#1
For me it's scales, scales, and even more scales. Sleep scales, meditate on scales, eat scales, shit scales; you get the point.

What does your daily guitar practice schedule look like?
#2
Pick a song, put on a backing track, and just play until my problems of the day are gone. Maybe learn a new one every now and again.
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#3
Alternate picking, alternate picking, multi finger tapping, string skipping (again, alternate picking), and the occasional sweep picking.
Gear:
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#4
Daily?
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Log off and play yer guitar!

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#5
It's not my job, so I don't regiment it.
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#6
Quote by Mephaphil
It's not my job, so I don't regiment it.


^ this guy gets it. I play when I want to and I play what I want to. Also this is the wrong sub-forum.
#7
when i feel like playing guitar i just play all the songs i know and if i feel like it i'll learn 1 or 2 new ones
#8
Quote by Mephaphil
It's not my job, so I don't regiment it.


This, but I do try adding a tint bit of structure.

Put on a cd on and playing along
Scales
Theory
Arpeggios
Learning a song
Riffage
Noodle
Repeat if possible.
Miss bits out and add bits as mood takes me

Playing is fun. Without fun there is no playing. Without playing there is no fun.
Last edited by -Ed- at Apr 11, 2014,
#9
Practising songs, practising songs and practising songs.

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#10
I learn whatever I feel like learning if I want to, and don't when I don't.
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I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#11
Whatever I want. Usually not structured practice, just playing for my own enjoyment. Although lately I've been getting back into proper practice a bit.

I do not have a routine that I go through when I play guitar. It's usually just sitting behind me on my bed and ill pick it up and just play it whenever I feel the need.

Although today I did take it out to the shed and play through an amp for ~4 hours. Started on a new song. It's a pretty mixed up "practice schedule".
#12
- warm up with my tremolo-picking friends, Amon Amarth
- compose, noodle, write, record
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#14
Quote by The SoundGuy
like this:



Right on.
Quote by Shredwizard445
Go ahead and spend your money, I don't care. It won't make you sound better.


Quote by Shredwizard445
Sure upgrading your gear will make you sound better.


#15
Usually looks something like this:
-techniques such as alt picking, economy picking, legato, tapping, bends, and vibrado
-rhythm/chord practice
-improvise a solo over a backing track
-learn a song, or part of it
-review songs I already know

Also, I try to learn a solo every week. Not necessarily note for note like the original, but close.
#16
Mostly it's trying to remember and recreate all the cool rhythms licks and riffs I came up with the night before and then didn't record or write down before I went to sleep.
#17
I am a married father of two kids, including a 2 year old boy who is currently terrorizing the family cat with a garden hoe. How in the hell did he smuggle the garden hoe inside the house?

Anyway, in between all that, a career, and writing a book, I don't have a lot of time for formal practice.

The playing I normally get in pretty simple. I just hang my guitar around my neck, sit on the couch, and practice. Mostly I just noodle around with blues scales, but I also try to learn new songs. Right now I have a window open with Tab Pro and I am learning Symphony of Destruction. Also polishing off Wherever I May Roam.

For me, it's about taking advantage of opportunities. While my son is in his play room or watching a movie, I am able to get some practice in.

I don't make myself play if I don't want to. On the converse, if inspiration strikes, I do all I can to get to my guitar.

I only get to actually crank my amp up and use my pedals and let it all out about once or twice a week. But as above, I just take advantage of all the opportunities I can.
Ibanez SR1200E
#18
I start with a warm up consisting of a finger stretching exercise followed by a 2 or 3 string arpeggio alternate picked as well as sweep picked and then I run through a chromatic scale with alternate and economy picking. This takes about 20 minutes. From there I move onto modes practicing each one in the key of my choosing. This takes about 10 minutes. From here I move onto scale rundowns and practice 1-2 scales in which I'm interested in learning and haven't quite got up to speed. This also takes about 10-15 minutes. I'll move onto sweep picking and go through arpeggios in which I already know as well as learning one new one only once a week and practicing that until it's burnt in my memory. I will improvise solos over backing tracks afterwards and work on exercises that focus of alternate picking, string skipping, sweep picking, legato technique and so forth. Everything but my warm up is practiced with a metronome. Starting slow and every minute - minute and a half increasing BPMs by 10 until I reach a speed I struggle with.
#19
I jam once a week with my band where we play our entire set list twice to make sure we're always ready to go.

When I'm home, I write new songs. Often the ideas in my head will be difficult to express on guitar. So I'll start from whatever part is giving me a hard time and practice techniques revolving around that.

