Page 1 of 2
#1
I've been putting off this decision for a long time, because it's a very real fear of mine.

I've been following a BSC in Product Design for the last 2 years now, and I did an engineering foundation course prior to that. But the problem is that I just hate all of it. I just don't see myself having any level of passion for it. So if I'm going to do somebody else's bidding for at least the next 50 years of my life, obviously I want to do something I love.

As of this time, I've been finishing off my second year and I've been asked by my parents how I'm going to get a placement. To say that I'm really dreading it is an understatement. I'm terrified. I've probably never been so scared in my life. And it's all because I hate where my life is leading.

In about a month, I'm going to be visiting a very close friend for the first time in MA. In the past year, I've been desperate to find what I want to do with myself. Being a therapist is the closest thing I've got to something that I'd like to do for a living. So what my friend and his family have decided to do is to show me around some universities and colleges I could go to, for study.

But my course qualifications have nothing psychology-related in them whatsoever. Which means that I would have to start over with an entirely new career, at 22 years old, while still having to pay a student loan for the engineering studies that I hate.

So I feel completely suffocated and pessimistic about ever doing something I enjoy. I'd rather just kill myself, honestly, if I don't get an offer in anything, or if i cannot afford it. Because the amount of pain in knowing that I've let my family down, is nothing compared to the suffering of having to do somebody else's bidding for the rest of my life, and in a field that I hate.

So what am I supposed to do now? I feel I've completely ****ed myself over, and all I'm doing now is just trying to put off the inevitable.

Is there hope? Is there anything I can do?
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#2
Chill broseph. College degree does not mean you have to do what you studied. That's a rookie mistake.

Relax, get to know lots of people in different places, and things will fall into the right place.

...modes and scales are still useless.


Quote by PhoenixGRM
Hey guys could you spare a minute to Vote for my band. Go to the site Search our band Listana with CTRL+F for quick and vote Thank you .
Quote by sam b
Voted for Patron Çıldırdı.

Thanks
Quote by PhoenixGRM
But our Band is Listana
#5
Quote by Xiaoxi
Chill broseph. College degree does not mean you have to do what you studied. That's a rookie mistake.

Relax, get to know lots of people in different places, and things will fall into the right place.

What about those who do?

If I wanted to be a therapist, obviously nobody is going to be interested in employing me if I have no qualifications. There would just be no reason to hire me when there are so many people out there that do have the qualifications.
Quote by jimmydvn
what country do you live in?

UK.
Quote by Godsmack_IV
How do you learn design without learning any psych? Or am I completely off mark with my idea of Product Design?

Only in the context of marketing does that apply.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Apr 13, 2014,
#6
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
What about those who do?

If I wanted to be a therapist, obviously nobody is going to be interested in employing me if I have no qualifications. There would just be no reason to hire me when there are so many people out there that do have the qualifications.


Which nothing is stopping you from doing. It seems terrifying, but trust me, you can do anything.

The best thing you can do is finish your course if you ask me, especially the placement. You might find that the job is very much different to the study. I studied Civil Engineering, and work for the worlds 4th largest privately owned water company. My job has absolutely no bearing on the study I did.

It's as important to find out what's not right for you, as it is to find out what is right for you if you ask me.
Quote by GLP_Arclite
Pooping is well good though, to be fair.


I've got a handle on the fiction.

I'm losing my grip, 'cos I'm losing my fingers.
#7
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Only in the context of marketing does that apply.


Maybe in terms of whatever 'product design' is. But in terms of design in general, you're designing something to be used by people. If you're interested in psychology, check out Donald Norman's book The Design of Everyday Things, formerly The Psychology of Everyday Things.

edit

Looking through Product Design BSc programs from different schools, about half of them incorporate psychology and the other half fall more in line with engineering rather than design.
Last edited by Godsmack_IV at Apr 13, 2014,
#8
Quote by metacarpi
Which nothing is stopping you from doing. It seems terrifying, but trust me, you can do anything.


I want to believe that, I really, REALLY want to believe that, but I just can't.

I've been so heavily pressured into doing things I don't want to do all my life, which is the very reason I even did engineering in the first place. Because engineering is something that is so deeply ingrained into my family, I haven't had the chance to experience anything else. Combine that with always being scared of them and what they would do to me if I decided to say no, and I end up in this disaster.

