#1
My current go to guitar for metal or any other high gain/ tough tone music is an Ltd Ec-1000. I love the guitar, but when I start tuning down past drop B things start to get a little muddy. Currently my setup is in drop Bb with 12-60 strings.


I'm thinking about getting a 7 string, and any help in choosing one would be greatly appreciated! I've played an Ibanez 7321 and a friend's 7421 and can honestly say that I hated them. Neck shape was flat and felt awful, just a bad deal overall.

So far I've considered the Agile Septor; it's in a good price range for my first 7. Also undecided on choosing a 725 or 727

Long story short, any 7 string recommendations, and if so, should I go baritone scale or standard scale? String gauge aside. I'm more worried about tone. Tuning will be anywhere from Drop A to Drop G.

Thanks!
#2
Quote by gglenn13
I've played an Ibanez 7321 and a friend's 7421 and can honestly say that I hated them. Neck shape was flat and felt awful, just a bad deal overall.


Well then..... (see sig)

Honestly if you like LTD and ESP you could also consider getting a used 7 string from them if you can find it.

Agiles are nice, but I wouldn't buy one unless I was paying over $500. The quality with them is kind of hit and miss. About three quarters of the guitars they put out are good from what I hear. Again, if you can find one used just to try it go for it.

You could also try out a Schecter Omen 7... but Schecter.....

It would be really useful to know your budget and location if you want to do used.

EDIT: Also, if you are doing Drop tunings like that exclusively, the extended scale might be worth it. However, just remember more wood=more money.
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Fender Franken-Jag Bass

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Last edited by TheStig1214 at Apr 13, 2014,
#3
No personal offense!

The Agiles I was looking at were a Septor pro 725 ($650) and a Septor Elite 727 ($699). Pro 725 wins for finish and looks, but Elite has slightly better hardware and longer scale. It's between the two if I go Agile.

Budget is about $600 to $800.
#4
Yeah I'd go with Agile. My friend has a Interceptor Pro 727. He loves the guitar's feel, just not the EMG 707s or the Floyd. I have the same issues with it. Like I said, for drop tunings it's probably best to go with the longer scale.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#5
Scale lenght is only factor that makes your string more tense. You can go away with 24,75 scale and still tune A1 drop/standard with 74. I got set up 25,5 for Adgcea with 68-12 Elixirs and its fine, too light at the top ..you known 12 gauge. Generally i got also 26,5 scale 7 and 25,5 scale 7 . If you are going for some G stuff on 25,5 i reccomend .080 wound if its 27- 26,5 , 0.75 string is enough tight, just like 60 at C on 25.5
#6
Quote by rockstar256
Scale lenght is only factor that makes your string more tense. You can go away with 24,75 scale and still tune A1 drop/standard with 74. I got set up 25,5 for Adgcea with 68-12 Elixirs and its fine, too light at the top ..you known 12 gauge. Generally i got also 26,5 scale 7 and 25,5 scale 7 . If you are going for some G stuff on 25,5 i reccomend .080 wound if its 27- 26,5 , 0.75 string is enough tight, just like 60 at C on 25.5


The extended scale length helps with intonation though. An 80 gauge string on a 24.75 tuned to A won't be the same tone wise way up the neck as a 58 on a 26.5 tuned to A. Sure, the math is all there, but in reality it's just better with a longer scale. The lighter strings are easier on the fingers too.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#7
Like I said, tension doesn't matter, because I can make it up with string gauge. The scale length is for tone mostly.

For those who have experience with 27" scale, how difficult is it to play leads? I'm pretty comfortable with 5-6 fret stretches on my 24.75 scale (higher frets). Will the change be pretty noticeable?
#8
Quote by gglenn13
Like I said, tension doesn't matter, because I can make it up with string gauge. The scale length is for tone mostly.

For those who have experience with 27" scale, how difficult is it to play leads? I'm pretty comfortable with 5-6 fret stretches on my 24.75 scale (higher frets). Will the change be pretty noticeable?


My friend's Interceptor is 27". Every time I play it it does get a bit getting used to. I do a lot of low range tapping (frets 3-7 on the bottom strings) and with the extended scale it is hard. For leads high up on the board it's not that huge of a difference.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#9
Quote by gglenn13
Like I said, tension doesn't matter, because I can make it up with string gauge. The scale length is for tone mostly.

For those who have experience with 27" scale, how difficult is it to play leads? I'm pretty comfortable with 5-6 fret stretches on my 24.75 scale (higher frets). Will the change be pretty noticeable?


I've used one of Jim Soloway's 27" SWAN guitars for leads, but I whined, pissed and moaned about it. It wasn't downtuned; it was set up for standard tuning with maybe 11's. The sound was heavenly, bending was hell. For starters, you have to push across a wider expanse of fretboard to stretch the string by the same proportional amount. The good news is that the fretboard was 1/8th" wider over the entire length. The bad news was that it took some serious muscle power and some better callouses than I had built up to that point. Once I got used to it, going back to an LP with 9's was a breeze.

The scale length is there for tone, yes. Think of a cheap spinet piano (relatively short string length) -- if you play the last three notes at the bottom of the piano, they'll sound virtually identical. Very difficult to tell them apart. Play the same three notes at the bottom of a 9' grand piano and they'll be sonorous and very distinguishable.

If you're doing leads, you might take a long look at the Agile multi-scale fan-fret (Pendulum) guitars, particularly the ones that have a 25.5" scale for the treble side and a 27" scale on the bass side (they'll be designated 2527 somewhere in the guitar name).
The fan frets will feel absolutely natural within a day or two and you'll probably hate going back to straight frets.