#1
Well I've had this guitar for a couple of years and only just found out the ridiculous scale, thanks to RondoMusic not removing their webpages of previous/sold guitars. (well removing them from their website but not from existence)

specs here: Agile Interceptor Pro 627

The Agile Interceptors are machines built for 7 strings but I got my hands on a 6 string version, Were these guitars made for Drop B - Drop A tuning?

Tbh, it plays really well down to Drop B without sounding too muddy or anything, haven't tried going lower, I do plan on getting a setup with 12-56 Ernie Ball Not Even Slinky strings in Drop B though.
#2
Quote by Pyroxene
Well I've had this guitar for a couple of years and only just found out the ridiculous scale, thanks to RondoMusic not removing their webpages of previous/sold guitars. (well removing them from their website but not from existence)

specs here: Agile Interceptor Pro 627


you have a baritone guitar, they are usually tuned a 4th or 5th lower than a standard guitar (sometimes even lower). so you'll want to select your tuning you want and then pick your string gauge (12-54 is considered a light set for baritone) to implement the tuning.

you may have need baritone guitar strings as well, i believe these strings are longer to accommodate the longer scale of the neck. i wanna say i have heard people complain that standard strings are long enough.

Quote by Pyroxene
The Agile Interceptors are machines built for 7 strings but I got my hands on a 6 string version, Were these guitars made for Drop B - Drop A tuning?


they are made for any lower tunings, they are not made for any specific tuning. but generally they are used to tune down at least one 4th lower (i have heard of tuning a major third lower though).

baritones far predate contemporary metal playing though, so they were not invented to metal applications. the beach boys were known to use baritones for example.

Quote by Pyroxene
Tbh, it plays really well down to Drop B without sounding too muddy or anything, haven't tried going lower, I do plan on getting a setup with 12-56 Ernie Ball Not Even Slinky strings in Drop B though.


if you want to play a 4th lower than a 12 or 13 gauge set will work, if you want to go lower than that you may want to look at a 15 to 17 gauge set.

if you want to play 'drop B' (which i am going to assume is B, F#, B, E, G#, C#) then this would be considered a pretty high tuning for a baritone. they generally are tuned a whole step lower than your intended tuning.

so something like B, E, A, D, F#, B is usually where a baritone is tuned.
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-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Apr 12, 2014,
#3
Guitars with 27" scales (the "627" model name means 6-string, 27" scale) are not necessarily baritones. Jim Soloway's guitars (his Swan series) often have 27" scales but are tuned to standard. The result is a beautiful piano-like bottom end, and a lot of jazz type players love them.

Baritones usually start around 28", but "baritone" refers to the tuning and not to the scale length in any case. Baritone tuning is like standard E, except that it's standard B with an F# instead of a G (B-E-A-D-F♯-B). Anything that dances around this tuning should be fine, and some people tune these to standard B as well.
#4
Quote by Pyroxene
Well I've had this guitar for a couple of years and only just found out the ridiculous scale,


What means "ridiculous" scale? You bought a guitar and didn't know what the scale was?
#5
No reason you couldn't shove 9-42 on that thing and stay in E standard. The strings still wouldn't feel quite as tight as if you were using 10-46 on a 25.5" in E standard. There's not a huge difference, but it's enough that low tunings can sound "better" on the longer scale length.

I use an 8-string tuned to Drop E (EBEADGBE) that's 25.5". Many would argue that the scale length is far too short, but I like it.
"Air created the greenness. And once you've got something, that leads to otherness." - Karl Pilkington.
#6
I have a 30" OLP bari that I tune to open D with 10-46 strings, it would work fine in D standard intervals. I could do this just as well with a standard guitar scale, but what I get is a very chimey resonant sound that is ideal for slide. IOW, you don't have to think of a long scale as being a bari, you can think of it as a different option for standard or near-standard tunings, as others have said.
#7
Quote by Lavatain
No reason you couldn't shove 9-42 on that thing and stay in E standard. The strings still wouldn't feel quite as tight as if you were using 10-46 on a 25.5" in E standard. There's not a huge difference, but it's enough that low tunings can sound "better" on the longer scale length.


I have a 24.75" and a 25.5" scale guitar, both strung with Ernie Ball skinny top-heavy bottom strings (10-52) and both tuned to 'E' standard. The shorter scale length is noticably slacker than the 25.5 guitar. As far as I know, the longer scale length is used so that unfeasibly thick strings are not needed for lower tunings.
My Gear:- A guitar, a guitar lead, a guitar amplifier. Or sometimes just an acoustic guitar!
#8
the reason for baritone guitars is so you can tune lower and not have to go to thicker strings to maintain tension. thick strings that are marketed as baritone are intended for regular scale length guitars.