#1
I've decided that waiting on other musicians is not the way to go so I'm going to start my own solo metal project and I'm trying to make a list of things I am going to need to perform all the necessary tracks. So far I've got

a laptop
pod x3 live (for guitar, bass and vocals)
pod farm 2.5 platinum
reaper
A Guitar
A bass
A shure sm57
Addictive drums
Audio Technica ATH M40x for tracking

I eventually want to move to a real drum kit but finances will not allow it at the moment.
Any advice on what else I will need to have a successful experience would be appreciated. Should I get a condenser mic?
Last edited by BL1NDSIDE-J at Apr 24, 2014,
#2
IMO

Ditch the pod and any hardware in terms of amp modeling, etc. Software alternatives will prove far more useful imo (to include the free ones especially). Put that money towards a good interface. Otherwise you're looking at hefty sums for hardware workhorses with modeling/profiling.

Reaper & a one package suite for eq/compressors/limiters/saturation (demo to find whatever workflow/UI that turns you on). Or stick with its stock processing.

Don't skimp on the bass guitar.

Point of the sm57? I'm guessing for vox, personally don't care for its sound though. I'd still get it, in the case you get an amp later. Love my SM7b on vocals so consider it as a future upgrade

Can't speak much on Addictive Drums. I'm a Toontrack fan myself.

ATH-m50s have quite the utility for both referencing & tracking in my case.
Pairs nicely with my focusrite pro 24 with its VRM feature.

Condenser I'd say, if you're planning to mic an acoustic in addition to fry vox/typical singing, if you have a good room.
Last edited by Night at Apr 24, 2014,
#3
Yea I was thinking about the sm57 incase I ever get a good tube amp to mic up, What interface has decent mic pres? I've seen the focusrite scarlet 2i4 mentioned quite a bit on the net. Also I forgot to mention the pod x3 I've had for a few years but have never recorded with it does it suck as an interface?
Last edited by BL1NDSIDE-J at Apr 24, 2014,
#4
Have you mix experience? I'm suspecting no? I'd be more inclined to suggest you simply go for an interface, cans, reaper, nab the bass/guitar/virtual drum, and stop it from there.

You'll be spending more time learning how to bus and route audio, understanding basic mix concepts, learning to edit, pouring over your manual, basically getting your feet wet.

Nvm I guess the real question should be are you just looking to write music, or get into recording and mixing everything as well ontop of writing >_< Because the latter is what I'd suggest if one were already seriously into the hobby and have exhausted every shitty alternative there is to recording their music.

I'm worried I'm giving you shitty advice basically stating "buy all this shit" without really knowing what it is you're trying to accomplish. Being a one-man-band is striking me as vague atm for some reason

Check my sig for youtube/soundcloud. I'm basically doing all the performances on guitar/bass/vox and programming drums/samplers. But tbh it's mostly the mixing that becomes the most time consuming task, and I'm not sure if this is what you had in mind as far as one of your goals.

EDIT: concerning the pod, sry I thought you were considering its purchase (water under the bridge in that case, since you already own it). I can't comment on its quality. Their interfaces however have performed poorly as far as the input options go - by my experience.
Last edited by Night at Apr 24, 2014,
#5
Yea maybe I should simplify it and sell the pod to get a better interface. What I am trying to achieve is basically write and perform my own songs and produce my own albums. Along the same lines as what Darkthrone and other DIY bands do all the time.
#6
I'm not super worried about gear quality though, because I would actually like some grit in the production. I even considered doing it on 4 track cassette but was advised todo it digitally and just use plugins for a more gritty analog sound.
Last edited by BL1NDSIDE-J at Apr 24, 2014,
#7
Is there an audience for a one man metal band? Could you actually get paid gigs? I suppose it's possible but I've never seen it.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#8
Quote by Cajundaddy
Is there an audience for a one man metal band? Could you actually get paid gigs? I suppose it's possible but I've never seen it.


No I never intend to play live gigs I just want to make good music. Ruins Of Beverast come to mind though he eventually hired session people to play live. Making music for money is in my estimation the wrong reason to be doing it.
#9
Night I listened to a few of your recordings and they sound good, though I would prefer a different drum sound. I need to learn more about drum programs I guess.
#10
If you're not doing vocals and you already have the POD it will suffice as an interface, just use a totally clean patch (no effects, amps, eq, etc.). If you want vocals you'll need a proper interface. If you don't mind spending a little the Focusrite Scarlett 2i4 is a great starting point (I own one and love it), if you're doing this on the super-cheap then stick with the POD for guitar/bass and pick up a Blue Icicle as a mic interface.

Don't bother with Pod Farm unless you already own it, the free amp sims from LePou, Nick Crow, TSE, etc. can keep up or even sound better than it so it's a waste of money unless you already know it has the exact sound your after in it.

REAPER's a good starting point with a DAW, nothing else to say here really.

