#2
The same way everyone else does their audio recordings.
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#3
They don't record any differently. Maybe if the staccato effect isn't perfect you might get some cutting of silent sections.
#5
Speaking as someone who works in Metalcore a bit...

yeah. Very yeah.
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#6
No. The very sharp staccato effect isn't made by recording long notes and chopping it up, but after actually playing the riff yourself you can enhance the staccato effect by cutting out the rests (basically just like this, except you actually play it). It makes everything sharper because all of your instruments will cut off and attack at precisely the same moment. I just recorded an album about 50 to 60 minutes long with some slight djent influences, and I used this technique (the one I described, not the technique in the video) on maybe 2 or 3 riffs where it seemed to get the appropriate sound. This can also be achieved with the right gate/compression settings without cutting out the sound in your recording session. If I recall correctly, I saw Misha of Periphery explain it (the settings) in a gear video back when this sound was a new thing.
#7
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
No. The very sharp staccato effect isn't made by recording long notes and chopping it up, but after actually playing the riff yourself you can enhance the staccato effect by cutting out the rests (basically just like this, except you actually play it). It makes everything sharper because all of your instruments will cut off and attack at precisely the same moment. I just recorded an album about 50 to 60 minutes long with some slight djent influences, and I used this technique (the one I described, not the technique in the video) on maybe 2 or 3 riffs where it seemed to get the appropriate sound. This can also be achieved with the right gate/compression settings without cutting out the sound in your recording session. If I recall correctly, I saw Misha of Periphery explain it (the settings) in a gear video back when this sound was a new thing.

This all would actually be the case if all Djent guitar players were actually as good at playing as Misha Mansoor.

#8
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
This all would actually be the case if all Djent guitar players were actually as good at playing as Misha Mansoor.



..... Fair enough.
#9
AHhaha

Always felt like djent was much like modern dubstep.

With the nonsensical crazyness an all
#10
Quote by thenextkirk92
cutting "of" silent sections.

Lol you had already given me the answer but that little grammar mistake made me not notice it at first.
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#11
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
No. The very sharp staccato effect isn't made by recording long notes and chopping it up, but after actually playing the riff yourself you can enhance the staccato effect by cutting out the rests (basically just like this, except you actually play it). It makes everything sharper because all of your instruments will cut off and attack at precisely the same moment. I just recorded an album about 50 to 60 minutes long with some slight djent influences, and I used this technique (the one I described, not the technique in the video) on maybe 2 or 3 riffs where it seemed to get the appropriate sound. This can also be achieved with the right gate/compression settings without cutting out the sound in your recording session. If I recall correctly, I saw Misha of Periphery explain it (the settings) in a gear video back when this sound was a new thing.


Thanks that was mostly what i wanted to know. Well of to do my polyrhytmic ideas
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#13
I recorded some djent and I didn't cut shit, still obtaining the typical djent sound.

That video's making fun of guitarists who aren't good enough to play the thing in one take, and that may happen with every genre.
Name's Luca.

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#14
Quote by Spambot_2
I recorded some djent and I didn't cut shit, still obtaining the typical djent sound.

That video's making fun of guitarists who aren't good enough to play the thing in one take, and that may happen with every genre.


I can hear this cutting technique used on PTH's Volition. Something tells me they're not lacking in the skills to do much of anything. It's just an editing technique that creates a certain sound (sharp attacks with sharp gating). Recordings where it is used sound notably differently from recordings where it is not used. It's not a matter of cheating. It's just a matter of creating a certain sound that can't really be achieved another way. I realize you acknowledged that this is just making fun of certain people and it can happen in any genre, and for all I know there may be some bands that have done recordings in the ridiculous way that the OP video did it. I'm just clarifying that there are useful ways for skilled players to use this.
#16
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
I can hear this cutting technique used on PTH's Volition. Something tells me they're not lacking in the skills to do much of anything.
Bro do you even noise gate? (**** you linkerman

That isn't used to create any tight sound, that's used to record the same part in more than one take without making the thing too obvious.
The tightness is created by 3 things:
1. a noise gate with near-zero or zero attack and release
2. cutting bass in the guitar part
3. having other things play the same tight part, say a bass drum

And that's enough.