I don't have a set practice regimen... maybe I should
#20
Boring ass exercises and shit....psh. I get my guitar, get on YouTube, find a song that makes me happy and I solo over it. I occasionally play the rhythm track if its interesting because you can't solo and improv well without knowing rhythm. Otherwise its off to the studio to record whatever idea comes to my head and I hope that I'm warmed up enough to play it fluently.
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#21
Quote by pachap
I am a married father of two kids, including a 2 year old boy who is currently terrorizing the family cat with a garden hoe. How in the hell did he smuggle the garden hoe inside the house?

Anyway, in between all that, a career, and writing a book, I don't have a lot of time for formal practice.

The playing I normally get in pretty simple. I just hang my guitar around my neck, sit on the couch, and practice. Mostly I just noodle around with blues scales, but I also try to learn new songs. Right now I have a window open with Tab Pro and I am learning Symphony of Destruction. Also polishing off Wherever I May Roam.

For me, it's about taking advantage of opportunities. While my son is in his play room or watching a movie, I am able to get some practice in.

I don't make myself play if I don't want to. On the converse, if inspiration strikes, I do all I can to get to my guitar.

I only get to actually crank my amp up and use my pedals and let it all out about once or twice a week. But as above, I just take advantage of all the opportunities I can.


This. This is exactly my "schedule" too. It will happen to all of you who practice for multiple hours a day as well. Enjoy your regular practice now. I am lucky if I get to crank the amp once a week.
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#22
I've been busy with college and work, my practice time has been a bit more laxed. I usually warm up, review some songs that I know, and do some improvisation.

Lately, I've been a bit upset with how my practicing has diminished. I want to spend more time focusing on pushing myself. I want to get my technique back on par to what it was (bit cleaner than I am now), and I want to improve my ear even further. My ear is a lot better than I gave myself credit, but it can still be better.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#23
I'll spend maybe 15 minutes just warming up with chromatic exercises, then I'll get into alternate picking for maybe 30 minutes or more, usually just bits of Paul Gilbert songs. I'll practice legato for another 30 or so minutes. Sweep picking after that. I'll just go really slowly over some basic arpeggio shapes for a while, some easier stuff from songs, and then focus more on three string rolls which I'm abysmal at. After that I'll pick a scale, if I'm not familiar with it I just play around with it for a while until I can move around somewhat comfortably with it. After that I work on learning the scale's related chords and playing progressions with them, breaking them up into arpeggios and creating melodies with the chords and scale. After that anything goes. I'll usually just noodle around and work on some songs, or go back to something I had trouble with earlier and really hammer it out.
#24
Just got back into it.Atm i will do some chromatic excersises to warm up then run through major scale patterns,Then onto alternate picking excersises,then Play around with some pentantonic/blues licks and then onto learning jazz chords oh and practice some metallica and Joe Bonamassa riffs,Oh and lately i've been learning to gallop.All until my little lad goes to bed and my misses tells me to stop playing.Gonna have a 'mancave' soon though and maybe sound proof it.
#25
Quote by pachap
I am a married father of two kids, including a 2 year old boy who is currently terrorizing the family cat with a garden hoe. How in the hell did he smuggle the garden hoe inside the house?


I hear you, bro. I had to smile when I read your post. I'm the father of two boys, about to turn 11 and 7, and what you described sounds so familiar! On the bright side, they've gotten so used to hearing me play that they don't wake up when I play through my Marshall stack late at night, as long as I don't go too nuts with the volume.

Anyway, what practice looks like...
I get about 3 hrs/day in on weekdays, and will usually go 4 or 5 on weekend days. On weekdays, I do 1 hour in the morning after I've dropped my kids off at school, before I head into work, and 2 hrs in the evening.
- The hour in the morning I spend on chords. I went for many years being satisfied with playing more metal type rhythms with just power chords, so my big chords are lagging way behind. So I'm hitting them pretty hard.
- In the evenings I warm up with a little scale work. I have a mid-term goal of being able to improvise in all 12 keys. So my scale work is a combination between warm up and the opportunity to build familiarity with the notes of whatever key I'm currently working on.
- I'll usually do two sections of improvisation. The first I'll do in free-time, to give me more of an opportunity to explore new ideas. During this section, I won't worry about stopping and starting if I find something interesting, and want to check it out a bit more and experiment with it. So this section is more of a cross between improvising and just kind of exploring possibilities. The second improvisation section I'll do to the metronome, and try to get more of a groove going, and try to get stuff to flow together more. I'll do my improvising in the key that I'm currently working on for my goal above, and switch keys every couple of weeks or so, or whenever I feel that I'm comfortable with that key and not having to think about things too much.
- I've always got one or two songs that I'm learning, so the next big chunk of time, I'll work on the three or four sections that are giving me the most trouble. If it's a specific issue that I'm working on, I'll practice a small section over and over. If it's more polishing, and getting things to flow and sound more confident, then I'll practice a longer section of the song (usually around 16 bars or so). For some parts I'll alternate between practicing a small section where the issues are, and practicing it as part of a larger section to make sure it's well integrated.
- The last section, I'll play the songs that I'm working on in whatever state they're in. I'll note the areas that I'm least happy with, and those will be the parts I practice the next day.