I've been faking an interest in engineering my whole life because that is what was expected of me when I was growing up. I didn't really know what I wanted to do with my life, yet I knew more about engineering than most kids my age given my background, so it made sense to me at the time to expand upon that knowledge. It was a trainwreck of an idea.

When you've lived a lie like that, you really don't know any other opportunities.

Deep down, I want to tell my parents all about this, and I have tried, but they reject what I've been saying. Because they say there is really nothing I can do about it now.
The best thing you can do is finish your course if you ask me, especially the placement. You might find that the job is very much different to the study. I studied Civil Engineering, and work for the worlds 4th largest privately owned water company. My job has absolutely no bearing on the study I did.

It isn't like I have a choice at this point. I may as well.
It's as important to find out what's not right for you, as it is to find out what is right for you if you ask me.

I appreciate the sentiment, but knowing what you don't know what to do isn't very encouraging when you have no idea what you do want to do.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#9
if you finish your degree you can get a job doing pretty much anything, i have friends who did degrees in media who now work in HR. just get that bit of paper cos that is all employers want all a degree proves is that you can learn quickly what people need you to learn.
frankly i know BAs/BScs who are thicker than pigshit but still rank better jobs than me
Last edited by vocoderboy at Apr 13, 2014,
#10
Quote by Godsmack_IV
Maybe in terms of whatever 'product design' is. But in terms of design in general, you're designing something to be used by people. If you're interested in psychology, check out Donald Norman's book The Design of Everyday Things, formerly The Psychology of Everyday Things.

edit

Looking through Product Design BSc programs from different schools, about half of them incorporate psychology and the other half fall more in line with engineering rather than design.

They say this sort of thing all the time. They say that the psychology of people is a key area of study. When in reality they talk about psychology for 1 lecture and then quickly fill you up the rest of your time with lectures on mathematics, materials, financing, using CAD programs and learning how factories use injection moulding machines for the remaining 3 years.

In other words, they lie.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Apr 13, 2014,
#11
My school has two courses dedicated to Computer Game Design and then another for User Interface Design (maybe more, this is only from my department). Design, not implementation. These are courses that focus on the users/players. There's enough material within these two small subsets of design to fill out three courses. My impression is that if your school is only giving you a lecture's worth of user-centered design principles then the program probably isn't all that great.
#12
I'm in a similar situation, and you probably shouldn't listen to my advice, but I'll say it anyway because such is the way of the internets.

I failed my engineering degree. I don't know if I want a career in that field, but I can't think of any better alternatives. I don't even know if I could get an engineering job if I wanted to. My plan for now is to get whatever work I can to support myself. If I can save up some money, I'll be able to study something else in the future, provided I find something worth studying.

Have you considered studying in Europe? A lot of universities offer courses in English, and their tuition fees are significantly lower than in the UK. Research it, find out what your options are.

If you know that psychology is what you want to do, talk to your parents about it. Show them that you've been seriously considering it and considered all your options. It's not a bad career.

I'm slowly coming to terms with the fact that dreaming about something is more interesting than actually doing it, and jobs in most fields tend not to be very fulfilling. Work is just a means to an end while you wait to die.
Last edited by sashki at Apr 13, 2014,
#13
I have talked to my parents about wanting a career as a therapist, but they just say that doing my product design course when I want to be a therapist is a terrible waste of time in regards to spending all that time studying.

They never actually said anything helpful. They believe that ambitions and jobs should be kept separate or else I'll just let myself down.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Apr 13, 2014,
#14
You're too young to be stuck doing something you hate doing.

Be selfish. Do what makes you happy.

Your parents might not like it at first but your life is yours not theirs. They will come around when they see you are happy.
#15
Sorry about your situation. But it's good that you know your dislikes before hitting the workforce.

Just focus on finishing your degree (seriously, engineering grads get mad respect). Once that's done, start somewhere. You'll generate personal income--which, I hear, is empowering.


Are you sure you like psychology and therapy? If so, help yourself to some classes here: https://www.coursera.org/courses?orderby=upcoming&search=psychology
(If you want more information about psychology as a career, let me know).


