#1
Has anyone got a good scheduals that they use. Eg 1hour playing songs then 30 mins scales etc through the week ?

i think this is my downfall as i just do random crap, any advice would be appreciated, thanks.
#2
I think it really depends on what kind of music you play :-/

For something like metal, especially more technical stuff, scale exercises and stuff probably help out more.

I'm a blues/blues rock/psychedelic rock player. For me, I spend between 1-3 hours a day just experimenting and improvising or learning something new in or around my 'genre tree' (every genre that loosely relates to what I play).

I hardly ever practice scales. For me, getting comfortable with the CAGED system and remembering how licks/patterns 'sound' is enough for me. I occasionally learn new scales and stuff but only if I come across something cool that I don't know how to reproduce. Then again, improvising is pretty much practicing scales but in a more 'applied' setting.

I think the most important thing is to put together something you're comfortable with and to always be open to exploring new things.

People like to shove exercises down new/intermediate player's throats (ESPECIALLY new scales), but as long as you have a good ear and have amassed enough knowledge to understand how music works (be it through learning 100s of songs or sitting down with a few theory books), and more importantly, how the music you like works, you'll be fine. The comfort and ease comes on the instrument through jamming and feeling the music and through playing for a long time. It's all muscle memory.

If you think a regimented schedule will put you on the right path to where you want to be, then go for it. If I were you I would break down some things that you want to improve on, find some exercises, or better yet, songs that have these elements in them, and practice them every day until you have it perfect. You'll know, too, because it'll roll right off your fingers

And don't be afraid to change up your schedule. In fact, you should probably change it up so different days you're doing different things. You'll be less bored.

Good luck, and have fun!
#3
Nope, never had one either; unless you're planning on going pro then I honestly don't think it's worth the kind of mental strain and fatigue it can cause if you're not in to it some day.
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#4
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Nope, never had one either; unless you're planning on going pro then I honestly don't think it's worth the kind of mental strain and fatigue it can cause if you're not in to it some day.


Honestly, even if you are thinking about going professionally it might not be for you. The kind of study we do for electric guitar nowadays have not been around for long. There wasn´t any institutions that taught "this is how you are going to practice electric guitar" until it became popular, which was with groups like The Beatles and Jimi Hendrix.

There are many players that became professionals and innovators that didn´t have a schedule to their practicing. If we look at someone modern like Guthrie Govan he has said himself that he learned by learning songs by ear, not doing exercises.

My personal "schedule" consists of learning tunes, aswell as improvising. You can learn a lot from actual tunes, you can learn scales, chords, progressions, modulations etc. And the best thing is that you learn them in context so you know how to use them.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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#5
i agree with everyone else, you don't need a real schedule, you just need to avoid being lazy and be just a little bit more scholarly with your approach to music in general
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#7
Monday : Scales and Modes practice - Modes
Tuesday : Improvisation and Backing Track practice
Wednesday : Listening and Song - Bassline
Thursday : Listening and Song - Guitarline
Friday : Tapping, Shredding, Speed and Strength building
Saturday : Re - Learning songs that I know
Sunday : Random

Each day repeat what you did the previous day for 5 minutes
Each day start doing what you're doing the next day for 5 minutes

Total daily practice time - 45 - 60 minutes or more.

This fitted my needs. Not sure if you'll like it though.

This is a scheduled for my bass guitar and lead bass skill development.
Last edited by realsmoky at Apr 28, 2014,
#8
Quote by Sickz
Honestly, even if you are thinking about going professionally it might not be for you. The kind of study we do for electric guitar nowadays have not been around for long. There wasn´t any institutions that taught "this is how you are going to practice electric guitar" until it became popular, which was with groups like The Beatles and Jimi Hendrix.

There are many players that became professionals and innovators that didn´t have a schedule to their practicing. If we look at someone modern like Guthrie Govan he has said himself that he learned by learning songs by ear, not doing exercises.

My personal "schedule" consists of learning tunes, aswell as improvising. You can learn a lot from actual tunes, you can learn scales, chords, progressions, modulations etc. And the best thing is that you learn them in context so you know how to use them.


When you learn songs by ear do you write it down too? I'm learning by ear a lot now but while I can play it it doesn't seem to make sense to me.

Like what are they doing here, why does this do that and why are they soloing here type thing.
#9
Quote by LTaces
When you learn songs by ear do you write it down too? I'm learning by ear a lot now but while I can play it it doesn't seem to make sense to me.

Like what are they doing here, why does this do that and why are they soloing here type thing.


Personally i don´t write it down, mainly cause i want to ingrain it into my memory as best i can, and for me writing stuff down means i become lazy and only use my ears to learn the tune and then i end up reading it after that.

The method i use is a 4 step method, lets say we are learning a phrase from a solo then the method would look like this:

1) Learn it by ear, the practice playing it. (To get comfortable with it)
2) Play it and sing it at the same time. (You might have to slow down for this, but getting a connection between your ear and guitar is great)
3) "Ghost it" and sing it at the same time. This is an interesting step, cause you will sing the phrase just as before, but you will only put your fingers on the frets without playing it. This is to connect your ears to your guitar even further.
4) Just sing it. If you can sing a phrase correctly, then you know it. You should always strive for it feeling as natural as "Mary had a little lamb" or "Happy Birthday", songs that are always with us.

