#1
I saw these new 3D printed synthetic guitars they have now. They look kinda cool, even though I'm more a traditional aesthetic kinda dude. Fender is even prototyping with this technology. The coolest part is, is that they sound fantastic too. Who woulda guessed that, right? Despite the fact that they're all plasticky looking, they do have a wood core to hold the naughty bits, like the bridge and the neck and the pups. Also, the necks right now are traditional necks, I guess until they improve the process and the materials to get an entirely synthetic one. I would defnitely get one, like a hollow Strat, but they cost so much right now, like <$2000. Even if one wants to print their own, the machines are pretty pricy too, but then after tha initial investment you can print a whole bunch more!

I think that they are totally kick ass and sound just like we all expect a guitar to sound like, which is the most surprising part. So who here thinks that, once costs go down and we log the traditional woods to extinction, that 3D printed guitars will be the future of the industry?
I only feel like me when I'm behind my ax...
#2
Quote by slayer1979
I saw these new 3D printed synthetic guitars they have now. They look kinda cool, even though I'm more a traditional aesthetic kinda dude. Fender is even prototyping with this technology. The coolest part is, is that they sound fantastic too. Who woulda guessed that, right? Despite the fact that they're all plasticky looking, they do have a wood core to hold the naughty bits, like the bridge and the neck and the pups. Also, the necks right now are traditional necks, I guess until they improve the process and the materials to get an entirely synthetic one. I would defnitely get one, like a hollow Strat, but they cost so much right now, like <$2000. Even if one wants to print their own, the machines are pretty pricy too, but then after tha initial investment you can print a whole bunch more!

I think that they are totally kick ass and sound just like we all expect a guitar to sound like, which is the most surprising part. So who here thinks that, once costs go down and we log the traditional woods to extinction, that 3D printed guitars will be the future of the industry?



As a Engineering Design Drafter, I use 3D CAD everyday. I am excited by this.

Say you had access a 3D Printer, I could Model a Guitar to your design. Send you the CAD file and you could Print it out. How cool is that?


.
#3
Quote by wiggedy
As a Engineering Design Drafter, I use 3D CAD everyday. I am excited by this.

Say you had access a 3D Printer, I could Model a Guitar to your design. Send you the CAD file and you could Print it out. How cool is that?


.


Im an engineering designer too. This sounds amazing
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#5
Quote by Skullivan
Pretty sure he left, which sucks because the builds were pretty cool.


This guy reported him, what a suck!

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Cool, but this is pretty much advertisement. So reported.


Some people are real Bum Clencher's

Hey this is not me so this is not an ad is it.

http://www.odd.org.nz/videos.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWa8sEgpOrM#t=124
Last edited by wiggedy at Apr 28, 2014,
#6
I just really think that this is a breakthrough, and ab excellent opportunity to advance this archaic art ad industry. We're not still playing lutes (most of us), and look how far we've come from the lute and cittern. From the frying pan to the Esquire to the Tele to the Strat to the Les Paul etc... Now they have hemp guitars HEMP! Take a look at Mada Guitars. They sound every bit as good n crunhy as any Les Paul out there! Does anyone think wood will be phased out altogether?
I only feel like me when I'm behind my ax...
#7
I myself am studying as a product designer at BSC level.

Imo, as versatile as 3D printing is, using it to make a guitar is nothing more than a gimmick. I don't think wood will ever be phased out because musicians generally romanticise tradition. Guitars often hold sentimental value to people over the objective facts and figures. And in my opinion, it should stay that way. Musical instruments shouldn't just be seen as tools to play music on. For all the amazing things they do for people, they deserve to be romanticised.

I'm not saying that 3D printing guitars should be discouraged, I'd just never buy one.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Apr 29, 2014,
#8
As somone who does most of their design work for builds up front in 3D CAD I'd love to be able to just print one out. And obviously it opens up a whole new vista of artistic and technical opportunities.

I've loved the ODD guitars ever since I came across them a couple of years ago. Shame they're so pricey.

Interesting viewpoint from T00DEEPBLUE there. I agree that a musical instrument can be more than just a tool for a musician, and there is indeed a very emotional relationship that can be had with a guitar. But I don't see why that should be affected by the materials used in the construction.

