#1
New player issue......or is it a freaking misprint?


I was looking at the opening notes of a song I wanted to learn and am not understanding how this is even possible.....neither my son or I could make the 2/7 stretch. With both have fairly long fingers, too. I'm 6'5" and he is 6'6". We got a laugh out of being too short for something.


Angus and Malcom must have freakish hands.


Tab is from the Amsco "The Best of AC/DC: Guitar Tablature Edition"


Song is The Jack.
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2014 Gibson SG Special
Peavey Classic 30
Squier Standard Stratocaster HSS
Fender CD60CE
Fender v2 Mustang III
Roland Micro Cube
MXR M75
#3
I can do it. Just about and it's a pretty awkward stretch (and on a completely unrelated note, i think i need to go to the hospital now ), but yeah. I'm ~5ft 10-11". It's more to do with practice than physical size, I think (at least assuming you don't have incredibly small hands).
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#4
That's a pretty common thing in "rock n roll" 5th, 6th and 7ths. Good exercise would be to practice higher on the fretboard where the frets are closer and PRACTICE the most efficient hand posture. Bend your wrist, push forward so it's closer to aligning below the fretboard, keep your thumb and first finger as straight as possible (1st finger mutes the unplayed strings) and as this becomes more natural, move lower and lower on the fretboard over multiple practice sessions.

Having said that, I worked with a guy with small hands years ago, great singer and great guitar player who played those shapes by moving the root an octave higher (therefore same fret as the 5th) and using his 3rd and 4th fingers to play the 6th and 7ths.

Guys like Dave Mustaine or even Hendrix with large hands have an advantage but most of us can adapt if we work at being more efficient in hand positions and postures. Good luck
#5
That's like playing some blues.

Keep your index finger on the B (2nd fret, 5th string) and your middle finger on the F#(4th fret, 4th string), then use your pinky to reach the G#(6th fret, 4th string) and the A (7th fret, 4th string).

A little practice and you can play this,
|------------------------------------------------
|------------------------------------------------
|------------------------------------------------
|--4-4--6-6--7-7--6-6--4-4--6-6--7-7--6-6--
|--2-2--2-2--2-2--2-2--2-2--2-2--2-2--2-2--
|------------------------------------------------

|-----------------------------------------------
|-----------------------------------------------
|--4-4--6-6--7-7--6-6--4-4--6-6--7-7--6-6-
|--2-2--2-2--2-2--2-2--2-2--2-2--2-2--2-2-
|-----------------------------------------------
|-----------------------------------------------


It's hard to reach at first but you'll get it. Or the way SuperKid provided which shouldn't be a problem as long as you mute those notes that aren't present.

Quote by SuperKid
try this:
|-------
|-------
|----1-2
|--4-x-x
|--2-2-2
|-------

same notes, you dont have to use the exact same fingerings as the book
Last edited by DoubleBassCrash at Apr 12, 2014,
#6
It's a possible stretch, just something you've got to get your fingers used to. I cant add much to what other people have said other than it's like that get a deeper timbre than moving to the G string. It's same reason a lot of Black Sabbath songs play power chords on the E and A instead of the A and D were it would be arguably more comfortable e.g. Paranoid, War Pigs.
#7
Thanks, everyone.


Gotta keep working at it. Just seemed unreal at first.
2014 Gibson SG Special
Peavey Classic 30
Squier Standard Stratocaster HSS
Fender CD60CE
Fender v2 Mustang III
Roland Micro Cube
MXR M75
#8
Do it like Superkid. Angus and Malcolm are really small players, and even though they play Gibsons with shorter scales than we do, they're not big fans of stretching.
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#9
I think this is how Angus plays it FWIW:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5GT06lgeiY4
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#10
1. That's not a barre chord. Technically, that's not even a chord at all, but rather a double stop.
2. Just because you're tall doesn't necessarily mean that your hands are big. A friend of mine is 9 inches shorter than me but his hands are much bigger.
3. That's definitely doable. As you get more used to the guitar and used to doing wider stretches, it'll seem relatively easy.
4. Working on your flexibility in your fingers is more useful than just relying on the size of your hands.
Quote by Geldin
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Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#11
Quote by Junior#1
1. That's not a barre chord. Technically, that's not even a chord at all, but rather a double stop.
2. Just because you're tall doesn't necessarily mean that your hands are big. A friend of mine is 9 inches shorter than me but his hands are much bigger.
3. That's definitely doable. As you get more used to the guitar and used to doing wider stretches, it'll seem relatively easy.
4. Working on your flexibility in your fingers is more useful than just relying on the size of your hands.
This, and may I add:
5. Angus and Malcolm Young don't have freakishly big hands: they're friggin' tiny. I mean they're practically a few inches away of being a midget tribute band to themselves. That schoolboy outfit Angus likes to wear on stage? Actual size



