#1
Earlier in another thread, I was trying to make an unusual tonality through chord progressions and came up with something. It went B5, Caug5 (C, G# dyad), Am or A5, and E major. Now I made this chord progression from the B Javanese/Dorian b2 scale (it's a mode of melodic minor that goes B, C, D, E, F#, G#, A, B) and used only the notes of that scale. The problem is that earlier I was told this progression is in A minor but I can't wrap my head around that.

I mean A Minor is derived from C Major which has no flats or sharps yet there's two sharps (F# and G#) being used in different chords. Also wouldn't the root/chord being resolved be B5? I looked up Diatonic theory and that only made things worse (it says chord progressions are made from the scale). It just doesn't sound like A Minor either.
Basically I'm trying to either figure out how people got to this conclusion or how I can make a chord progression with a B Javanese/Dorian b2 feel.

Sorry for posting another topic but I thought this warranted one (it didn't fit with my mixed modes topic too well). I do know quite a bit of theory and could tell you the difference between D Major and D Minor if need be. However I can't apply it well to my guitar playing at all. Does anyone have tips.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#2
If you rearange those notes they make up the a melodic minor scale. The progressoin is most likely ii V i V looped. Bminor E+5 Aminor E.
Augmented fives on the dominant are very common in minor keys. C augmented is the same chord as E augmented (C, E, G# and E, G#, C) so you are playing the V in a minor.
#3
Now that Duaneclapdrix has explained the theory, I would ask you to use your ears. Play the progression through a few times. Then, stop first on B5. Does it feel "at rest"? No? Ok, now continue the progression all the way through again. Next time, stop on the 2nd chord (which is actually an Eaugmented). Does it feel "at rest"? Ok, keep doing this until you can hear which chord is "at rest".

To my ears, only the Aminor feels "at rest". That means Aminor is your tonic (your "i" chord). The progression resolves at Aminor, so the key of the progression IS Aminor.


Make sense?
#5
B Javanese is another name for Dorian b2, a mode of the Melodic Minor scale. Also I get it now but it seems like theory-wise C Major would be as good a choice as A Minor (after C is closer to B and A Minor is a mode of C Major). Guess it's back to the drawing board with my Modal mixture progression idea. Thanks but does anyone know how to apply theory to guitar?
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#6
It cant be in C major because it resolves to a minor. Just because C major and a minor have the same notes doesn't mean that they are the same. Chords progressions
function differently in both keys and they both resolve to completely different notes. A minor isn't a mode of C major because A aeolian is different from a minor. A minor is a key and a aeolian is a mode. I don't want to get into all of that business, but lets just say that a mode is a harmonic event and not a scale.

And about applying theory to guitar, theory is theory. It doesn't have anything to do with what instrument you play. I think it would be helpful to get a firm understanding of how keys work and forget about modes. They're not really useful for very much at all.
Keys, harmony, chords, motives, themes and form is where it's at.
Last edited by Duaneclapdrix at Apr 28, 2014,
#7
Most scales (or modes of them) are not meant to be a complete list of all the notes you find in a piece of music. Many of them really only come into play for specific chords, sometime borrowing notes from other keys.

For example, if you have a piece in plain old C major, but throw in an Ab-G7 change, you can use all kins of weird b2 and altered scales, but only on those two chords.

If you want to use those scales to make properly modal music, where the scale DOES define all the notes you'll use, then you need to trash the idea of a "progression". With modal music, the scale is the harmony and the chords are just rearrangements of the the harmony, not actual changes of harmony.
#8
Quote by cdgraves
Most scales (or modes of them) are not meant to be a complete list of all the notes you find in a piece of music. Many of them really only come into play for specific chords, sometime borrowing notes from other keys.

For example, if you have a piece in plain old C major, but throw in an Ab-G7 change, you can use all kins of weird b2 and altered scales, but only on those two chords.

If you want to use those scales to make properly modal music, where the scale DOES define all the notes you'll use, then you need to trash the idea of a "progression". With modal music, the scale is the harmony and the chords are just rearrangements of the the harmony, not actual changes of harmony.


This
Most of the time to get that "flavor" for the scale you do a vamp.

Example would be Bmin7/C aug/Bmin7 or
Bminb9/E maj/ Bminb9

Another example is have B play a pedal note in the bass. and play the chord from the scale over it.

Example

Bmin7 - Caug/B - Bmin7 - E/B - Bmin7



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#9
You already have a thread on this subject. Stick to it. Closed.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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