#1
new to the forum, first and foremost "hi all"

i have recently started learning guitar, using a combination of guitar lessons, online tabs/ utube and rocksmith 2014. Have been using a left handed ibanez gio that i bought several years ago.

i was searching CL and found a very lightly used left handed Epiphone Les Paul sunburst for around $325 . im not that great, i can just play a few notes and stuff.

is it worth it for me to invest in a new used guitar (considering low price and condition) , or wait till i am able to play better.

please chime in..
Last edited by ron001 at Apr 25, 2014,
#2
First of all, welcome! (one of us... one of us....)

New guitars depend on a lot of things. What music do you play? What do you like/dislike in a guitar?

An Epiphone LP is going to feel a lot different than your Ibanez (it's going to be a lot heavier and the neck is thicker, mainly). If you have the chance to play it first to see if you like it, do so. You also need to consider that it may not be setup right (the strings may be too high off the frets, the neck may not be straight, ect.) and a good setup by a tech is like $75.

People here will tell you that a good guitar may make you want to play more, but I'm a supporter of the idea that you should play guitars at your playing level. I started on a crap guitar, then got new slightly better ones as I got better.

All in all, it's really up to you. Play it, see if you like it. I know it's not terribly spectacular advice, but it's all up to if you really want to spend that kind of money right this second and if you think it will be a good investment.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
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Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#3
Quote by TheStig1214
First of all, welcome! (one of us... one of us....)

New guitars depend on a lot of things. What music do you play? What do you like/dislike in a guitar?

An Epiphone LP is going to feel a lot different than your Ibanez (it's going to be a lot heavier and the neck is thicker, mainly). If you have the chance to play it first to see if you like it, do so. You also need to consider that it may not be setup right (the strings may be too high off the frets, the neck may not be straight, ect.) and a good setup by a tech is like $75.

People here will tell you that a good guitar may make you want to play more, but I'm a supporter of the idea that you should play guitars at your playing level. I started on a crap guitar, then got new slightly better ones as I got better.

All in all, it's really up to you. Play it, see if you like it. I know it's not terribly spectacular advice, but it's all up to if you really want to spend that kind of money right this second and if you think it will be a good investment.



Me too, good advice IMO.

A new guitar might make you want tot play more, but at a technical as opposed to psychological level the money would likely be better spent on a set up or amp upgrade. After all, the Ib is a decent guitar, on a par with the Epi.
#4
People here will tell you that a good guitar may make you want to play more, but I'm a supporter of the idea that you should play guitars at your playing level. I started on a crap guitar, then got new slightly better ones as I got better.


I have a pretty unique take on this, because when I decided to buy my first electric guitar (after years of playing acoustics) I bought two guitars- a Dean EVO Special Select, and a Dean Time Capsule Cadillac. Those two guitars differ in price by about $3000.

At first, I used them somewhat interchangeably. Over time, I gravitated more to the Cadillac (for a variety of reasons, one of which was that I had it in an alternative tuning which I prefer), and bought other guitars as well. But even though it is my least expensive electric, I still love, have and play that EVO. And I have it because it feels good in my hands and stays in tune extremely well. The only issue is its pickups, they're a bit muddy.

Based on my personal experience, I am solidly in the camp that prefers to buy guitars that feel comfortable (subjective standard), hold their tuning well (objective standard), and are relatively well made (objective standard) within your budget as opposed to considerations of nebulous "player skill level".

All that said, the Epi should be pretty decent in terms of quality...but only you will be able to determine whether you like the way it feels in your hands.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Apr 26, 2014,
#5
Quote by dannyalcatraz
I have a pretty unique take on this, because when I decided to buy my first electric guitar (after years of playing acoustics) I bought two guitars- a Dean EVO Special Select, and a Dean Time Capsule Cadillac. Those two guitars differ in price by about $3000.

At first, I used them somewhat interchangeably. Over time, I gravitated more to the Cadillac (for a variety of reasons, one of which was that I had it in an alternative tuning which I prefer), and bought other guitars as well. But even though it is my least expensive electric, I still love, have and play that EVO. And I have it because it feels good in my hands and stays in tune extremely well. The only issue is its pickups, they're a bit muddy.

