#1
Hi guys, so I really like Alex Skolnick's style of playing both solo and rhythm-wise and I want to be able to write more like his solos and lead fills. I have learned some of his solos but still can't figure out his trademark technique and overall sound. Any suggestions on what scales, techniques or licks he often uses to bring that specific soul to his solos?
#2
Everything he does is jazz influenced. I'd suggest you pick up a jazz book and learn some stuff. and yeah, learn some of his solos. Particularly learn his phrasing because that 85% of it. Oh and get some .12's.
Gear:
1987 Charvel Model II
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1990 Charvette 100
1991 Ibanez RG560M
2006 Fender Mexi Strat
Jackson/Charvel Star W/ Custom Graphics.
Ovation CP 247 Acoustic
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Tutorial: Studio Quality Programmed Drum Sounds
#3
Yeah I know about his jazz influence but I have no idea where to start from. I don't have the time to get into jazz guitar theory at this time and without it, I'm not aware how to incorporate jazz into metal soloing. :/ He uses a lot of pinch harmonics and tends to rely on lick repeating with slight variations but aside from that I've not noticed anything else that could be considered his trademark.
#4
You're gonna have to make time brutha, I know he made an instructional video for that Rock House company a few years back. I'd look into it.
Gear:
1987 Charvel Model II
2010 Carvin ST300C
1990 Charvette 100
1991 Ibanez RG560M
2006 Fender Mexi Strat
Jackson/Charvel Star W/ Custom Graphics.
Ovation CP 247 Acoustic
Line 6 POD HD Pro X
Pro Tools 9

Tutorial: Studio Quality Programmed Drum Sounds
#5
Quote by worcease
Hi guys, so I really like Alex Skolnick's style of playing both solo and rhythm-wise and I want to be able to write more like his solos and lead fills. I have learned some of his solos but still can't figure out his trademark technique and overall sound. Any suggestions on what scales, techniques or licks he often uses to bring that specific soul to his solos?


Are you referring to his work with Testament? If so, it's neoclassical - not jazz. Scales are Minor, Harmonic minor, Dorian, Phrygian, Diminished, Chromatic etc.

His later solo work is jazz , but the early stuff with Testament has no jazz foundation at all.

He's one of the best metal soloists in history, so you'll need to practice a lot. I would suggest checking out John Petrucci's video Rock Discipline - that will cover most of the ground from a technique standpoint.
#6
Skolnick is a big Michael Schenker fan, so you could benefit from checking out the early UFO and first three MSG albums. Schenker mainly uses natural minor and minor pentatonic scales and you can hear a lot of his style in Alex' early work with Testament.
I'd like to help, but not as much as I'd like not to.


"To be successful, you need to be a good musician. To be popular, you just need to be fashionable" - Ritchie Blackmore
#7
Quote by reverb66
Are you referring to his work with Testament? If so, it's neoclassical - not jazz. Scales are Minor, Harmonic minor, Dorian, Phrygian, Diminished, Chromatic etc.

His later solo work is jazz , but the early stuff with Testament has no jazz foundation at all.

He's one of the best metal soloists in history, so you'll need to practice a lot. I would suggest checking out John Petrucci's video Rock Discipline - that will cover most of the ground from a technique standpoint.


I'm referring to his work with Testament (most notably 'Dark Roots of Earth') and yea, I know it's neoclassical but I have noticed that in the last album he uses some jazz influenced patterns in his licks (and overall sound) here and there.