There can be a lot of "voodoo" attributed to tone woods in electric guitars but the fact that the likes of the Steinberger composite guitars, the Switch Vibracell (plastic) and the acrylic Jems (and others) all exist and sound exactly like - wait for it - electric guitars (and I don't see why this is surprising at all) just goes to show how much flexibility in construction could be available.

The only thing that holds back advances in guitar construction technology are precisely these traditionalists that like to perpetuate the view that somehow vintage instruments, methods and materials are "better". I don't know why this is. While vintage cars or hifi equipment are fun to have around if they're in working condition, few people seem to claim that they are superior to their modern equivalents with quite the same fervour guitar enthusiasts do. I seem to have strayed from the topic but I'll just deflect the heat from the guitar shamen for a minute by citing this article about blind testing violins.

Each to their own. At the end of the day I don't begrudge anyone their opinion, so I say, leave the crappy, worn out, warped stuff to the old geezers with more money than sense and bring me my unique, plastic work of art. In 60 years time maybe my grandkids will be romanticising about the true beauty and "craftsmanship" of it compared to their modern, mass-produced recycled cardboard and epoxy monstrosities.
#9
Quote by von Layzonfon

Interesting viewpoint from T00DEEPBLUE there. I agree that a musical instrument can be more than just a tool for a musician, and there is indeed a very emotional relationship that can be had with a guitar. But I don't see why that should be affected by the materials used in the construction.

Because wood is a natural material. It's inconsistent therefore every guitar is a little bit different from one another. It's those quirks that gives every guitar a unique personality. With a 3D printed guitar, there is pretty much none of that.
There can be a lot of "voodoo" attributed to tone woods in electric guitars but the fact that the likes of the Steinberger composite guitars, the Switch Vibracell (plastic) and the acrylic Jems (and others) all exist and sound exactly like - wait for it - electric guitars (and I don't see why this is surprising at all) just goes to show how much flexibility in construction could be available.

They do sound like guitars. But they just sound like different guitars. I'm not saying that artificial materials are a bad thing or anything, I just want my guitar to have some individuality on a fundamental level.
The only thing that holds back advances in guitar construction technology are precisely these traditionalists that like to perpetuate the view that somehow vintage instruments, methods and materials are "better".

Well for some people, they really are.
I don't know why this is. While vintage cars or hifi equipment are fun to have around if they're in working condition, few people seem to claim that they are superior to their modern equivalents with quite the same fervour guitar enthusiasts do.

There are a multitude of reasons why that is. If you want to get from point A to point B at a low cost, then absolutely get a modern car if that is the only goal. But for some people, getting from A to B is dwarfed by the experience of owning and driving a 1970's Plymouth 'Cuda. Sure it'll run you to ground with debt just by fuelling it and it'll kill you in a car crash, but it's a vehicle that makes a hell of a noise and makes you look as cool as James Dean. In other words, it's about the journey rather than the destination. It just depends on what the goal you're trying to achieve is. And no doubt will you have to make sacrifices to get there.
I seem to have strayed from the topic but I'll just deflect the heat from the guitar shamen for a minute by citing this article about blind testing violins.

I've heard about this little test, and it's the same story here. Owning a musical instrument isn't just about making music. For a lot of people it's owning a piece of history, and that has a lot of emotional value which a modern guitar will likely never have.
Each to their own. At the end of the day I don't begrudge anyone their opinion, so I say, leave the crappy, worn out, warped stuff to the old geezers with more money than sense and bring me my unique, plastic work of art. In 60 years time maybe my grandkids will be romanticising about the true beauty and "craftsmanship" of it compared to their modern, mass-produced recycled cardboard and epoxy monstrosities.

I find it interesting how you claim to respect my opinion, yet you're peppering me ever so gently with passive aggression. Calm down.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Apr 29, 2014,
#10
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
I find it interesting how you claim to respect my opinion, yet you're peppering me ever so gently with passive aggression. Calm down.
Heh, I'm calm. And I didn't mean for you to take it personally.

Of course the pleasure is in the ownership of an artifact, over and above performance statistics, but I honestly don't see why I shouldn't be just as engaged with some laser sintered polymer as with a lump of dead tree. It may be identical to the next one off the line (although 3D printing actually has the potential to reduce the cost of one-off, unique products) but as soon as it's mine then it's mine and that makes it unique to me. Many of the guitars I own are mass-produced, but that doesn't stop me from being attached to them.

