#1
Ok so i was practising the solo section of Pour some Sugar On Me via Rocksmith and after trying the get the game to recognise my bend my string I THINK unwinded itself, now i try to but the string back on and tune it back up, but that didn't work, so i changed the string and it tuned up no problem (i always get nervous when tuning cos i think i'm gonna break the new string while tuning)

My question is should i change all of the strings, i don't play my guitar too often i changed them about a month and a half ago (however for approx. 3 weeks it's been sitting around in it's carry case as i was home for the holidays)
#2
You can keep strings for as long as they keep their tone and don't start wearing out. Personally I change strings about once a month because I play for a while everyday and often beat the shit out of my strings!

As for the answer to your question, you don't have to change them all if you just replace one, however replacing them all at once means you can have a good clean of your guitar, get the fretboard nice and clean!
#3
it's not necessary, but it's always nice hearing a pair of fresh strings. Only advice I can give is if inexperience is stopping you from changing them then do it 'cause the experience can never hurt. And don't worry about the string popping, as long as the slack is there it won't pop.
#4
A guitar tech put it this way to me: "If one goes, another one isn't far behind."

You might as well replace them all, it's going to sound better and strings come in packs anyway. And buying singles is such a waste of money.
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#5
I don't like changing just one because then one string sounds fresh and the others sound dead. I usually change strings before any problems (like not staying in tune or breaking) occur. When they start sounding dead/not feeling good, I change them.
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#6
Quote by blackleo89
it's not necessary, but it's always nice hearing a pair of fresh strings. Only advice I can give is if inexperience is stopping you from changing them then do it 'cause the experience can never hurt. And don't worry about the string popping, as long as the slack is there it won't pop.

I can change string, i've done it about 4 times now (a complete set) i have an anxiety problem, meaning i worry about every little thing at times
#7
It's good to change them all and give your guitar a good clean up,Get rid of all that dust between your pickups and clean that fretboard.But yeah you can change a string if you want,It will sound brighter than the old ones but,It's your guitar,Do it however you want.
#8
Putting on new strings gets a littler easier each time. You become more familiar with the process and you pick up little tricks to make it less of a pain in the ass.

You always want to change all the strings when one breaks. New strings are incredibly bright and have a bit of a metallic twang to them while old strings lose the brightness and sound... well... Dead. Playing a riff on the new string and then playing it on an older string will easily make it sound like it came from a completely different and inferior instrument. So change all of them.

You can always invest in locking tuners. They take out most of the sucky parts of string changing. You pull the entire string through the tuner, no slack. Then you lock it and tune up. No windings around the tuning post will be necessary with them.
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#9
1.) There are places to buy strings online that sell in bulk. The cheapest way is to buy bunches of individual strings (you can actually pay less because you avoid the fancy external packaging).

2.) Don't panic about changing strings; the more you do it, the easier it becomes.

3.) Three ways to preserve your strings: wipe them down after use (wipe the UNDERside of the strings as well as the tops), keep your guitar in the case (reduced exposure to air will reduce corrosion), put a VCI (vapor corrosion inhibitor) in the case with the guitar (check theruststore.com) and keep the case closed. Oh -- four. Put a long piece of plastic between the frets and the strings. ESP guitars often ship with them. It does two things -- it helps prevent your strings from wearing on the frets (ever see a guitar with dents in the frets that match the wound strings?) and it prevents *electrical* contact between the strings, bridge, frets. All corrosion involves an exchange of electrons. Prevent that exchange and your frets are less likely to get scratchy and green.

The VCI is particularly helpful if you have a guitar with a nitrocelluose lacquer finish, pearloid inlays, a faux tortoise-shell pickguard or vintage tulip plastic tuners. ALL of those are made of nitrocellulose, and as this stuff ages it outgasses nitric and sulfuric acids, which attack metal parts including pickup coil wire and strings. The VCI helps prevent those acids from contacting the metal.