#1
I always struggle writing lyrics I play bass and started playing guitar and want to get into acoustic stuff but I don't understand how you can just think of lyrics that sound good. Everytime I get inspiration my lyrics are cheesy and no good . Is there a key to lyrics or can you just write them or not.
#2
Quote by BassBen93
I always struggle writing lyrics I play bass and started playing guitar and want to get into acoustic stuff but I don't understand how you can just think of lyrics that sound good. Everytime I get inspiration my lyrics are cheesy and no good . Is there a key to lyrics or can you just write them or not.


Write down your thoughts and phrases. Make the lyrics one central tone. Then from there just enhance them to fit the song and the sounds.
#3
I think a if you're new to writing lyrics, you often sound cheesy. Really the key is revision. Look at what you're saying, and what you're playing; do you have a message of feeling you want to convey right there? and build around it. For me what helps a lot is if I imagine this character, with not a whole lot of detail, but enough for me to know what he/she is thinking, seeing, feeling, etc. And connect that as like metaphor to someplace I've been. Make it personal. Also, keep a notebook and scribble down nonsense. Out of 100 lines you're bound to get something at least remotely good
#4
Actually I struggle to complete lyrics.

I'll come up with a block of words (4 lines for example) and will really struggle to go from there
#5
When I write lyrics I usually do this:
1-Search for an inspiration first. A random event, a meaningless chore, the weather, you can use anything if you look at it deeply. Other artist songs and lyrics may also be a good inspiration, but you have to be careful to no make your lyrics seem alike the artist's.

2-Disconnect from the world while you're writing. You won't be able to write properly if you keep thinking about what you have to do the next day, or if you're constantly being interrupted.

3-Play the actor. Create a character with thoughts and feelings about something and be this character. Also, don't be afraid to put your own feelings and thoughts on this character, this what gives passion to your lyrics (if you want passion, if not just don't do it). Just remember: Your lyrics don't have to be in 1st person just because you created a character, you can make your character narrate something too (sounds awesome in matters which involve less passion).

4-Be actual. Don't write like your characters lives in 1940 during the World War II, it'll sound unsettling. You can of course still write about a war, check out next tip:

5-Use analogies, metaphors, irony, etc. It just sounds awesome when you say something without actually saying it. They also sometimes create a certain ambiguity and/or subjectivity that helps your lyrics get better connected with the person who's listening to it. Good examples:

"From green to red our days pass by" (Trigger by In Flames) = Green is usually a color which we use to express tranquility, safety and red is used to express something that's not right, unsafe. "Our days pass by", means that we're slowly getting closer to an end (probably death) "our days" is the time we have to do something, and "pass by" mean they just get lost. So, the phrase could be translated like: "From tranquility to struggle we live on".

"They say that love is forever
Your forever is all that I need" (If I'm James Dean, You're Audrey Hepburn by Sleeping With Sirens) = An easier one to understand, even though a lot of people don't get it. It's not written "They say that love LASTS forever" which would be the more obvious phrase, the word "is" creates a mutual relation of equality so love is forever as forever is love and then you can just replace the word "forever" in the second verse can be replaced by the word "love", so: "Your love is all that I need".

6-Use rhymes only when you feel necessary. Some people just keep rhyming all the time as some others just don't rhyme at all. In the first case the lyrics sound boring, and in the second one they sound like they're missing something or they end up being lost in the middle of the song because it can't artistically stand out, and you don't want this to happen. Use it moderately, a good way to do it is by using half-rhymes or by not rhyming a few verses in the strophe, breaking the repetition.

7-Review everything. Reviewing is the most important part in the whole process, it takes out all the weird stuff you put in your lyrics, and also helps you find better words for what you want to say. You can review your lyrics in any part of the process, be it in the middle of the creation or in the end.

8-Review everything again at a latter time. Something that may have sounded good while you were writing may not really sound good, but you're so involved with the lyrics or the character that you can't see it. I often find myself writing too emotional or too shallow phrases sometimes. This is also very important to get the cheesy stuff out of your lyrics. I usually do this after I had sometime back in the world, done the things I'm used to, get out with people, basically when I completely got everything music related out of my mind (that's me, you might want to do it differently).

Everything I wrote is how I do it. They're not rules, they're tips. You can choose what you're going to follow and what you want to ignore. Hope I helped.
#6
Quote by flaaash
Actually I struggle to complete lyrics.

I'll come up with a block of words (4 lines for example) and will really struggle to go from there


I think you may have a problem expressing or just organizing what you want to say. A redaction teacher I once had taught me to create topics related to the subject I was going to write about and then use it as a screenplay. I was not writing poetry back then, but it'll work beautifully in that case as well. So you basically do this:

Write the subject
1-Write one opinion/thought/feeling related to this subject
2-Write another opinion/thought/feeling related to this subject
3-Write another, and another, and another until you think you wrote enough.

Then you use it as a guide, say you're talking about violence:
Your screenplay would be:

Violence
1-It's ridiculous
2-It makes me mad
3-We should do something to stop it

You would probably want to write more for a full song, but this is just an example. Then you detail more each topic, you can do it in a strophe, in a verse, anyway you want:

Put the cop down, beat him up
Only because the government is wrong
Forget about his children and family
Is there any sense in it?
(1-It's ridiculous)

I can't stand to watch this (2-It makes me mad)
Watch we destroying each other (1-It's ridiculous)
Why can't we just bother
To fight our true enemy? (3-We should do something to stop it)

Doesn't sound so good, but I think you got the idea. If you didn't get the idea of the lyrics notice that I'm Brazilian.

If at one point you can't get more lines, go back to your screenplay and write more opinions/thoughts/feelings, and keep writing. If you keep doing this there'll be a time when the opinions/thoughts/feelings will start to come so clear that you won't need your screenplay anymore.