#1
Hey all,

Wasn't sure where to put it, so I just put it here.

This summer, I'm thinking of picking up a guitar kit and building one. The one I have in mind is the Saga LJ-10 Les Paul Junior kit.

I have a couple of questions though:


1. Is it worth buying for a beginning build?
I don't expect a real Gibson, just something that plays and feels like how much I paid for it.

2. Is it worth upgrading the hardware?
I heard that the bridges are crazy high, and apart from shimming the neck, I'm not sure what else to do.

3. Will I need anything other than a screwdriver, finishing supplies and sandpaper?
It says that the electronics are "clip-on" and I only need a screwdriver. Will I need a drill, saw etc for the neck/headstock?

4. How can I finish the guitar?
I plan to get a solid finish, perhaps something close to TV Yellow like the LPJ that Green Day uses. I looked at a build online and they briefly said that they used acrylic lacquer (rustoleum) and clear coated it with crystal clear rustoleum, then let it cure for 72 hours. Is that okay, will I need to do any sanding or anything first? They said that they used this method due to the wood being sealed, so I imagine I should just do this.


5. Can someone give me an exact step by step guide to finish this guitar?

For example:

1. spray xxx paint on
2. sand it down with xxx grit paper
3. spray xxx clear coat
4. sand down to xxx grit
5. wait xxx hours

etc.


I hope someone can answer any of these questions.

Thanks!
#2
You might want to look in the gear customization section on hear. Very knowledgeable people there. But in short, I have heard, this is not from experience, that saga kits are not very good. In most kits, save Carvin, you'll probably need to replace all of the accessories, e.g. Bridge, pups, tuners, pots, jack, possibly even nut. I used byoguitar as a kit and going into it knew that I was going to replace everything, luckily I had things laying around to use. Be prepared to do fret work most of these guitars have the frets "leveled?", meaning you'll still have to work on it. They do provide you with a solid platform for gaining experience if you don't have the tools or knowledge to go from a blank piece of wood. I would hit up the guys in the gear modding section, they might be able to link you to another kit that would be of better value to you.
Gibson LP traditional and DC standard, PRS S2 Custom 24, MIA Standard Strat, Charvel So Cal Pro Mod, Schecter Banshee 7
EVH 5153, Mesa DR Tremoverb combo 2-2x12's
Line 6 M13
#3
Quote by bobafettacheese
You might want to look in the gear customization section on hear. Very knowledgeable people there. But in short, I have heard, this is not from experience, that saga kits are not very good. In most kits, save Carvin, you'll probably need to replace all of the accessories, e.g. Bridge, pups, tuners, pots, jack, possibly even nut. I used byoguitar as a kit and going into it knew that I was going to replace everything, luckily I had things laying around to use. Be prepared to do fret work most of these guitars have the frets "leveled?", meaning you'll still have to work on it. They do provide you with a solid platform for gaining experience if you don't have the tools or knowledge to go from a blank piece of wood. I would hit up the guys in the gear modding section, they might be able to link you to another kit that would be of better value to you.



Thanks for that! I will definitely talk to someone at my guitar store about leveling the frets, I have no idea what that even is. I just want to build something to a. gain experience and to b. produce something that is worthy of just jamming on, no gigging unless i get it professionally set up and upgraded.

But the main reason I wanted a Saga kit was price. At less than 200 dollars it does seem quite worth it.

Still, I'll keep this up and see what some other people say. Thanks for getting me started though
#4
Quote by harmeet45


But the main reason I wanted a Saga kit was price. At less than 200 dollars it does seem quite worth it.


It seems worth it at first, but once you're into it, you're likely to find it's simply a boat anchor, and you'll never be able to sell it for what you've got into it. I looked at several of the kits on the market, and while there are certainly success stories, there are far more instances where the guitar was never completed, or where the expense didn't come close to matching what you could have purchased completed. If you're an accomplished DIY-er (you're not), and if you really understand guitars (you don't), you have a reasonable chance at this. Otherwise, I'd take another close look at the Rondo Music site, etc., and see what you can actually play for your $200 kit cost.
#5
Hi, I've just finished a kit guitar from the stallah guitar range. And have to admit it was very good quality. I built a hollow body jazz style guitar & I was very happy with the results. The beauty is you can finish them in any style you choose, even the headstock is flat. So it allows you to shape it anyway you like. Here's a link to where I bought my guitar kit, it's from a company in Dublin Ireland. But they also sell these kits in the UK, http://guitar-warehouse.com/
Here's the UK links http://www.guitar-warehouse.com/ and here's the kit I bought
http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2057180145
#6
It is worth thinking about the motives for building a kit, as implied by dspellman. IMO, those of us that spend a lot of time mucking about with guitars do it mostly because it is a hobby in its own right, like building model aeroplanes. - It isn't a cheap option when you take into account the cost of tools, failures and your time.

IMO, you a better off buying a cheap guitar and upgrading all the hardware as necessary if you want to have a go at guitar tinkering. I just fixed up a Peavey Raptor that I got for Oz$75 (it would have been $50 in the US) in the local hock shop. Total cost additional cost was about $250, $150 of which was on a Lollar Chicago pickup - but I already had the pickup from another project.

FWIW, if I was doing a parts build, it would be to make a dream guitar, not as a cheap option. - Warmoth neck and body, good hardware.
Last edited by Tony Done at Apr 15, 2014,