I'm gonna assume you don't need instrument recommendations for guitar/bass.

What are you planning on using the 57 for? it's a fine guitar amp mic and a decent snare mic if you were micing drums, but it's not too flash for recording anything else. If you're after a vocal mic then look at a Large Diaphragm Condenser of some description. I have a Behringer B2 Pro that I'm quite fond of, the AKG Perception 220 isn't half bad either. Around here the AT2020 is also a popular recommendation.

Not a fan of addictive drums personally, but then again I haven't used it much. If you're willing to spend a bit of time learning you can get a good metal sound out of Sennheiser DrumMic'A which is free, otherwise I like Steven Slate as far as paid stuff goes.

Don't know much about the M40x's but considering they're the newer ones I'd probably recommend you either get the M50x's or the slightly older M50's. The ATH-M50's are headphone's you'll probably never need to replace, by the time you're getting noticeably better headphones you'll be approaching a price range where a set of monitors is a better investment.
#11
I am going to use addictive just because a friend of mine gave it to me, I dunno if that alone is an indicator to stay away from it, but I know I want an organic drum sound and not the typical clicky shit you hear in modern metal a lot.
#12
If you want organic sounding you'll want something with decent samples first... really SD2 is the most organic sounding option available.

As I always say when people want to work with the Necro sound is that it's not as simple as doing a really shit job and not knowing what you're doing. It's about doing a good at the sound you intend to make.

It's surprisingly hard to make that kind of sound actually listenable.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#13
I know people have said it a few times, but I really would sell the pod and get a better interface. I also use the Focusrite 2i4. (It's arguably the best quality interface in that price range.)

You may want to look at downloading a few free amp/cab sims from this sticky. I really like LePou's stuff, which you'll see in there, because it's easy to work with and can be very professional-sounding.


Also, I would recommend building your laptop. (I went with a desktop, but same concept.) You will need one that is more powerful than the shitty laptops you get at Walmart (or whatever your area-equivalent store is) for $500, and you will save several hundred dollars if you build one yourself. You'll need a good processor, 8GB+ RAM, and whatever else you want. (Don't worry about an external soundcard; that's what your recording interface is for.)
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Apr 25, 2014,
#14
Hmm I wonder what GC would give me for trade in on the X3 Live oh and my laptop should be okay for the scope of this project it currently has 8 gigs of ram and a 2 ghz processor.
#16
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Also, I would recommend building your laptop. (I went with a desktop, but same concept.) You will need one that is more powerful than the shitty laptops you get at Walmart (or whatever your area-equivalent store is) for $500, and you will save several hundred dollars if you build one yourself. You'll need a good processor, 8GB+ RAM, and whatever else you want. (Don't worry about an external soundcard; that's what your recording interface is for.)

Last I checked laptop parts weren't interchangeable enough for building them yourself. The motherboards are made specifically to fit in a casing, as are the display boards and coolers. CPUs are sometimes even soldered into the board. Pretty much only things you can DIY are RAM and Hard drive upgrades.
#17
I guess you can get a "barebone laptop" where all there is to it is the mobo, processor and enclosure, you then add ram, OS and HD. I think he means "spec", as to you go to Apple.com and "custom build" your laptop where they gouge your brains out, especially on the memo upgrades. There are some specialist PC builders for music, from what I've seen they seem to be more popular in England than anywhere else.
#18
Quote by diabolical
I might suggest another route worth checking out:
used Boss Dr. Rhytm 880 which comes in with guitar/bass processor
Digital hardware multitracker like a Zoom R16 for example


Can you load your own drum samples? My line of thinking is that a Laptop and interface can do everything a sample/sequencer can do plus some, but I am unfamiliar with this piece of kit so I'll do some homework.
#19
No, you can't, but it does sound really good, check out some Youtube demos.
It is one of the out-of-the-box solutions though that sounds just as good as in the box.
I think Akai MPC is one of the few that can do that unless you get a keyboard/sampler that can load sounds, but if you go that route might as well use a computer at least for the rudimentary midi production, something like NI Battery will load sounds or the built in sample in Studio One, for example, or you can purchase a studio library like this:
http://www.houstonmusicreviews.com/GearReview/OceanWay_DL/OceanWay_DL_Edition.htm
#20
Quote by chatterbox272
Last I checked laptop parts weren't interchangeable enough for building them yourself. The motherboards are made specifically to fit in a casing, as are the display boards and coolers. CPUs are sometimes even soldered into the board. Pretty much only things you can DIY are RAM and Hard drive upgrades.

There are many online vendors that specifically allow you to specify what kind of specs you want. They then ship you a laptop that fits all your requirements, along with instructions on how to put everything together. So, no, they're not interchangeable. But you are technically "building it", in the sense that you both pick the specs and put the laptop together yourself. Of course, all the parts are designed to fit together (and aren't interchangeable with other similar parts).