About working on my own stuff. I tend to go in cycles. Sometimes, I will go through a creative phase, and my practice won't look at all like what I just described. Other times, like now, I won't be feeling as creative, so I won't fight it - I'll spend my time enjoying learning some bad ass tunes and improving my playing as a result.

My biggest test for whether all of this is working, is whether I'm enjoying myself. Right now, I'm totally eating it up, so what I've described above is working for me. I'm noticing some nice improvements in my playing, so I guess I must be doing something right.
Last edited by se012101 at Apr 11, 2014,
#26
I wouldn't grace it with the name practice. I noodle about for a fair chunk of the day in several different styles. - Acoustic slide, electric slide, nylon and steel string fingerpicking. Currently trying to get my head and fingers around hybrid and flatpicking.

Yesterday was typical. Did a bit of electric slide, some hybrid picking, tried to figure out a good opening bar for "The first time ever I saw your face", made a copy of Bert Jansch's version (he send shivers down my spine) in DADGAD, with the intention of learning it.
#27
Quote by Mephaphil
It's not my job, so I don't regiment it.


+1
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#28
Scales are great for building up your chops. I don't like the idea of improvising with scales I just use my ears for that, but none the less scales are great for building those lead chops up especially if your implement string skipping within those scales. I just find it funny how people tend to learn 100's of scales thinking it's going to teach them how to improvise which only leads to disappointment.
#29
Quote by Black_devils
Scales are great for building up your chops. I don't like the idea of improvising with scales I just use my ears for that, but none the less scales are great for building those lead chops up especially if your implement string skipping within those scales. I just find it funny how people tend to learn 100's of scales thinking it's going to teach them how to improvise which only leads to disappointment.


This. Scales widen your vocabulary. The size of your vocabulary does not mean a damn thing if you can't string a coherent sentence or a beautifully phrased prose. A LOT of people are willing to imitate licks of great players while taking none of their phrasing cues or subtleties.

And look at all the people using their opportunity to the full! Last year I took my guitar to high school every week and practice in class, much to the chagrin of my classmates and my teacher.
Gear:
Jackson Dinky (JB+59) > TC Polytune Noir > TS808 clone > DOD 250 > Modded RAT > CH-1 > GE-7 > TC Flashback > Plexi Clone
Last edited by Archer250 at Apr 11, 2014,
#30
I don't have a routine, because they promote clock watching and time wasting as opposed to results. I usually start my practice with rhythmic work (currently working on going from whole notes notes-64th notes at 30), some basic warm ups (stuff from pumping nylon or steve van's workouts) and singing/ear training, then I move on to reviewing what I did the day before, learning some new music off recordings, going over troublesome spots, reviewing music I need to perform in the near future and I usually end with some improvisation (right now I'm working on playing through a basic blues unaccompanied with a metronome clicking on the and of four) followed by playing along with a funk groove for a bit, trying to hit the rhythms, durations and articulations as close to perfectly as I can (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h1qQ1SKNlgY is a good one....).
all the best.
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#31
My practice consists of learning music.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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#32
Usually some combination of the following, totaling 2-4 hours:

60min Warm ups: LH, RH, scales, chart reading, sight singing

15minutes transcription

30-45 min Jazz

30-45 min Technique

45-90min "normal music"

30-45min classical

30-45 original music/recording

Quote by tehREALcaptain
I don't have a routine, because they promote clock watching and time wasting as opposed to results.


I've had the opposite experience. Unless I set a timer or have a concrete thing I need to complete, I have a really hard time making progress consistently. Having a set amount of time with a specific skill to work on prevents my practice from degrading into aimless noodling.
Last edited by cdgraves at Apr 13, 2014,
#33
^ I think that's it in a nutshell- it depends on what you're like and you have to use the method which works best for you. (and you need to be honest with yourself)

even finding the most efficient practice regime isn't necessarily the end of the story- it may be more efficient but if it bores you to tears to the extent that you quit, that's no good either.

I'd say my practice routine degrades into aimless noodling, but that would unfairly suggest that it starts out as something more regimented
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#34
I don't have a schedule by any means. I want to make my guitar experience as enjoyable as possible and for me that's not scales and overly technical stuff. I pick a song, learn it and I pick up stuff along the way.
#35
Quote by Meooow
I don't have a schedule by any means. I want to make my guitar experience as enjoyable as possible and for me that's not scales and overly technical stuff. I pick a song, learn it and I pick up stuff along the way.



Funny thing is you're most likely missing out on the most important things the "Basics" with that type of attitude. Do you even know how to subdivide beats?