#1
Hey guys.
I'm owner of an electric guitar for about two months now and I realized that I'm following the pattern I used to follow when I played acoustic guitar - I'm learning new songs but I feel like I'm not developing at all. They're all at the same level of difficulty and they're fun for me for just a moment. Sometimes I start to practice a song and I'm reaching the moment when the solo begins or (when the song is solo itself, like Farewell Ballad) it gets harsh and I have to let it go with the belief that one day I'll be able to play the whole melody.
I know that there are some exercises or techniques I have to handle to make those songs easier for me, but I can't really find myself in the whole vastness of them, so my request is - is there an order of skills you have to master to progress? What not a beginner, but little more advanced player should learn? What scales etc? I have a feeling that something like this could be here somewhere, so if anyone could guide me, I promise I'll make a tribute-song for you in the future.
The other question is, what were your milestones in playing guitar? What rock/metal songs made you become a better guitarist? I'd love to hear your examples.
Cheers!
#2
I wouldn't even know where to begin responding to this question..
I'll be really brief and say:

You wont improve if you don't challenge yourself, so challenge yourself all the time. A big word of caution though in that there is a significant difference between a challenge and the impossible. Trying to learn the impossible wont help. Appreciate the impossible for what it is and realize that in time it will eventually not be the impossible and instead be a challenge.

There is no order of skills to learn.

Please ignore scales for now. Scales are entirely pointless for a beginner lacking motivation and wanting to improve. Scales and theory go hand in hand, and scales and theory will not motivate a beginner, so ignore scales for now.


As for milestones / songs that helped me.. There's way too many to mention, but for any aspiring lead guitarist there is always one single guitar solo that i always recommend to beginners and i can't even begin to explain how much it helped me improve. Not just in a mechanical sense, but it also made me realize that there's more to lead guitar and guitar in general than just hitting the right note. It led to my discovery of the all important "technique" known as phrasing. Good phrasing is to me the most important "technique" of any on the guitar. I use the word technique in reference to phrasing very loosely because it isn't so much a single technique but a combination of every little nuance of all known techniques that comes from your fingers.

The solo i mentioned would be Chapter Four by Avenged Sevenfold



Skip to 4:15 minutes in or so.
Last edited by vayne92 at Apr 12, 2014,
#4
Quote by pilarenko
Hey guys.
I'm owner of an electric guitar for about two months now and I realized that I'm following the pattern I used to follow when I played acoustic guitar - I'm learning new songs but I feel like I'm not developing at all. They're all at the same level of difficulty and they're fun for me for just a moment. Sometimes I start to practice a song and I'm reaching the moment when the solo begins or (when the song is solo itself, like Farewell Ballad) it gets harsh and I have to let it go with the belief that one day I'll be able to play the whole melody.
I know that there are some exercises or techniques I have to handle to make those songs easier for me, but I can't really find myself in the whole vastness of them, so my request is - is there an order of skills you have to master to progress? What not a beginner, but little more advanced player should learn? What scales etc? I have a feeling that something like this could be here somewhere, so if anyone could guide me, I promise I'll make a tribute-song for you in the future.
The other question is, what were your milestones in playing guitar? What rock/metal songs made you become a better guitarist? I'd love to hear your examples.
Cheers!


"What scales "
Oh the basic: C Major and its modes, then you can try anything you want from Here

I can't really help you with *order*, but I can tell you that you should have your rhythm down before you try melodies and leads.

" What rock/metal songs made you become a better guitarist?"
Well, the first solo I could play was Iron Maiden's The Trooper... the first solo I could completely imitate was UFO's High Flyer (I suggest you practice this tune -- finger picking, rhythm and leads) , and the solo that made me feel sure I was able to shred was Judas Priest's Metal Meltdown.

Here. After you practice your fingerings and your rhythms, spend some time practicing this song. The entire song.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wc2-C7SGAmw
Gear:
Jackson Dinky (JB+59) > TC Polytune Noir > TS808 clone > DOD 250 > Modded RAT > CH-1 > GE-7 > TC Flashback > Plexi Clone
Last edited by Archer250 at Apr 12, 2014,
#6
Quote by pilarenko
Great tune, I'll take a look at solo's tab later. Thank you.


