#1
I've seen tutorial videos on making open chords sound less plain and I would like to know more. I saw a video on playing a G major style progression and playing the notes of the related pentatoninc scale, right near the chords at the second and third frets. Any one know of a minor style progression where I can use the same concept? Or any other ideas of making the open chords sound a little more interesting.
#2
Pick a few of the chords strings individually on the back side of the beat? Stuff like that. If im understanding you right.
#3
You can definitely add some interest by decorating the chords with some nearby notes like you say. But to me, the biggest area for being creative with open chords is in how you strum. There is so much you can do, from different strumming patterns, to arpeggiating, to mixing arpeggiation and strumming, left and right hand muting, all the different types of attack you can use to how you strum. The possibilities are endless!
#4
Quote by se012101
You can definitely add some interest by decorating the chords with some nearby notes like you say. But to me, the biggest area for being creative with open chords is in how you strum. There is so much you can do, from different strumming patterns, to arpeggiating, to mixing arpeggiation and strumming, left and right hand muting, all the different types of attack you can use to how you strum. The possibilities are endless!


Yeah i second that. Get outside your box with these techniques. Finger or hybrid picking harmonizing even.
#5
Good call! Thanks for the ideas. Do you maybe have a video I should see to get a better idea of how I can make those chords sound better?
#6
Learn how chords are constructed from and learn how to harmonise the major scale to derive the chords of a given key - that will teach you everythign you need to know.
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#7
Another thing you can use is chord substitution. This is something I really enjoy doing, as it can really change a song and make it yours. I realize that it's not exactly making open chords sound less plain, but it still adds interest. Another thing you can do is to learn different fingerings for chords. Instead of playing the ordinary G chord with the open B string, try adding in the D at the third fret of the second string - stuff like that can give you some much needed change.

As Steven Seagull mentioned, learning your chord theory can also help a lot.
#8
Interesting ideas. But excuse my lack of knowledge about chord theory, but why add in that D note?
#9
Nothing is more valuable than learning your music theory when it comes to playing chords. Sure some people may say "just play with your ear maaaan", but music knowledge is a particularly invaluable skill to have in your situation.