Regarding the theoretical side of thing, i cant help you as much. I studied much theory even before i started learning by ear, so i can 90% of the time see how it fits in theoretically. If you would provide an example i could help you, but just saying that you dont understand how "x" fits with "y" is abit vague since there are lots of theoretical concepts is music, if you wish to study them.

I do however believe a good ear is far more important than understanding the theoretical side of it, but the best is of course having good knowledge of both.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#10
Ah that's great, I really like the 4 steps and will give those a go.

In regards to theory I guess what I mean is i kind of know tye scale shapes, intervals, arpeggios and how chords are built to an extent but what I don't understand is how to use it all or how it all fits together.

At the moment though I'm mainly just focusing on learning.songs by ear and mastering them, but it would be good to see how it all comes together so I can use what I'm learning.
#11
Quote by Sickz
There are many players that became professionals and innovators that didn´t have a schedule to their practicing. If we look at someone modern like Guthrie Govan he has said himself that he learned by learning songs by ear, not doing exercises.


This exactly. Jason Becker said he never had a set routine and just practiced what he wanted (Granted you still have to be focused), and I haven't had a schedule since I heard that.
#12
Quote by LTaces
Ah that's great, I really like the 4 steps and will give those a go.

In regards to theory I guess what I mean is i kind of know tye scale shapes, intervals, arpeggios and how chords are built to an extent but what I don't understand is how to use it all or how it all fits together.

At the moment though I'm mainly just focusing on learning.songs by ear and mastering them, but it would be good to see how it all comes together so I can use what I'm learning.


Ah, right. I am sorry but that is a huge topic, and it would take me ages to write down everything that has to do with how it all fits together to one picture. But perhaps i can point you in the right direction.

There is a site called "MusicTheory.net", which is a place i recommend for anyone starting out learning music theory. They have lessons in steps so you can study the concepts one at a time, but they are based on that if you go to lesson number 5 you need to know 1 - 4 first. I am sorry that i cant help you much more on that topic, i am more of a "face to face" kind of person when it comes to teaching theory.

Quote by Hardlycore
This exactly. Jason Becker said he never had a set routine and just practiced what he wanted (Granted you still have to be focused), and I haven't had a schedule since I heard that.


Exactly. Not having a set routine =/= unfocused practice. You can still have a focused practice session, but you might want to put your focus on material rather than having a routine that is "scales, chords, transcription, sight reading" etc.

I guess technically you can say i have a practice routine, but my practice routine is just that, learning tunes. All the other aspects some people put into their practice routines are in learning tunes for me. Scales? Used in the songs. Chords? Used in the songs. Ear training? Learning songs by ear. Music Theory? Analyzing the song as i learn it. Technique? In the song. You see my point?

I prefer having the routine of working on tunes in different styles (Blues, country, jazz, fusion, funk, rock, metal, soul, disco, bluegrass, pop) since i get everything in context. It´s (once again) just like Guthrie has said, if you purchase a chord book and work your way through it, when you get to the altered chords like a A7b9, you might ask yourself "why am i learning this chord? It sounds terrible". But if you learn it from a tune by joe pass as chord going to a Dmaj7 then you know what it is for.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#13
Read on up on John Petrucci - he was incredibly organized in his practice routine, with a system of folders etc. His approach might suit you if you want something more structured.
#14
Quote by Sickz
I prefer having the routine of working on tunes in different styles (Blues, country, jazz, fusion, funk, rock, metal, soul, disco, bluegrass, pop) since i get everything in context. It´s (once again) just like Guthrie has said, if you purchase a chord book and work your way through it, when you get to the altered chords like a A7b9, you might ask yourself "why am i learning this chord? It sounds terrible". But if you learn it from a tune by joe pass as chord going to a Dmaj7 then you know what it is for.


That's an absolutely brilliant way of learning. 'Cause then you're learning in a real situation where everything you learn has an application.

Looks like I've got some songs to learn.
#15
I have always felt that you learn more by learning songs than anything. It's PRACTICAL and it's real. Doing 1-2-3-4 exercises with a metronome is fine for warm-up but learning a solo note for note will do heaps more for you in the long run than running up and down scales. Plus, your ear kind of gets naturally trained just by repetition. AND, it's way more fun than finger exercises.
#16
If you want a broad skill set you should have a routine. There are enough different styles and techniques out there that you won't absorb them all just by working a few things out here and there. Becoming proficient in one style can take years by itself, and getting good in more than one demands efficient use of your time.

If you have a particular style in mind you want to play, and don't want to play much else, then just dig in to your favorites and make sure to spend good time on it every day.

Either way, it's worthwhile to organize a bit and spend some time on skills separate from music. You'll want a solid technique base so you're not overwhelmed by the tunes you try to learn. And having good ears is a basic necessity for any musician.