Don't try the solo just yet. In fact, don't try it at all until you're sure you can do it by ear.
Gear:
Jackson Dinky (JB+59) > TC Polytune Noir > TS808 clone > DOD 250 > Modded RAT > CH-1 > GE-7 > TC Flashback > Plexi Clone
#7
I started by playing songs and if there's a technique(harmonics,palm muting,tremolo picking)things like that,then i would look it up and after about a year i'm able to play farely good and understand music. I guess i would say every song i learn makes me a better guitarist lol
#8
Quote by Archer250
Don't try the solo just yet. In fact, don't try it at all until you're sure you can do it by ear.


er, wat? if he wants to get good at solos having had no experience with them, just telling him to work them all out by ear is of little help.

listen to good solos and get tabs/music so you're sure you're doing it right from the get go. later you can worry about working them out by ear.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#9
Quote by Dave_Mc
er, wat? if he wants to get good at solos having had no experience with them, just telling him to work them all out by ear is of little help.


Hm.. true dat...
Gear:
Jackson Dinky (JB+59) > TC Polytune Noir > TS808 clone > DOD 250 > Modded RAT > CH-1 > GE-7 > TC Flashback > Plexi Clone
#10
Thanks for the reaction, response is amazing and it motivated me so much. But the discussion about milestones can still go on.
#11
Quote by Archer250
Hm.. true dat...


I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#12
Milestones in playing? What rock/metal songs made you become a better guitarist?

Good questions. I guess for playing it would be decide to get an electric guitar and the music I was most interested in some form which was 2 TAB books with Metallica being Kill'em'all and the black album. I then began teaching myself what I wanted to play. After that my ears started to develop and I could pick stuff up if I wanted to and it was not too technical a style like Yngwie/Troy Stetina.

The other thing was being able to improvise without thinking about it which started I guess with learning from TAB books as when it came to leads I could follow but not really focus on how the lead would go so the mechanics got down but not the actual lead so to speak. then when I started to exchange cassette tapes it just expanded. Eventually I got a band and that is another milestone because of being in a band you have to adjust to the music and the ones you play with. While jamming Hendrix I got the biggest milestones and thankfully I did some recordings that 10 years later sounds pretty amazing still to my ears.

Another thing is being totally aware of what I need to do go in any style I desire to do. So learning an Yngwie tune at the age of 39 along with Speed Mechanics Troy Stetina skills it comes out pretty good if I focus and follow to get it down.

I am just a player whatever I like I do.
#13
Like what vayne has mentioned, you will only improve if you challenge yourself. It's not everyday that I do this, but all the breakthroughs I've had in my technique were from practicing my ass off for a song that I really like that's a little too difficult for me.

The biggest breakthroughs I've had personally were (in chronological order):
Fade to Black by Metallica - Not a big fan of the song, especially after so many repeated listenings, but both solos cleaned up my alternate and economical picking a lot. They were still pretty shit by the time I got most of the song down, but it was a huge improvemnet.

Erotomania by Dream Theater - Didn't get the whole song down due to the annoying string skipping part that I need to massively clean up. The rest of the song helped me clean up my alternate picking a lot and introduced to me a song that can be considered kind of technical.

Premonition by Joe Satriani - Really liked the song, so I decided to learn it. This was the first song I remember grinding on the guitar to because there were parts of the song that weren't easy, but were juuuuust right out of my abilities.

Classical Gas by Mason Williams - Nothing too special about this. Just learned the first minute or so, but it really opened up my fingerstyle playing since it was the second fingerstyle song I learned.

In The Presence of Enemies Part 1 by Dream Theater - There are only 2 or 3 parts of this song that are way out of my abilities, so I decided to try to learn this. Helped me improve a fair bit, but the difference isn't as big as when I first learned Fade to Black.