#1
Greetings fellow shredders,

I have always wanted an SG. I've been playing an Ovation UKII solid-body electric guitar for 27 years, but having run into some money, I decided to buy an SG. I have always wanted one because I have always felt I could really shred on those necks. I went with a 2013 Standard (in classic white). The creamy tones that come through those pick-ups, along with the sweet sustain and action of the neck, were what sold me. The neck fits my hand better than any other.

However...

I play my guitar(s) hard. I bend lots. I bend hard. I bend all over the neck. For the life of me, this beautiful sounding new guitar will not stay in tune for me. I thought perhaps it was the strings. So I broke them in with a few hours of cranking (and tuning). After I play a song with my band, my stage tuner shows that I am out (almost all of my strings, after each song). I've done some research and wonder if this could be an SG thing (the glue-on neck, great signature sustain coming, in part, from the slightly sloppy neck, etc.). When I put pressure on it even a little, it does the tremelo-sounding thing. I cannot see myself going on stage and having to tune between every song. My ovation takes a beating and stays in tune for each set or more. I love, love, love the feel and tone of this SG. However....

Is it possible, do you people think, if this is caused primarily by my style of playing... that maybe I simply need a guitar with a stiffer neck?

Is this characteristic of SG's in general?

Could it be a defect of some sort? Is there a relatively inexpensive fix for what I perceive to be an overly mushy neck?

Thanks in advance!
Steve
#2
There is nothing wrong with the neck. Although SG's do tend to not have a substantial neck heel because of their neck joint. I've seen some Ibanez guitars to this as well, including prestiges.

It's more a matter of adjusting how you hold the guitar. If the guitar keeps going out of tune, lubricate the nut slots and you'll probably be fine.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
#3
I picked one up that did that, would go our of tune just playing it. The neck was as weak as hell. I wanted to like it but after the hours of setup I did to it to have the right action(the neck was set in too low) I decided to dump it.

I will never buy a Gibson or Epiphone ever after that one. They just seem too much all over the board in QC to ever spend the money they want for their product.
What the hell!!!
#4
Honestly you could fret out the strings by pulling back on the neck, let go and it would be in tune, and the neck relief was good. While playing it would go sharp or flat. No way to fix that junk. I can only assume TS got a bunk one like I did.

Dump it. Other than a minimal setup you should have no kind of issues like that with a new guitar, unless it is a Starcaster or something like that.
What the hell!!!
#6
Get your nut properly cut. Gibsons usually have the tuning issue which can be easily fixed doing this. I've always found that the slots are quite thin and cause a few strings to "stick and ping". If you have the tools you can do it yourself in a few minutes without spending a dime.

I have the exact guitar you have in the exact color! It stays in tune for days and I play it at least a few hours a day.

ITS THE NUT! 99% of tuning issues are because of the nut.
Last edited by cheesefries at Apr 8, 2014,
#7
Played an SG standard this past week in my shop with the intent of buying it if it sounded and played well. It was a total POS. The other Gibsons I played were not much better, even a 60's Tribute LP that I really wanted to buy. I have lost what little faith in Gibson that I had.
Ibanez SR1200E
#8
I had an SG STD in black in '06 and it was a beauty,Hardly ever went out,Maybe its just the newer ones,My LPJ that i got recently has been having issues staying in.
#9
Quote by pachap
Played an SG standard this past week in my shop with the intent of buying it if it sounded and played well. It was a total POS. The other Gibsons I played were not much better, even a 60's Tribute LP that I really wanted to buy. I have lost what little faith in Gibson that I had.

Maybe you should judge a guitar company not by playing a couple of their guitars and saying that the entire company sucks, but rather judge the guitar on an individual basis? No?
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
#10
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Maybe you should judge a guitar company not by playing a couple of their guitars and saying that the entire company sucks, but rather judge the guitar on an individual basis? No?


I'm not saying the entire company sucks. But out of 6 guitars across different price points at least one should be playable and have good fit and finish. Let me elaborate more: I've lost faith in Gibson to consistently make good guitars to roll the dice on purchasing one.
Ibanez SR1200E
#11
I like Gibson and have never owned a bad one, but I have played some bad ones. But I have played "bad" guitars from almost every maker except PRS and EBMM, they are always top notch
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#12
As a few people have already said, it's a problem with the nut, most likely.

All guitar necks have a little bit of flex in them, because wood bends. that's the reason why truss rods exist. SGs are generally a bit more flexible than most other guitars because of their design but it's nothing to worry about.