As Random3 wrote, the thing up there is cheating.
Well cheating may be a bit useless of a word in this case, though it's obvious that if you do that you're not good enough to play the thing decently in one take.

Oh wait I know what you're thinking about when writing about volition.
Like, the guitar part in clarity when the singer sings "the majority is almost never wrong"?
Yeah, that's no big editing deal.
No editing deal at all actually, it's a kill switch.
Name's Luca.

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#17
Quote by Spambot_2
Bro do you even noise gate? (**** you linkerman

That isn't used to create any tight sound, that's used to record the same part in more than one take without making the thing too obvious.
The tightness is created by 3 things:
1. a noise gate with near-zero or zero attack and release
2. cutting bass in the guitar part
3. having other things play the same tight part, say a bass drum

And that's enough.

As Random3 wrote, the thing up there is cheating.
Well cheating may be a bit useless of a word in this case, though it's obvious that if you do that you're not good enough to play the thing decently in one take.

Oh wait I know what you're thinking about when writing about volition.
Like, the guitar part in clarity when the singer sings "the majority is almost never wrong"?
Yeah, that's no big editing deal.
No editing deal at all actually, it's a kill switch.


I'm not describing cuts between riffs or parts of a riff. I admittedly have to do cuts in the middle of some riffs myself (I take pride in my composing, but I'm a admittedly a crap player), and that's not one I'm talking about. I'm talking about recording a chuggy riff that has rests in it, and then cutting out the excess sound produced during those rests. It creates a distinctive sound and really isn't an effective way to cheat because you can hear it happening. The idea proposed in the OP video for instance would be blatantly obvious to many people with a little bit of recording experience. He wouldn't get away with that cheating without us knowing it was happening.

That's actually not what the part I was referring to at all, and there's no kill switch. He's simply playing it just the way it sounds. Honestly I'd have to listen to the album again to remember some of the places I've noticed it. I don't really notice it on Volition until I have headphones in which isn't how I usually listen to it.

EDIT: One example is in the riff right before that. Under "the loudest voices scream uninspired..." The rests in this riff are cut out in the way I've described. It think the intro of Drumhead Trial might do it to, but it's not so obvious when it's not a chuggy riff.
Last edited by Macabre_Turtle at Apr 18, 2014,
#19
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
That's actually not what the part I was referring to at all, and there's no kill switch. He's simply playing it just the way it sounds. Honestly I'd have to listen to the album again to remember some of the places I've noticed it. I don't really notice it on Volition until I have headphones in which isn't how I usually listen to it.

EDIT: One example is in the riff right before that. Under "the loudest voices scream uninspired..." The rests in this riff are cut out in the way I've described. It think the intro of Drumhead Trial might do it to, but it's not so obvious when it's not a chuggy riff.


I do understand what you mean, and I am almost certain they cleaned up the audio using cuts and fades. It's fairly common, regardless of how tight you can play. I would be amazed if even bands like Periphery never did that.

To be clear, I am only talking about editing using cuts and fades to remove unwanted hum or scratches on the strings in between chugs or whatever. I am not talking about using these cuts to move the audio to the correct place in order to cover up out of time playing.
#20
Quote by Random3
I do understand what you mean, and I am almost certain they cleaned up the audio using cuts and fades. It's fairly common, regardless of how tight you can play. I would be amazed if even bands like Periphery never did that.

To be clear, I am only talking about editing using cuts and fades to remove unwanted hum or scratches on the strings in between chugs or whatever. I am not talking about using these cuts to move the audio to the correct place in order to cover up out of time playing.


Precisely.