#1
Hi all,

I picked up a friend's guitar a few days ago and he said I could keep it to practice till I get my own. I have never held a guitar before.

The guitar is an Alvarez RD8. From what I have read, it's a good guitar for ≤$500. I also have some videos and books and an analog tuner; a Wittner GT2.

So, I read and watched and read some more about tuning. I decided to do a standard EADGBe tune. I flip the switch to e and pluck\tune till the needle is centered. That was easy.

Then I flip to B and tune the 2nd string. As a confirmation, I flip back to e and hold the 5th fret. With e and B tuned, the 5th fret of B is maybe 20hz low?

I went through every string and tuned according to the tuner's directions. And every 5th fret ( 4th fret on G) comes up low.


I have used GuitarTuna (android app) and also a tone generator to see what's going on. I can't seem to get the 5th fret of B to sound a clear e.


BTW, I used an online tone generator and an android app called FG to generate a pure 82.41hz tone to calibrate my tuners. Of course, who knows what the frequency response of my PC\smartphone speaker\mic is.


Anyway, my Wittner GT2, GuitarTuna, and several web-based tuners all say e and B are tuned. Still, no luck in getting 82.41hz on the 5th fret of B.

Any ideas?


BTW, as for introductions, I recently retired (early) and grabbed a guitar to keep from going insane. I mostly like country music but my intent is to learn to read music and understand music theory. I'm using L&M Guitar videos and an old Mel Bay book for practice.
#2
Sorry. 329.62hz. It's early and I was reading upside down...

After some googling, I think the "intonation" is wrong. The neck is straight. So other than moving the bridge, I don't know if it can be fixed.

So, assuming it can't be fixed, should I tune the strings to the tuner, or tune the 1st e and then tune up from there?
Last edited by xptical at Apr 24, 2014,
#4
You move the saddles on the bridge forward or backward to shorten or lengthen the string.

Have the open string match the twelfth - exactly on the 12th, not behind or in front.

Also, if you can borrow a better tuner, it'll make your life that much easier.
A strobe style, like turbo or petersen.
#5
Quote by xptical
Sorry. 329.62hz. It's early and I was reading upside down...


Yeah you definitely want 440hz for standard tuning. Otherwise, it's the intonation on the guitar itself.