^I have played a EBMM guitar I thought was mediocre, but admittedly, it was one that had been cut up to show the weight relief/chambering of that particular model and wasn't really meant to be played
Rig Winter 2017:

Fender Jazzmaster/Yamaha SG1000
Boss TU-3, DS-2, CS-3, EHX small stone, Danelectro delay
Laney VC30-112 with G12H30 speaker, or Session Rockette 30 for smaller gigs
Elixir Nanoweb 11-49 strings, Dunlop Jazz III XL picks
Shure SM57 mic in front of the amp
#13
Gibson's have always been "Meh" for me. I played a Les Paul Supreme once that was absolutely stunning, but everything else for me has never been super stellar and was definitely not worth getting at the price they were asking. I've always liked the idea of having a nice Les Paul, but I can't get behind the idea of paying 2-3k dollars for something that doesn't feel that way. I've been playing my Carvin for so long that it just seems criminal to spend that amount of money on a guitar and it not play any better. That's my 2 cents.
Gear:
1987 Charvel Model II
2010 Carvin ST300C
1990 Charvette 100
1991 Ibanez RG560M
2006 Fender Mexi Strat
Jackson/Charvel Star W/ Custom Graphics.
Ovation CP 247 Acoustic
Line 6 POD HD Pro X
Pro Tools 9

Tutorial: Studio Quality Programmed Drum Sounds
#14
Quote by pachap
I'm not saying the entire company sucks.

What you said was synonymous with that assertion.
But out of 6 guitars across different price points at least one should be playable and have good fit and finish. Let me elaborate more: I've lost faith in Gibson to consistently make good guitars to roll the dice on purchasing one.

I'll say it again. Maybe you should judge a guitar company not by playing a couple of their guitars and saying that the entire company sucks, but rather judge each guitar on an individual basis? No?

Whether a particular Gibson is a great guitar is not dependent on how many other Gibsons you've played in the past.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Apr 10, 2014,
#15
Any problem like a nut should never happen. They should know about that stuff in the factory obviously. I'm not a fan of the bridges either.

Even if you don't use it, a FR has a much better designed saddle, for me, locking nuts should be the norm on any guitar IMO, even if it's not a trem, fine tune them like a FR, they stay in tune forever and never break strings.
#16
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
What you said was synonymous with that assertion.

I'll say it again. Maybe you should judge a guitar company not by playing a couple of their guitars and saying that the entire company sucks, but rather judge each guitar on an individual basis? No?

Whether a particular Gibson is a great guitar is not dependent on how many other Gibsons you've played in the past.


If you play 6 in a row all with issues, that is a problem, and it is enough for me not to roll the dice on one in the future.
Ibanez SR1200E
#17
Quote by pachap
If you play 6 in a row all with issues, that is a problem, and it is enough for me not to roll the dice on one in the future.

It's a pretty arbitrary way to pick out the right guitar, but go right ahead.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
#18
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
It's a pretty arbitrary way to pick out the right guitar, but go right ahead.


No it's not an arbitrary way.

You are coming across as being very defensive of Gibson here.

If they can't get a nut, frets, and finish issues correct on an SG Standard, why would I potentially spend thousands of dollars on a guitar that might have issues I can't see? So yeah, I am fine saying I am wary of Gibson based on my prior experience with them. I'm not going to waste my time on them any longer.

The 6 in question that I played were: 2013 SG Standard, 2013 50's Tribute, 2013 60's Tribute, 2014 SGJ, 2014 Melody Maker, 2014 LP Studio. The above guitars represent different price points and model years, and they all had issues that affected the playability. This is representative of a general problem. So evaluate each guitar individually if you want to, but I am not wasting my time any longer.

For what it is worth I went into the shop last Saturday night with a $3000 budget, possibly willing to spend more if I could find the right Les Paul. That's right, I went specifically to purchase a Les Paul. It was pretty sad experience.
Ibanez SR1200E
#19
Quote by cheesefries
Get your nut properly cut. Gibsons usually have the tuning issue which can be easily fixed doing this. I've always found that the slots are quite thin and cause a few strings to "stick and ping". If you have the tools you can do it yourself in a few minutes without spending a dime.

I have the exact guitar you have in the exact color! It stays in tune for days and I play it at least a few hours a day.

ITS THE NUT! 99% of tuning issues are because of the nut.


What tools do you need to do this? Can you direct me to where I should go to learn how to do it?

Of course I thought about Googling all this but it sounds like you have some valuable experience in the area.
#20
Just throwing my opinion in on this, I have always thought the Kluson tuners sucked, and I actually like Gibson. Might be worth considering, though the nut is top priority, do that first.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#21
Why must every thread where Gibson is mentioned a flame-war ensues? The point was established that the nut/tuners are probably the primary culprit. I think there are a couple videos either via stewmac or youtube that go over cutting an appropriate nut slot. I think that locking tuners might help, but if the nut is the issue, I doubt locking tuners will remedy that. Best of luck, I hope it gets sorted out.
Gibson LP traditional and DC standard, SG standard, MIA Standard Strat, Schecter Banshee 7(*for sale*)
EVH 5153, Orange TV50H 2-2x12's
Line 6 M13
#22
Quote by bobafettacheese
Why must every thread where Gibson is mentioned a flame-war ensues? The point was established that the nut/tuners are probably the primary culprit. I think there are a couple videos either via stewmac or youtube that go over cutting an appropriate nut slot. I think that locking tuners might help, but if the nut is the issue, I doubt locking tuners will remedy that. Best of luck, I hope it gets sorted out.



+1
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.