#1
Hello all! While I used to stick to just ear plugs, I've decided it's time to take my live gear up a notch and ordered some pro in ear monitors. Full warranty, bells, whistles, and highly recommended, not to mention a solid discount.

Here is my question= How important is the transmitter/receiver? My singer uses his system, and we are considering just sharing a receiver, since we both want the exact same mix.

Since I'm not chasing tone in my ears, how much does this matter?

Provided the system I pick has the range, frequencies, and options I need, will anything suffice?

Thanks. Sorry it's a little unrelate, but I'm gonna get some guitar in that mix....
Splawn Street Rod
H&K Tubemeister 5
Line 6 G90 System

Gibson SG Standard
Godin Radiator
Dillion 653 GA/3CT
Seagull Coastline s6
New Music on Spotify
#2
I've never shared a transmitter but since it is essentially a radio broadcast, you should be able to put the whole band on one mix.

FWIW they took me some getting used to and I really still prefer personal monitors, but at certain venues I must go IEM so that is what I do. I always feel a little cut off from the audience and other players. After 10 yrs of using them, that feeling hasn't changed. I can hear the vocals and instruments really well though and my ears are not ringing after 3hrs on stage so it's a mixed bag.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#3
I can't imagine sharing a mix, honestly. If your singer is as hollywood as mine, he wants so much of his voice and his guitar in his monitors that I can't hear my voice or my guitar. Add the fact that the IEMs will isolate you from the stage sounds (and your own amp) and it gets that much worse.

EDIT: At least sharing a mix with the lead singer. It might be different if the drums and bass shared the same mix or another combination without vocals.

Gear:
Partscaster/Tele into a bunch of pedals, a Maz 18 head, and a Z Best cab.
#4
I was running them in my last band. We were a 3pc singer/bass, guitar and drums. We all shared the same mix and it was fine. We also had backing tack and click in the mix. We all have our own receivers, but just one transmitter.

Honestly, if were wern't in a situation where we are using backing tracks for all of our synth parts, which makes us rely on our IEM to keep on time and start/stop at the right time I wouldn't even bother with it. We also had a pre=programmed light show so we need the click to keep in time with the changes, or we'd just look silly

When you get use to them, they're great. You hear everything clear as day (as long as the mix is good) wherever you move on stage, but it is a hassle to get use to them.

To sum it up, unless you NEED them, I think that IEM are super expensive and not really worth the money to get setup.
Guitars:
PRS Custom 24
Gibson Les Paul 60's Tribute
85' MIJ Strat
97' Snakepit Les Paul
LP Traditional 1960 Zebra
MIJ Tele
MIA Strat

Amps:
Silver Jubilee 2525
Peavey Ultra 112
Jet City JCA50H
66' Bassman
Pink Paisley Princeton RV
74' Vibro Champ
#5
We run tracks, a tracked bass, and have a click, so its nearly impossible to get a solid mix from wedges. Half the time we can't hear any of the tracks, and for a few songs it's super important to do that. I also do a lot of off stage and in the crowd stuff at festivals and colleges, where they pay the big bucks haha, and It's crazy how a drummers high hat can get lost in the mix.

ON the other note, my singer isn't that big of a diva, so it wont be the end of the world. We also got our in ears for close to half price, so it wasn't the end of the world.

I just don't wanna spend a lot of money on a transmitter if it won't matter that much.
Splawn Street Rod
H&K Tubemeister 5
Line 6 G90 System

Gibson SG Standard
Godin Radiator
Dillion 653 GA/3CT
Seagull Coastline s6
New Music on Spotify
#6
Quote by Katsock
We run tracks, a tracked bass, and have a click, so its nearly impossible to get a solid mix from wedges. Half the time we can't hear any of the tracks, and for a few songs it's super important to do that. I also do a lot of off stage and in the crowd stuff at festivals and colleges, where they pay the big bucks haha, and It's crazy how a drummers high hat can get lost in the mix.

ON the other note, my singer isn't that big of a diva, so it wont be the end of the world. We also got our in ears for close to half price, so it wasn't the end of the world.

I just don't wanna spend a lot of money on a transmitter if it won't matter that much.


You should be fine with the one transmitter. It works for us.

If you're gonna get a good deal on it then its not a bad idea. Once you get use to them it'll really help your stage game.
Guitars:
PRS Custom 24
Gibson Les Paul 60's Tribute
85' MIJ Strat
97' Snakepit Les Paul
LP Traditional 1960 Zebra
MIJ Tele
MIA Strat

Amps:
Silver Jubilee 2525
Peavey Ultra 112
Jet City JCA50H
66' Bassman
Pink Paisley Princeton RV
74' Vibro Champ
#7
If you are working with backing tracks and click, IEM is the only way to go. We did that for a while a few years ago but had lots of techie issues. I think/hope we are done playing to tracks forever.

One of my favorite trainwreck vids ever was when Van Halen played to tracks during "Jump" a few years ago and the sound guys got the sample rate wrong. The keys came in 1/4 step off key and Eddie valiantly tried to play the tune by bending up to pitch. Oh my... It happens to the best of them.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY