8
Quote by The4thHorsemen
If you know the notes on the staff and the notes on the fretboard (really know them, like don't have to think), then it comes down to figuring out where the easiest place to play it is, and just doing it quickly. I think this is one of those things that just comes down to experience, so the only thing I see to do is practice. Honestly, I think you're doing pretty fucking good if you've only been playing for a year and you have the whole fretboard memorized and know standard notation. I wish I'd learned standard notation right off the bat like that.

edit:

If you want a good source for learning theory stuff you should check out www.musictheory.net it's not guitar specific, but it's really all the same thing.


Amazing? Really? I mean, yes, I can play any note on the fretboard but I don't know how to read the standard notation well to where I can play it instantly. Not much of an accomplishment if you ask me.
#9
"Music reading for guitar: the complete method" by David Oakes is a good place to start with. It walks you through from the very beginning. However, it only deals in single note lines, no chords or anything like that. I still think it's a great lace to start for beginners, it really instills the notes on the staff as well as dynamics etc. and the notes on the guitar neck into your brain.

YOu can get it off amazon for about 10 dollars.
#10
^ decent book
you may want to try the Hal Leonard Guitar method books if you have enough discipline to go through that, this is when a teacher is useful. never had the discipline to learn to sight read when i was starting because i wanted to learn covers and play metal
i had to learn to sight read by force (for an audition) much later

tl;dr LEARN TO SIGHT READ NOW
#11
Quote by ProjectNemesis
Amazing? Really? I mean, yes, I can play any note on the fretboard but I don't know how to read the standard notation well to where I can play it instantly. Not much of an accomplishment if you ask me.

Yeah, well you just need to practice. It takes time to learn this kind of things. Just start reading sheet music and playing. Start with simple pieces. You can't expect yourself to be able to sight read right away when you have never even practiced sight reading. I can name all notes on my fretboard (if you give me enough time - OK it takes a couple of seconds) and I know where all notes are on the staff but I can't really sight read (on guitar) because I have never practiced it. I can sight read on trumpet but that's because I have always read notation on trumpet. Knowing it in theory is different than knowing it in practice. You need to know it so well that you don't need to think about it at all. That's when you can sight read well. Nobody will learn to sight read in a day.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#12
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Yeah, well you just need to practice. It takes time to learn this kind of things. Just start reading sheet music and playing. Start with simple pieces. You can't expect yourself to be able to sight read right away when you have never even practiced sight reading. I can name all notes on my fretboard (if you give me enough time - OK it takes a couple of seconds) and I know where all notes are on the staff but I can't really sight read (on guitar) because I have never practiced it. I can sight read on trumpet but that's because I have always read notation on trumpet. Knowing it in theory is different than knowing it in practice. You need to know it so well that you don't need to think about it at all. That's when you can sight read well. Nobody will learn to sight read in a day.


Definitely right.

Quote by liampje
There are 2 parts. I got the series recommemded from someone in this forum. It gives a basic grid on theory (talking about both parts). The most important parts of theory are covered. And it is easy to follow although the book is rarely a bit hard to understand. But then again, that's what this forum is for I suppose...


Does the book give you great practice exercises (sight reading, etc)?
#13
Quote by ProjectNemesis

Does the book give you great practice exercises (sight reading, etc)?


No, in the original post you asked on how to read things on the staff. You didn't ask on how to sight read. If you want to learn how to sight read, there are many books specially written for that. I can't recommend you one. Because I don't know how to sight read. But I can read what's happening.

Actually, I'm getting kind of interested in learning how to sight read lately, I might pick up some book as well.
#14
Quote by liampje
No, in the original post you asked on how to read things on the staff. You didn't ask on how to sight read. If you want to learn how to sight read, there are many books specially written for that. I can't recommend you one. Because I don't know how to sight read. But I can read what's happening.

Actually, I'm getting kind of interested in learning how to sight read lately, I might pick up some book as well.


Whoops, forgot to mention that I suck at sight reading. But yes, I need to be able to recognize notes and symbols on the staff more clearly and sight read on the spot. I'll definitely check that book out that you posted.

Btw, out of curiosity, is it me or do more than half of the guitar players you encounter these days only know how to read tabs and chord diagrams, and have no clue what a semi breve is?
Last edited by ProjectNemesis at Apr 7, 2014,
#16
Quote by ProjectNemesis
Whoops, forgot to mention that I suck at sight reading. But yes, I need to be able to recognize notes and symbols on the staff more clearly and sight read on the spot. I'll definitely check that book out that you posted.

Btw, out of curiosity, is it me or do more than half of the guitar players you encounter these days only know how to read tabs and chord diagrams, and have no clue what a semi breve is?

Today I would say more guitarists know how to read music than let's say 50 years ago. It depends on if you are self taught and it also depends on your teacher. If you are a jazz guitarist, you will most likely be able to read sheet music.

But yeah, most guitarists are bedroom guitar heroes (and by bedroom guitar heroes I mean people who can play some riffs and chords and maybe a couple of solos but nothing more complicated than that).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115