I don't pine for a '57 Les Paul (or whatever) but despite what I've written up there (which was a little tongue-in-cheek), I wouldn't actually try and persuade someone that they're "old tat", in the same way I think it's unfair of the vintage brigade to label anything innovative as "gimmicky and soulless".

Again, not digging at you. I suspect you're probably right and the 3D printing thing will be a passing fad. In a way that's a good thing though, as it adds a little rarity and history to what would otherwise be a common, albeit fancy, plastic guitar.
#11
Eh, 3D printing is incredibly cool, especially in the medical field, but I'll pass on the guitars.
I'll take a heavy-ass slab of wood over a piece of plastic any day of the week.
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#12
Quote by von Layzonfon

Of course the pleasure is in the ownership of an artifact, over and above performance statistics, but I honestly don't see why I shouldn't be just as engaged with some laser sintered polymer as with a lump of dead tree.

I'm not saying that you shouldn't be. I'm just saying that I wouldn't.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#13
I disagree with the whole romantisizing of the proverbial retro guitar. I love technology and i love guitar. And as much as I like the whole classic solidbody guitar build, id be happy to watch it be phased out for a new line of guitars that can achieve any tone with the twist of a knob, stay in tune indefinitely, and be aesthetically modern (or classic if you wish). All for an affordable price. I think we are heading in that direction. Theres a market for it. But there will always be those pesky clingers.
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#14
Quote by von Layzonfon


The only thing that holds back advances in guitar construction technology are precisely these traditionalists that like to perpetuate the view that somehow vintage instruments, methods and materials are "better".


It's very much what's stagnated the guitar industry, this slavish devotion to some notion of traditionalism. The mantra of "if it was good enough for __________, it's good enough for me" has locked us into specific sounds, into specific materials and into some very boring designs.

3D printing is making inroads everywhere. It's been around for years; George Lucas referred to them as his "3D fax." His designers would take 3D representations of his Star Wars characters and hardware and send the designs to Lucas, where they'd be printed by plastic deposition printers. It's how he approved (approves) everything from action figures to toys to detailed bits and set pieces for upcoming productions.

What's more important than the materials are the designs.
#15
I really feel that the materials originally chosen for the first commercialized and mass produced solid body electrics had more to do with materials availablity, cost effectiveness, look, weight, and ease of workability. How did Leo Fender know that alder or ash sounded better than poplar or basswood? How did the guys at Gibson deduce that mahogany sounded distinctly different from maple or rosewood? They probably only cared about the factors that were best for their business strategy, and not the best "tone" or whatever you supposedly get from variious wood types.
So, when you think about it, none of them probably knew or cared about the "tonal characteristics" of the species as opposed to which wood would make the most money.
I only feel like me when I'm behind my ax...
#16
A large portion of the guitar selling industry is fueled by nostalgia. The guys back in the day played axes made of these materials, so that's what they lust for in later years, and that's what is passed down and around to the youngins, and the companies realize this, so they feed off of this phenomenon we call nostalgia to make the most money.
The big brand names don't want to switch to making guitars out of foreign materials because it won't make as much money, dispite the fact newer and vastly superior options have come along. New things are usually very slow to catch on, and history proves that. So until companies can make the most bang for their buck with these newer materials, it's all archaic bullcrap.
I only feel like me when I'm behind my ax...
#17
Quote by slayer1979
The big brand names don't want to switch to making guitars out of foreign materials because it won't make as much money, dispite the fact newer and vastly superior options have come along. New things are usually very slow to catch on, and history proves that. So until companies can make the most bang for their buck with these newer materials, it's all archaic bullcrap.


I'm curious. At what point did this 3D printing machines plastic become a vastly superior material?

I'm jumping in late here, but to clear the air, I, as a supporter of the "archaic bullcrap" of wood-made guitars, love the idea of a guitar that is so easily made. As seen in that steampunk 3D printed guitar, there are millions of possibilities never before attainable, and I like progressive-ness.

Now then, while these guitars sound just as good as wood guitars, and being in support of mother Earth and all that jazz, I don't think wood-made instruments should be discredited. It is an artform that will be around as long as there is wood to make them with, and to assume that it will eventually stop because people wont want wood is a bit silly.

Would i own a printed guitar? Absolutely. Because I love gimmicks. And until this goes into a product line, I second the opinion that 3D printed guitars are just that. A gimmick.
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