And don't worry. It's gonna be fine.
Last edited by captainsix at Apr 13, 2014,
#16
If I were in your situation, I'd say finish your degree. Doing something you hate for 50 years is the last thing I'd wish upon someone, but the quickest means to your end seem to be finishing your degree, generating some fat dollars, and start studying psychology. Obviously the down side to that is that it's tedious, it's not what you want to do, and it's basically a shitty waiting game. On the other hand, it validates your time and money spent there, and gives you an opportunity to earn it back. It also gives you the chance to see what the actual job is like, not just the training. As mentioned before, they can be very different things. You might not mind it. Finally, and most importantly, you can prove to your parents that you tried it, and gave it an honest shot, and it's just not for you. They can bitch and complain all they want, but at least you know for sure. Plus you can pursue what you want to do, and still have that to fall back on. They'd probably be jazzed about that. Family pressure sucks ass, no doubt, but ultimately, you have to live your life, not theirs. The whole point of growing up and moving out etc etc is to start living separately from them.

Good luck, my friend.

EDIT: dick joke to lighten the mood
Quote by soundgarden1986
Screw your bases. If she doesn't let me go elbow deep in her ass on the first date, it wasn't meant to be.


Quote by willT08
Every thread on here to do with audio quality is like walking into a paddock of shit slinging chimps
Last edited by BledGhostWhite at Apr 13, 2014,
#17
I'm in the same boat as you man.

I'm 2/3 of my way through a BFA. I've realized that I'd rather keep my creative life and my financial security separate, and I want total artistic control over my music .

I'm considering different options, but at the same time, what I'm studying (music, sound design, recording) is all I've been doing for the past 5 years. It seems like going back to school for something else is like pressing the restart button and all that time and effort into your current education is totally wasted.

But like Xiaoxi said it's not like you're "locked in" to whatever field you study. The paper is an attestation of critical thinking, organizational skills, and your ability to learn. All of which are incredibly valuable in any line of work.

Besides, I think you're close to my age (early 20s). People go back to school all the time. It's not like once you go through it once you can never go back.

You still have a while to figure you' shit out. Take advantage of it.
#18
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Only in the context of marketing does that apply.


doesn't hurt to be a jack-of-all-trades though. may help you communicate with people invovled in marketing, gear your designs to be more profitable, maybe help you freelance; do stuff on your own; etc.

i dunno. just talking out of my ass here.
#20
everyone who isn't a total moron has doubts about their career choices when they're about to enter them. if you've already put this much time and money into your education, see it through. even if you don't want it as a career, you'll always have it as a fallback, which is a great thing to have.
#21
You don't need a degree in psychology to be a therapist. My mom has a friend who's a therapist and she has a degree in English. She's pulling in like 130 grand a year as well.
#22
Quote by macashmack
You don't need a degree in psychology to be a therapist. My mom has a friend who's a therapist and she has a degree in English. She's pulling in like 130 grand a year as well.

With all respect where it's due, I don't know if I can take what you say very seriously given your reputation of being a troll.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#23
How much formal psychology have you had exposure to?
| (• ◡•)| (❍ᴥ❍ʋ
#24
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
With all respect where it's due, I don't know if I can take what you say very seriously given your reputation of being a troll.


it's BS. but you CAN become a lawyer without a degree.
#25
Quote by progdude93
it's BS. but you CAN become a lawyer without a degree.


goddamn it
#26
I'm a product designer, and I agree with that guy that says that it has a lot to do with psychology, and not only marketing. Psychology actually takes a huge part of what Ergonomics, which people often mistake for product sizes and anatomic fittings which is a subject of Anthropometry.

In any case, I'm actually pretty passionate about my degree and I'm still afraid of my future, lol. I suppose you should just do what you love, because it is pretty soul crushing to do something you hate for all your life.

You're still young, it's not like there isn't time for you to do something else. I think it is a pretty flawed system to choose what you want to do with your life at such a young age, but I suppose that's how it works for the system when they want you to be über-productive.
#27
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
I've been putting off this decision for a long time, because it's a very real fear of mine.

I've been following a BSC in Product Design for the last 2 years now, and I did an engineering foundation course prior to that. But the problem is that I just hate all of it. I just don't see myself having any level of passion for it. So if I'm going to do somebody else's bidding for at least the next 50 years of my life, obviously I want to do something I love.

As of this time, I've been finishing off my second year and I've been asked by my parents how I'm going to get a placement. To say that I'm really dreading it is an understatement. I'm terrified. I've probably never been so scared in my life. And it's all because I hate where my life is leading.

