#1
Is there any techniques to being able to change quicker from open chords to barre chords.
I can play a barre chord cleanly just takes about 2 to 3 seconds to form it. Should I barre then form the shape or shape then barre. Is there any technique other than practice.


So far I can play A Am C cadd7 Dm F (I use the really easy One most the time for speed purposes).
#2
Well, practice will help.

Try to switch between a D chord and a F barre, as it is one of the trickiest switches. Or otherwise E to F barre. Try this a hundred times and you can switch easily between any chord and a barre.

Another learning technique is to focus on your fingertips. First concentrate on your index finger and only on this one. Form the chords and perform the switches - and always stay focused on this particular fingertip. Feel it, see it. Then go ahead and focus on your middle finger and so on. This way you really get a feeling for every chord and every position.
#3
Quote by BassBen93
Is there any techniques to being able to change quicker from open chords to barre chords. .....
Basically, your wrist joint is out of position when trying to change from open to barre positions.

When playing all open chords, the wrist is more behind the neck, and a bit towards the sound hole.

When playing a barre, you wrist needs to be more under the neck, and just a bit toward the top nut. As the poster above said the index finger is key, but you have to move your wrist into a position that enables you to straighten it out across the fret board first.

The second point is practice....., practice.....and MORE PRACTICE

I've played the guitar for close to 50 years, and did extensive chord drills in lessons.

BUT, I can't in any way, shape or form, quickly finger exotic chord shapes which I haven't used in years.....! I'm not a jazz guy, so my day to day playing consists of standard open, and barre chord forms. Those I can get to pretty quickly.

In the Who's "Tommy", there is a song, "I'm Free". In the verse, the chords are E (open), G (3rd fret Barre), to A, (5th fret barre), the next pass is F#, (2nd fret barre), A (5th fret barre) and B, (7th fret barre).

While these changes are basically, "locked finger shapes", they will help you to practice moving up the neck, and getting the barre on and locked quickly, especially if you try and keep pace with the recording. (And as with many other Pete Townshend songs, there's a lots of open chords with finger noodling as well).
#4
Slowly but surely getting there with it changing a little better now.

Is it bad that I like to use the F that's just high e 1st fret 1st fret B 2nd G 3rd D sometimes on slower and deeper songs I add the 3rd fret on A too but not often. I find it better for speed to play it that simply it sounds cleaner and better as I never miss it. Should I really be aiming to barre it will guitarists look down at me because I play it simply. I'm happy that I can still play it even as a small barre like that.

I've been writing some progressions out that use Bm so I'm getting there with the barres but just when it comes to F just easier to play it that way after an open chord.
Last edited by BassBen93 at Apr 10, 2014,
#5
Quote by BassBen93
...[ ]....Is it bad that I like to use the F that's just high e 1st fret 1st fret B 2nd G 3rd D sometimes on slower and deeper songs I add the 3rd fret on A too but not often. I find it better for speed to play it that simply it sounds cleaner and better as I never miss it. Should I really be aiming to barre it will guitarists look down at me because I play it simply. I'm happy that I can still play it even as a small barre like that....[ ].....
The barre across the 1st fret is the most difficult, (at least in the guitar's 1st octave). because of tis proximity to the top nut.

Oftentimes, the grooves in the top nut aren't filed deep enough. This makes the string angle too steep, and too much pressure is required to apply the barre.

I understand that you are just beginning, so take note, even with the grooves in the top nut AT the proper depth, this is still the most difficult barre to apply. This so you don't go filing out those grooves unnecessarily deep, and ruin the nut.

Just keep in mind that this problem can exist, and have someone knowledgeable look over your guitar, to determine if if is set up correctly.

So, a setup could possibly some of ease your pain, but it won't replace putting the effort in to gain the necessary hand strength.
#6
i had trouble with barre chords for years - enough that i all but quit playing guitar for a while as i was slow, it was frustrating, and i developed some pain when playing a lot of barre chords.

getting my guitars set up nice and low helped, and the rest was practice for two reasons - first, to strengthen your barring hang, fingers and wrist, and second, to get to really know the chords well so you can just snap to them. on some guitars, even with a setup, i use extra light strings, and that sped things up and the pain stopped.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#7
I'm getting there seeing a small improvement in speed and accuracy Just changing chords with one strum on each and getting faster
#8
i used to pick a bar(usually F...aim high) and an open chord and alternate between the 2 until i became proficient in changing between them. sometimes 1 strum and change, sometimes 4 strums and change. after a while, i'd pick another 2 chords.
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
#9
One thing that use to help me with chord changes, and still does is basically using a "guide finger." I think of this two ways, one if the two chords you are playing have a string and a finger in common, you use that finger to go to the fret without essentially lifting up your whole hand. It's hard to explain, but really helps. Another thing I do is say there are no "guide fingers" in the chord, what I will do is focus on one finger in particular, it can be any finger, I get that in the right place, then kind of imagine the rest of the shape around the finger. Eventually you'll get used to the change that you don't have to do that anymore. These are hard to explain, but very very useful.
Originally posted by arrrgg
When my grandpa comes over to visit, after his shower, he walks around naked to dry off
#10
Quote by Led man32
One thing that use to help me with chord changes, and still does is basically using a "guide finger." I think of this two ways, one if the two chords you are playing have a string and a finger in common, you use that finger to go to the fret without essentially lifting up your whole hand. It's hard to explain, but really helps. Another thing I do is say there are no "guide fingers" in the chord, what I will do is focus on one finger in particular, it can be any finger, I get that in the right place, then kind of imagine the rest of the shape around the finger. Eventually you'll get used to the change that you don't have to do that anymore. These are hard to explain, but very very useful.


This is what I do too, when there are no "guide fingers" and I'm not fast enough I practice getting the most awkward finger(or the one that's having the issue not doing what I want it to do) in place first and then shape around that.
#11
If changing a lot between open and barre, I've adjusted to play open chords with fingerings that suit the switch rather than how it's usually taught. I play open chords without index finger, i.e. E and A with 234 rather than 123. Like that you can easily slide into a barre. Finger 1 always available to do a quick barre and when playing straight chords without no add or sus etc, there's no need to have finger 1 involved
#12
I've been playing Barre chords further down the neck and with a capo on to do other songs it's almost up to speed and now I've gone back to fret 1 I can almost get it with no buzzing so happy to see such an improvement. My wrists hurt and my fingers want to bleed but it has been with it as I nearly am to speed with it.
#13
Yes there is another technique. Try learning the CAGED system. Moveable shapes up and down the frett board, way quicker than trying to move from open chords to E shaped barred F.

Justinguitar .com has a good tutorial on this subject. Cheers