So I guess what I'm saying is: size don't really enter into it, 99% of the time it's mainly about strength and technique. If you wan't another example of this try playing Every Breath You Take the way Andy Summers plays it (without a capo). That guy doesn't have big hands either but he's remarkably strong

The 2nd chord of that tune has you stretching from the 2nd to the 6th fret but the 2nd fret has to be barred over 4 strings (you really have to hold the chord even though the notes are played independently, or else it won't sound right)

E----
B----
G-2-
D-6-
A-4-
E-2-

Message in a Bottle is a bit easier to conquer but those sus2 chords are great for practicing some basic stretches as well

Good luck!

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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
#12
Quote by shwilly
This, and may I add:
5. Angus and Malcolm Young don't have freakishly big hands: they're friggin' tiny. I mean they're practically a few inches away of being a midget tribute band to themselves. That schoolboy outfit Angus likes to wear on stage? Actual size



So I guess what I'm saying is: size don't really enter into it, 99% of the time it's mainly about strength and technique. If you wan't another example of this try playing Every Breath You Take the way Andy Summers plays it (without a capo). That guy doesn't have big hands either but he's remarkably strong

The 2nd chord of that tune has you stretching from the 2nd to the 6th fret but the 2nd fret has to be barred over 4 strings (you really have to hold the chord even though the notes are played independently, or else it won't sound right)

E----
B----
G-2-
D-6-
A-4-
E-2-

Message in a Bottle is a bit easier to conquer but those sus2 chords are great for practicing some basic stretches as well

Good luck!



Good Lord, that doesn't even seem humanly possible at this point.


One thing is for certain....my left hand is really gaining in flexibility.....but a long way to go.
2014 Gibson SG Special
Peavey Classic 30
Squier Standard Stratocaster HSS
Fender CD60CE
Fender v2 Mustang III
Roland Micro Cube
MXR M75
#13
Guys, have we considered the possibility that Angus and Malcolm played it differently? Sure, hand size may not matter much, but these are freakin' midgets we're talking about.
Gear:
Jackson Dinky (JB+59) > TC Polytune Noir > TS808 clone > DOD 250 > Modded RAT > CH-1 > GE-7 > TC Flashback > Plexi Clone
#14
Thanks a ton, Cajundaddy.

The video helped.


Quote by Archer250
Guys, have we considered the possibility that Angus and Malcolm played it differently? Sure, hand size may not matter much, but these are freakin' midgets we're talking about.


Midgets with superhuman digits.

I generally wear size 10 or 11 gloves.....but there is always a lot more room in the little finger area. I broke my little pinky a couple of times on the football field and it is crooked. It works and I have control over it.....it's just not the same ratio as the rest of my fingers.

I'm going to have to learn some alternate ways of playing some stuff, I suppose.


As I stated.....I'm a beginner in every sense of the word and this amount of stretch surprised me.
2014 Gibson SG Special
Peavey Classic 30
Squier Standard Stratocaster HSS
Fender CD60CE
Fender v2 Mustang III
Roland Micro Cube
MXR M75
#15
Big stretches are not unusual on barre chords. Once you get some good relaxation and finger independence, you'll be able to play with a barre as if it were a capo, at least within about a 4th of the barre.

When I'm doing warmups I'll do a hammer/pull ladder with each finger. When I do the pinky and index, the biggest stretch is from 5-11, a tritone. The hardest stretch for me is actually the ring and pinky whole step, frets 5-7.

Here's a fun barre stretch: 3x5368 Gm11 or x37363 Csus4add6-ish (ambiguous harmony).
Last edited by cdgraves at Apr 14, 2014,
#16
Quote by cdgraves
Big stretches are not unusual on barre chords. Once you get some good relaxation and finger independence, you'll be able to play with a barre as if it were a capo, at least within about a 4th of the barre.

When I'm doing warmups I'll do a hammer/pull ladder with each finger. When I do the pinky and index, the biggest stretch is from 5-11, a tritone. The hardest stretch for me is actually the ring and pinky whole step, frets 5-7.

Here's a fun barre stretch: 3x5368 Gm11 or x37363 Csus4add6-ish (ambiguous harmony).



Thanks.


It's getting better on the stretches....and like you said it improves with relaxing my hands.


I'll give those a try, too ^^^^^.


I've got some practice time set up this morning.
2014 Gibson SG Special
Peavey Classic 30
Squier Standard Stratocaster HSS
Fender CD60CE
Fender v2 Mustang III
Roland Micro Cube
MXR M75