In about a month, I'm going to be visiting a very close friend for the first time in MA. In the past year, I've been desperate to find what I want to do with myself. Being a therapist is the closest thing I've got to something that I'd like to do for a living. So what my friend and his family have decided to do is to show me around some universities and colleges I could go to, for study.

But my course qualifications have nothing psychology-related in them whatsoever. Which means that I would have to start over with an entirely new career, at 22 years old, while still having to pay a student loan for the engineering studies that I hate.

So I feel completely suffocated and pessimistic about ever doing something I enjoy. I'd rather just kill myself, honestly, if I don't get an offer in anything, or if i cannot afford it. Because the amount of pain in knowing that I've let my family down, is nothing compared to the suffering of having to do somebody else's bidding for the rest of my life, and in a field that I hate.

So what am I supposed to do now? I feel I've completely ****ed myself over, and all I'm doing now is just trying to put off the inevitable.

Is there hope? Is there anything I can do?


I went to uni, did an Arts degree, double majored in history and politics. First thing I did after graduating? Enrol into a personal training qualification. I now have my own business as a personal trainer.

Life is weird brah
No man has the right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training. It is a shame for a man to grow old without seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable


@gossage91
@overtimefitnessau
#28
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
I've been putting off this decision for a long time, because it's a very real fear of mine.

I've been following a BSC in Product Design for the last 2 years now,


Well there's you're problem, what use do you expect a Bronze Swimming Certificate to be in the world of Product Design?

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE

So I feel completely suffocated and pessimistic about ever doing something I enjoy. I'd rather just kill myself, honestly, if I don't get an offer in anything, or if i cannot afford it. Because the amount of pain in knowing that I've let my family down, is nothing compared to the suffering of having to do somebody else's bidding for the rest of my life, and in a field that I hate.


No, that's not suffering.... 'suffering' is something that parent's go though when their kids have commited suicide because they think they've let their family down by having a life that doesn't always go according to plan, which infact is pretty normal.
#29
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Which means that I would have to start over with an entirely new career, at 22 years old, while still having to pay a student loan for the engineering studies that I hate.


Oh wow you must be the first person to ever be put in that situation
Quote by Night
wtf is a selfie? is that like, touching yourself or something?
#30
I'm in a similar pickle TS. I've got two months left to my degree then I graduate. I'm going to get a bachelor's in commerce with a marketing major and communications minor. It's like the general arts degree for business. You can't really do much with it, or so I've been told.

I don't know what I want to do with my life so I went on exchange. I'm on the other side of the planet just so I could delay graduating by a few months. Totally worth it. I plan on going home to get my degree, work for a bit, and travel somewhere else. Hopefully by the end of the year, I'll have a better idea of what I want to do. Overall, I've never been so terrified about the future.

Side note, you can start a new degree at 22. I have a friend right now doing her second degree and she's 24. She even wants to do a masters after and that could be another 2 years.
#31
Quote by Wiegenlied
Oh wow you must be the first person to ever be put in that situation

So just because a person's problem is relatively common means that it can't be a serious issue? You sound like a very compassionate person indeed.
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Well there's you're problem, what use do you expect a Bronze Swimming Certificate to be in the world of Product Design?

It's not that simple. There are other circumstances that come into play.

The reason why I kept doing this engineering-related course instead of doing something different is due to the significant rise in tuition fees that occurred during my foundation year. It has risen above what I'm financially able to afford.

However, because I was already in the engineering faculty when the change occurred, I got to keep my old contract provided I kept in the engineering faculty throughout my stay at uni.

So it's easy to say what was I expecting, but in reality I had very few options.
No, that's not suffering.... 'suffering' is something that parent's go though when their kids have commited suicide because they think they've let their family down by having a life that doesn't always go according to plan, which infact is pretty normal.

My parents tell me that if I ever committed suicide, they would have absolutely no shred of sympathy or respect for me or the way I felt. My dad believes that young people commit suicide solely as a means to rebel against their parents. With such a callous attitude, it's likely to become a self-fulfilling prophecy.