Based on my personal experience, I am solidly in the camp that prefers to buy guitars that feel comfortable (subjective standard), hold their tuning well (objective standard), and are relatively well made (objective standard) within your budget as opposed to considerations of nebulous "player skill level".


Well not everyone has $3000 to blow, me included I'm old fashioned that way. I couldn't start on an expensive guitar. But I see it like the fact that they don't let student pilots fly the big jets. I for one started on this Yes, that is a plane with the number "666" on it. Yes, that alternator failed occasionally in flight. But the fact that it was a POS made it that much more of a learning experience. I feel the same about guitars, but I digress.

I guess, OP, if you like it and want it, get it.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#6
I realize that not everyone can drop $3k on an axe. Most of my electrics lie between $700-1300.

The point is, I see no real merit in buying uncomfortable and/or badly made guitars, regardless of budget or skill level. While a good guitar might not make me a better player, a bad one can definitely be a hinderance to learning and enjoyment.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Apr 26, 2014,
#7
Quote by dannyalcatraz
I realize that not everyone can drop $3k on an axe. Most of my electrics lie between $700-1300.

The point is, I see no real merit in buying uncomfortable and/or badly made guitars, regardless of budget or skill level. While a good guitar might not make me a better player, a bad one can definitely be a hinderance to learning and enjoyment.


Lol I suppose

Like I'm said, I'm old fashioned.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#8
Only if your Ibanez is giving you trouble that a new guitar would fix. For example, if that whammy bar makes staying in tune too difficult. Or if it is just absolutely uncomfortable, and you know that the Les Paul is better suited to your hands.

Otherwise, I'd just focus on practicing. That way, when you decide to look for a better guitar you'll be able to give it a real test run. As you develop as a player, you'll learn more and more about what suits your style.
Last edited by Ghostmaker at Apr 26, 2014,
#9
Look, I know its not what you asked at all, but if you're just learning, you should try playing right handed. It will be better in the long run for buying instruments, and it may be easier to learn what others are playing, whether while jamming, or with lessons.

Its absolutely a preference thing, but in my opinion, not having a singular handedness is good but also bad. And because you are just starting to learn, you can change your handedness if you want to. The notes stay the same but the physical aspects change drastically.


As for buying a better guitar, once you get past the beginner stage and know you're going to stick with playing guitar for a while, upgrade to a good mid-range guitar. Nothing horribly expensive, but I would look at guitars above $500 or more.
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

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#10
Quote by AWACS
Look, I know its not what you asked at all, but if you're just learning, you should try playing right handed. It will be better in the long run for buying instruments, and it may be easier to learn what others are playing, whether while jamming, or with lessons.

Its absolutely a preference thing, but in my opinion, not having a singular handedness is good but also bad. And because you are just starting to learn, you can change your handedness if you want to. The notes stay the same but the physical aspects change drastically.


As for buying a better guitar, once you get past the beginner stage and know you're going to stick with playing guitar for a while, upgrade to a good mid-range guitar. Nothing horribly expensive, but I would look at guitars above $500 or more.


One cannot simply change their handedness and become ambidextrous. It's not a preference, you are born left or right handed. If it's more comfortable playing left handed, play left handed. Sure it's harder finding lefties, but it's not like they don't exist. Switching to right handed undoes any progress made practicing and learning already, making you start back at square one.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#11
Quote by TheStig1214
One cannot simply change their handedness and become ambidextrous. It's not a preference, you are born left or right handed. If it's more comfortable playing left handed, play left handed. Sure it's harder finding lefties, but it's not like they don't exist. Switching to right handed undoes any progress made practicing and learning already, making you start back at square one.

That's why he recommended it now. TS hasn't been playing for a long time.

