#1
Their were non metal bands before them who made heavier, faster, and harsher music. I don't see why these bands are labeled as being mind blowing my extreme. Is it because thrash was an extreme genre that was somewhat accessible?
#4
Non metal bands that were heavier? Do explain.
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#5
Being 43 and growing up in Indiana, I can tell you there wasn't much exposure to heavy music here. It was basically word of mouth, or maybe you were lucky enough to live somewhere near an independent record store that sold more than top 40 albums.

The east and west coast got the newest, cutting edge stuff. Then through magazines and independent record stores you learned about non-top 40 bands eventually. I was lucky enough there was a high school station in Indianapolis that would play metal every Wednesday night (WBDG Metalworks)for 2 hours. I always had 2 hours worth of cassettes ready to record. Ha
As far as heavier non-metal bands, I assume you might be taking about some of the early punk bands.

The bottom line is this: For 99% of people, the 1st time they heard Metallica or Slayer, it was probably the heaviest thing they'd ever heard up to that point.
#6
You also have to understand popular music at the time. Everything coming out of LA was Glam metal. Motley Crue, Poison etc. Metallica and Slayer were something that had an intensity not seen on the radio. It was louder, faster and more aggressive than anything MTV was willing to play.
There was no internet or satellite radio then.
They (Metallica especially) were riding the New Wave of British Heavy Metal (bands like Budgie, Diamondhead, Blitzkreig, and of course, Motorhead) and unless you were tape trading in the late 70s and early 80s, you would never have heard this stuff.
Punk also featured heavily in their influences. They were basically melding hardcore punk, NWOBHM and classic Heavy Metal music (Sabbath, Scorpions, UFO, Blue Oyster Cult) and making something new. It was a breath of fresh air at the time and the power and speed was grabbing legions of fans.
You should look up Sam Dunn's "Metal Evolution" documentary series. It covers everything from classic, thrash, to hardcore, and Nu and everything in between.
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#7
Quote by BathorySwans
Is it because thrash was an extreme genre that was somewhat accessible?

Yes. Moving on.
#8
they might have not been the fastest/heaviest/most extreme bands of their generation...
but the genius marketing and image development departments of the labels that picked em up definitely sold em to people as such.... and well.. marketing is quite damn effective, especially when done right.

if you listen to some king crimson tracks... theyre far more "brutal" and "extreme" than any metal band till today ... and this is coming from metalhead who's only heard a couple of king crimson tracks once or twice
Last edited by The SoundGuy at Apr 22, 2014,
#10
Quote by ryanbwags
You also have to understand popular music at the time. Everything coming out of LA was Glam metal. Motley Crue, Poison etc. Metallica and Slayer were something that had an intensity not seen on the radio. It was louder, faster and more aggressive than anything MTV was willing to play.
There was no internet or satellite radio then.
They (Metallica especially) were riding the New Wave of British Heavy Metal (bands like Budgie, Diamondhead, Blitzkreig, and of course, Motorhead) and unless you were tape trading in the late 70s and early 80s, you would never have heard this stuff.
Punk also featured heavily in their influences. They were basically melding hardcore punk, NWOBHM and classic Heavy Metal music (Sabbath, Scorpions, UFO, Blue Oyster Cult) and making something new. It was a breath of fresh air at the time and the power and speed was grabbing legions of fans.
You should look up Sam Dunn's "Metal Evolution" documentary series. It covers everything from classic, thrash, to hardcore, and Nu and everything in between.


I've seen Samm Dunn's documentary (The movie and the series) and while it wasn't bad there were several facepalm moments I recall though its been a while since I've seen either.
#12
Quote by lodgi
Jesus. No one actually listens/listened to that ramleh type of thing for pleasure do they?


Hell yeah I do! I love how the harsh noises and morbid vocals create such a beautifully bleak atmosphere! Even though its extremely noisy the textures of the music I find to be very relaxing and helps keep me calm and at rest. Personally I think its far more effective than crap like Sunn O))).

Maybe you'd prefer something a bit more subtle like this?

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=XWaZ9xx2JMo