With the struggles and pains I go through, and needing so much for my parents to see my struggles with an open mind and heart, I just can't trust them with anything personal whatsoever. Goes without saying that the relationship between myself and my parents is very distant despite how often we see each other. Most of my effort with talking them goes to simply telling them what they ant to hear, so they won't punish me.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Apr 14, 2014,
#32
Firstly, finish your degree. You'll have something great on your CV and it's something for you and your folks to be proud of, win-win.

Think about what you would do with your time were you to have all the money you could ever need. That's a clue as to what you should be doing. Try meditation if you need more inspiration.

Even if you end up in a job you hate it's just a means to an end, e.g. to fund your real dream.
ZEN JUDDHISM
The new solo project, and spiritual philosophy... Album out now !
----------------------------------------------------------
hybrid 6.0
Debut album 'Silent Destruction' out now
Read the Two Guys Metal review here
#33
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
But my course qualifications have nothing psychology-related in them whatsoever. Which means that I would have to start over with an entirely new career, at 22 years old, while still having to pay a student loan for the engineering studies that I hate.

People start new careers at many many stages of life.

My step-mother just re-trained as a psychotherapist over the last few years and is in her 50s. My dad only decided to be a teacher in (I think) his early 30s (and does something quite different now anyway).

You're 22, what you do now is by no means what you have to do with the rest of your life. Of course if it's something that requires a professional qualification that is your dream career (like therapy) then yeah you'll have to retrain at some point, but that doesn't mean that your only other options are product design or killing yourself. A lot of people do jobs completely different to what they studied in their degree, and a lot of people change career paths many times in life. It's not a problem, bro.

My step-brother did a chemistry degree and is now working some bank-type job in the city. Maybe one day he'll stop that and try something else. Maybe he'll retrain, maybe he'll do a job that doesn't need a specific qualification. The point is he has lots of options, and so do you.

Don't worry.
#34
Your parents are either the biggest ***holes or grand trolls it seems. Do what YOU want to do because you are the only that will regret it otherwise.

But yeah like everyone else has said, there's no need to worry about it yet. Finish your degree, get a job to earn a bit of income then by that point you may have found what you would like to work towards as a career.

I will be 21 this year and I have worked in retail, insurance and in August I will be starting a job within the Military. From experience it is not too late to change a career and your qualifications stand for your commitment to learning
#35
Man I wish I could have a job i didn't want...
Quote by sickman411
S-Gsus wept
#36
Quote by S-Gsus
Man I wish I could have a job i didn't want...

Careful what you wish for ---> http://www.workrant.com
ZEN JUDDHISM
The new solo project, and spiritual philosophy... Album out now !
----------------------------------------------------------
hybrid 6.0
Debut album 'Silent Destruction' out now
Read the Two Guys Metal review here
#37
Quote by Xiaoxi
Chill broseph. College degree does not mean you have to do what you studied. That's a rookie mistake.



Awesome advice. My degree is in biology. I work as a purchasing consultant for a music company.


The whole paradigm of deciding what you want to do the rest of your life when you're in your late teens and early twenties is pretty flawed.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#38
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Quote by SlackerBabbath

Well there's you're problem, what use do you expect a Bronze Swimming Certificate to be in the world of Product Design?

It's not that simple. There are other circumstances that come into play.

Dude, that was a joke and you totaly missed it. BSC, Bronze Swimming Certificate? Geddit?
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE

The reason why I kept doing this engineering-related course instead of doing something different is due to the significant rise in tuition fees that occurred during my foundation year. It has risen above what I'm financially able to afford.

However, because I was already in the engineering faculty when the change occurred, I got to keep my old contract provided I kept in the engineering faculty throughout my stay at uni.

So it's easy to say what was I expecting, but in reality I had very few options.

Look, the thing to remember is not to worry about the future, anything could happen between now and any future point so there really is no point in worrying about it.
However, if you want a life that you enjoy, then it is important that you fill your time with things you enjoy doing. So what if you'll have to pay a student loan for the engineering studies that you hate. We all have to pay for stuff we hate, that's pretty much how taxes work. In the great scheme of things, paying back a student loan isn't really all that important.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE

My parents tell me that if I ever committed suicide, they would have absolutely no shred of sympathy or respect for me or the way I felt. My dad believes that young people commit suicide solely as a means to rebel against their parents. With such a callous attitude, it's likely to become a self-fulfilling prophecy.

