#1
Hi,

I'm upgrading my strat with new pickups and new wiring. I have full humbucker, split humbucker and real single coil positions.
The pickups are Duncan SH-5 in bridge position, stock single coil in the middle, Duncan little '59 in the neck position.
Now I'm wondering if I should use a 500k or 250k tone pot. I searched the web but there is just a lot of arguing about that topic.
A lot of people say that 500k pots will make the sound too sharp in single coil mode.
I'm using a .22 capacitor which does not cut off too much treble..I don't want to produce jazz sounds with the tone knob, I just want to make slight treble ajustments.
I've also heard things like 500k pots will reduce the bass frequencies...Truth or myth?
Can't i just use a 500k pot, and if the sound is too sharp, roll back the tone a little bit to have a very similar result as when using a 250k? ...never found anyone suggesting that..?! Seems like a lot of guitar players forgot that a tone pot does not always have to be at 10.

One thing I want to add..I'm planning to use a fender S-1 switch potentiometer..they are quite expensive, that's why I don't want to buy a 500k AND 250k for testing...

I hope someone can give me some advice here!
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Last edited by offspring93 at Jul 16, 2014,
#2
Higher pot values load the signal less so more highs stay in the signal. The effect isn't that drastic but it is noticable. You'll probably want to use 500k because 250k makes the humbuckers sound quite muffled in my opinion. For some reason most cheaper guitars (especially strats) come with 500k pots and the sound isn't that harsh. If it is a problem for you in the single coil positions then you could roll down the tone knob a bit. That's what they're there for.

Do you mean you are using a .022 tone cap? .22 is a very large value for a tone cap. Both values, however, will cut out a lot of highs.
#3
Thanks for the quick response! So no such things as possible loss of bass with 500ks? Then I'll choose the 500k. Sorry that cap value was a typo, of course I mean a .022mF. Well it will not cut out as much highs as a .047mF which is common in fender guitars.
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Last edited by offspring93 at Jul 16, 2014,
#4
Pot value doesn't affect bass frequencies, so no. And. 022 is the fender value. .047 is the typical humbuckers value. I think it has to do with the inductance of the pickup but it really doesn't matter. If you don't want to cut a lot of highs I'd suggest .01 or even down to .0047 instead of .022.
#5
Thanks for your help Jim!
I guess you know a lot about guitar wiring. Can you take a look at the schematic I designed? I posted it in another thread. Link: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?p=32531068#post32531068
Look at the newest post here. I haven't got any feedback yet. It got a bit more complicated as I thought. In my view this should work but I am not very experienced. Can you tell me if this works or if there are mistakes? That would be great.
Right-wing morons, go suck my d#ck!

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Last edited by offspring93 at Jul 16, 2014,
#6
I used my stock pots on an American standard that I converted to H-S-H with good results. There was no treble loss while using the volume knob.
Hi, I'm Peter