#1
Hi, I need tips for writing a good Em lead guitar part. The image in my head is metal song with a Gothic, Circus, Pirate feel (what would that be called). How should I approach this idea and get that sound. I'd like advice and not the usual; "Learn theory man", "use your ears and learn stuff", and "We can't hear what's in your head". I'll even give separate examples of what I'm after.

"The Greatest Show Unearthed" (Creature Feature). This is for the Circus rock part.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2KWvVO7Kp0k

"You Are A Pirate" (Alestorm). This for the Pirate Metal part.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GXoZsgNHquM

"Phantoms" (Paik). This covers both the Gothic and Circus parts.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9tQKrPUwICg

I think a mixture of the above is what I'm after. Any advice would be helpful and appreciated.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#2
Have you learnt the songs above and figured out how they get the sound you like?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
Sorry Ronald but it's the boring advice, there just aren't any shortcuts. NO-one has them and there are plenty of people who will try and sell you 40 shortcuts, but they are only trying to take your money.

If you want to solo in Em then you have to use the notes of an Em scale, anything else and it isn't Em.

Whether you learn the Em scale by learning the theory (probably the easiest way) or by ear or by finding a box pattern (the shape on the fretboard) you need to know where the notes are. Every Em solo ever written or played is just these notes in a different order with different timings.

You may wish to fly, gravity says otherwise.
#4
The only way to learn a style is to learn songs in that style and analyze them. The only way to do that is use your ears, and the more theory you know the easier it gets to understand what's going on. If you don't want to use your ears, learn stuff, or learn music theory, then how the hell will you learn to write music in that style? What do you want us to do, write the music for you?

I've played around with "circus" styled music before, but I don't know what you expect me to tell you, other than to try to sound "circusy". All I can really say is that it tends to use lots of chromatic passing tones and do a lot of "out of key" type stuff, while still sounding kinda lighthearted. Basically, use a lot of dissonant phrasing and slightly dissonant chords, but in a way that sounds kinda playful. Of course, none of this is helpful at all unless you're at least willing to "use your ears and learn stuff"
#5
To The4thHorseman, actually that's very helpful because the idea of using chromatic passing tones and playfulness is what I'm looking for. As for the Pirate part, I know it uses plenty of 8th notes and Dorian but what else? If you can't tell I'm not great at analyzing styles and sometimes need advice (figuring out phrasing, chord progressions, ect isn't my strong point). When trying to write Doom Metal. I learned "Ina Gadda Da Vida" and "Electric Funeral just to know that tempos between 60-96 are good and make things memorable. Thanks you.

The only way to mix styles is to blend their characteristics in a tasteful way. That's why I'm asking. The reason I chose E Minor is because it happens to be my favorite scale and is similar to A Minor (my other favorite scale).
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#6
Quote by RonaldPoe
As for the Pirate part, I know it uses plenty of 8th notes and Dorian but what else?

Just a minor note: You don't have to use a scale that use the intervals of the Dorian to sound "pirate-y". It all depends on how you compose and play it. A scale like might be a good fit, but I would advise against using ONLY the notes a of a specific scale. Use whatever notes "describe" the sound, whether they're in your scale of choice or not.

In this case, think of your music as describing a picture. What kind of melody, harmony, soundscape as a whole...etc. describes the picture you want? Chances are, your music will better describe the picture if you don't nail yourself down to "I'm gonna use this scale". By all means, use that scale as a starting point. But it's JUST a starting point, imho.


Make sense?


Btw, only reason I bring this up is because I hear a lot of younger musicians thinking they should pick a scale to describe a certain feeling, when they should think more about the whole picture, so to speak.
#7
A while ago I figured out how pointless it is to expect scales to sound like certain styles. Most the things Metalheads, weirdoes, and rockers want to do can be done with a simple Minor/Aeolian scale. If it doesn't sound right, you're not doing it right. What I'm asking is for common elements I can use to evoke a pirate sound like chord progressions, phrasing tip, ect. I'm doing this to obtain a style all my own.

Really the pirate part is all I have left to achieve (already got enough information for the Gothic and Circus style sounds). Also Metal is diverse enough to write with just feeling, some distortion, and a little theory so I don't need tips for that.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#8
Abuse the hell out of the minor sixth. The GOTH interval!
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#9
Just play w/e the first thing that comes to mind for you. Don't make it so calculated. Follow your instincts. All this questioning and wondering is just self-doubt. Do w/e you think is best. And **** anybody who tells you otherwise. That's how you separate yourself from the rest of the sheep.
#10
My advice on this is to find a melody (minor) from another song. The older the better. Start with that and put it into E minor then mess a bit with the rhythm or pull a few notes out or add a couple in. Maybe something like "Scarboro Fair'. In jazz that is done a lot. Using a melody from one song as the basis of a solo in another, just transposed into the current key. The only way to be a melodic player is to play MELODIES. Learning melodies is the key to playing melodically. Only then will you be able to extract melodies from scales. Scales by themselves are not music.