With the struggles and pains I go through, and needing so much for my parents to see my struggles with an open mind and heart, I just can't trust them with anything personal whatsoever. Goes without saying that the relationship between myself and my parents is very distant despite how often we see each other. Most of my effort with talking them goes to simply telling them what they ant to hear, so they won't punish me.


This is actualy much more common than you think, there are many young adults out there who have a completely different point of view than their parents. It's perfectly natural and the way that most people deal with it is just to get on with life, and if they ever need parental advice on something that they just know they aren't going to get from their parents, then they just go and ask someone who's better qualified than their parents.
Doesn't mean you shouldn't love your parents though, just accept the fact that they have different views to yourself and agree to disagree with them

Do you want to go with your friend and his family to look around some universities and colleges that you could go to for studying psychology? If the answer is yes, then I would advise you to do it. Who cares what your parents think, it's your life, not theirs.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Apr 15, 2014,
#39
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
So just because a person's problem is relatively common means that it can't be a serious issue? You sound like a very compassionate person indeed.

Its not that I dont have any compassion for you, I do and I wish you the best of luck.. its just that your post made it seem like changing a career path at 22 is the end of the world. I think a majority of people go threw something like this, a quarter-life crisis if you may. Your personality changes the most between your late teen years and your early adult years, and it just so happens that thats when your start making important decisions. You're going to be working the rest of your life until your retire, maybe 50 years, so what difference does under 5 mean to change the impact of those 50. A better job will potentially mean you retire earlier, so you might even get those years back!

Student loans are a bitch to pay back and for awhile you'll probably spite yourself for taking the course and putting yourself in that situation. Eventually though, you just accept that thats in the past and theres nothing you can do about it, and how the experience you had led you to the path your on now. The loans just end up in a pile of bills that need to be paid or your balls get busted so it becomes and habit and you don't think twice. ****, most of my bills are paid automatically. If you end up getting your degree and a good job, you can take the year after, stay at home and save up. Start your new career and moving out and taking care of your own place can be a really difficult adjustment. If you stay with the parents for a bit, you can potentially pay back almost all your loans within a year.
Quote by Night
wtf is a selfie? is that like, touching yourself or something?
#40
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Dude, that was a joke and you totaly missed it. BSC, Bronze Swimming Certificate? Geddit?

Bad Slacker Clowning.
Look, the thing to remember is not to worry about the future, anything could happen between now and any future point so there really is no point in worrying about it.

However, if you want a life that you enjoy, then it is important that you fill your time with things you enjoy doing. So what if you'll have to pay a student loan for the engineering studies that you hate. We all have to pay for stuff we hate, that's pretty much how taxes work. In the great scheme of things, paying back a student loan isn't really all that important.

As good as your advice is, I don't feel very comforted by the notion that anything could happen. Too many bad things have happened for me to really have optimism for the future.
This is actualy much more common than you think, there are many young adults out there who have a completely different point of view than their parents. It's perfectly natural and the way that most people deal with it is just to get on with life, and if they ever need parental advice on something that they just know they aren't going to get from their parents, then they just go and ask someone who's better qualified than their parents.
Doesn't mean you shouldn't love your parents though, just accept the fact that they have different views to yourself and agree to disagree with them

Agreeing to disagree is normal behaviour in a normal family, but I don't have a normal family.

My parents cannot deal with their differences without causing rifts by hurling insults at one another and starting insidious grudges. Sometimes it even resorts to violence and having things thrown at me by my dad. He is a cruel and sociopathic man. I've had advice from therapists telling me that I need to get out of this house as soon as I possibly can. I assumed you remembered me talking about this when I made another thread about a similar problem with my parents, so I didn't explicitly mention it at the risk of being a broken record.

My dad has always been a bit cold, but I've been able to bear it more than everyone else in the family just by having an open mind. But the stroke he's had has made him an outright sociopath, and it's tearing the family apart.
Do you want to go with your friend and his family to look around some universities and colleges that you could go to for studying psychology? If the answer is yes, then I would advise you to do it. Who cares what your parents think, it's your life, not theirs.

It really depends on whether or not I have afford my studies to get on the courses in the first place. I don't know the answer to that yet because I've been so busy with my current studies. And honestly, I'm scared of finding out. Because I want so much for this to be a reality, but I'm so afraid of being rejected on a financial basis.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Apr 15, 2014,
Page 1 of 2