Guitar is one of the only instruments that have "left handed models". Look at violins, pianos, flutes, trumpets... There are no left handed models. On trumpet you press the valves with your right hand fingers. On French horn you press the valves with your left hand fingers. Violin is like guitar - it has the fretting hand and bow hand. But there are no left handed violins (or there may be but they are very rare and the vast majority of left handed violinists play standard violins). There are no left handed pianos. If you are right handed, you play bass notes on your weaker hand and if you are left handed, you play bass notes with your stronger hand. Handness doesn't matter on any other instrument (other than drums but they are easy to set up the way you like) so why would it matter on guitar? Yes, at first it may feel a bit uncomfortable, but really, it will feel uncomfortable any way. It's all about getting used to it. Playing the guitar requires two hands so I don't think it should matter if you are left or right handed. Also, there are lots of left handed guitarists who play right handed. Right handed guitars are easier to find and cheaper.

Playing left handed may feel a bit more comfortable at the beginning, but once you get better at playing it right handed, right handed playing will start feeling so much more comfortable.
Quote by AlanHB
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Apr 27, 2014,
#12
My take on handedness:

The early lefties didn't have much choice, and most learned playing a flipped righty axe. Today, there are many times more lefty guitars than ever before, but they're still outnumbered at least 100-1. However, those that are out there run the gamut from the typical (Strats, Teles. LPs, etc.) to the exotic...and at all quality levels, too. You just won't be able to find a lefty of each particular guitar.

So, while it is correct to say that if you're just starting, it will be easier for you as a lefty to learn to play right-handed, it isn't that big of a deal unless you foresee yourself buying lots of guitars in the future.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#13
thanks for all the input.

didnt want this to be a discussion about left handed or right handed playing style. i like /feel comfortable /natual with left handed guitar , so no way ill be changing that.

anyhow i bought the guitar, seening the condition and specking out similar left guitars on the internet, i found it to be very good deal. i will be keeping both guitars.. one in my living room /other in my bedroom. saves me the trouble of takeing the guitar up and down.
went down to guitar store, they printed out recipt. original price 500+.

also i picked up a acoustic guitar, some baisc books/ rocksmith (original) with usb chord, etc for $50. quite a good deal for 375$.


Last edited by ron001 at Apr 27, 2014,
#14
I come from things a little differently. Why are you learning lefty? I am a lefty but when I started out I learned righty because it makes it easier to watch videos and buy guitars. Now is the time to bite the bullet before you get to far along.
#15
Don't listen to the righties and even lefties telling you to switch. We are all wired slightly differently. I'm a lefty that has to do everything lefty, including guitar. When I messed around with right handed guitars it never felt natural to hold the neck let alone fret with it compared to the left handed models when I was just starting.

Finding guitars is harder, and a little pricier, but it fights off GAS and makes you really cherish the guitars you do own, especially if its exactly the specs and model you wanted.
#16
I am a natural lefty. I was in the military and originally learned to fire a weapon lefty, but the ejection port on a M16 is on the right. Got burned by flying brass and switched to firing right hand. In the end do what is comfortable to you but now is the time to change if you were going to do it.

Sorry we hijacked the debate and made it a lefty righty debate, but people on these boards tend to be cost conscious and it is definitely cheaper to buy righty guitars and easier to sale and trade them
#17
Quote by gsplsngr
I am a natural lefty. I was in the military and originally learned to fire a weapon lefty, but the ejection port on a M16 is on the right. Got burned by flying brass and switched to firing right hand. In the end do what is comfortable to you but now is the time to change if you were going to do it.

Sorry we hijacked the debate and made it a lefty righty debate, but people on these boards tend to be cost conscious and it is definitely cheaper to buy righty guitars and easier to sale and trade them


I understand your troubles. I'm right handed and left eye dominant. I had to buy a lefty bow starting out with archery and conditioned myself to shoot lefty. But I feel like guitar is totally different because you're doing dexterously complex things with your fingers. Not just pulling a trigger or a bowstring. It's all about comfort in the end.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#18
i believe the gear you use depends on how much you want to keep doing it.
basically if u know your going to do this in anyway shape or form atleast as a hobby
then yes a 300 to 400 dollar epi is worth it for any genre, and later if you feel it should go further
you can just drop some new pups in it and voila, stage ready(almost depending on your rig)
see what im getting at here? : )
i had the same dilemma years ago had a cheap ibanez wound up getn a mexi strat few years later dropped some lace sensors in it got a better amp etc hit the studio/stage
and kept growing, i hope this helps, and im sure plenty of people have already said the same thing more or less : )