#1
I want to know what the differences are between guitar and bass rail pickup. does anyone know what they are?
#2
Well the one goes into a bass and the other into a guitar, obviously.

The bass one is probably designed for really low ranges and not too good at the upper register ( as with many bass pickups, at least from my experience ) while the guitar one has more mid and treble of course.

What exactly do you want to know?
#3
Quote by kyuseok
I want to know what the differences are between guitar and bass rail pickup. does anyone know what they are?

Generally it's just shape, if you're thinking of putting a guitar pickup into a bass then go ahead, it'll work. I think guitar pickups might have more windings (in general) to give higher output for overdrive whereas bass pickups need to preserve the high end. (More winds means higher output but less highs, hence active pickups.)

If you're thinking of putting rails into a Squier Bronco (the usual source of these questions) then go ahead, it is recommended.
#4
Quote by Spaz91
Generally it's just shape, if you're thinking of putting a guitar pickup into a bass then go ahead, it'll work. I think guitar pickups might have more windings (in general) to give higher output for overdrive whereas bass pickups need to preserve the high end. (More winds means higher output but less highs, hence active pickups.)

Guitar pickups generally have less winds on the coil than bass pickups.

For example Fender's Custom Shop 60's Split coil P pup has around 9.5k winds while their Custom Shop Fat 50 strat pups have only 4.5k winds.

Anyways you can use guitar pickups on bass but it'll sound like nails in a can.
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#6
Quote by Spaz91
Well TIL.

Damn it! Disable can't use disable to disable Disable's disable because disable's disable has already been disabled by Disable's disable!
#7
Quote by realsmoky
Well the one goes into a bass and the other into a guitar, obviously.

The bass one is probably designed for really low ranges and not too good at the upper register ( as with many bass pickups, at least from my experience ) while the guitar one has more mid and treble of course.

What exactly do you want to know?


IME bass pickups have a more extended top-end than guitar pick-ups, generally speaking.
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#8
Quote by kyuseok
I want to know what the differences are between guitar and bass rail pickup. does anyone know what they are?


If you are speaking about pickups that employ a single or double metal rail rather than individual polepieces, then there is no difference. They both accomplish the same thing in the same way. The continuous metal rail is supposed to eliminate the slight loss of signal that can and does occur with traditional polepiece-equipped pickups when you bend strings. Once you bend them past the polepiece (but not far enough to position the string over the next polepiece), you get a slight loss of signal as the magnetic strength is no longer as strong as it should be. Since there are no spaces along the metal rail, this is not a problem.

Some pickup designers have claimed that with a metal rail rather than polepieces, string pull becomes a factor in getting a proper tone. I doubt that this is true, as most of the manufacturers who made that claim now offer a number of their pickups with metal rails.
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